tbone909

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About tbone909

  • Rank
    Comets Star
  • Birthday 09/22/1966

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    New Westminster
  • Interests
    Music,movies,hockey,baseball,football (US football) ,World Cup Football,basketball and a lot of other things i won't go into.

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  1. I love the way he's shaking like a scared field mouse.
  2. 2018 FIFA World Cup

    France in the final.
  3. Not enough if you ask me.
  4. Skytrain Manners - What bugs You?

    Must be a full moon !
  5. 2018 FIFA World Cup

    I think Sweden would have to play with 9 men. Canada hasn't played in the World Cup since 1986.
  6. 2018 FIFA World Cup

    The announcers had England with the win with 66 minutes played after the second goal Pickford was by far the man of the match. Would have been 3-2 Sweden if he wasn't in there.
  7. 2018 FIFA World Cup

    Thank you Football gods
  8. https://www.yahoo.com/news/carolina-gov-mcmaster-trump-supporter-wins-gop-runoff-011854524--election.html?soc_trk=gcm&soc_src=dbb2094c-7d9a-37c0-96b9-7f844af62e78&.tsrc=notification-b S.Carolina Gov. McMaster, a Trump supporter, wins GOP runoff COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — One of President Donald Trump's earliest and most loyal supporters won a key runoff Tuesday, as South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster fended off a challenge from a self-made millionaire to secure the Republican gubernatorial nomination. The vote tested the heft of Trump's endorsement in South Carolina, where McMaster, 71, was elevated to the governorship he'd long sought early last year following the departure of Nikki Haley to serve as U.N. ambassador. As lieutenant governor, McMaster was the nation's first statewide elected official to back Trump, ahead of South Carolina's early presidential primary. McMaster — a former state attorney general and U.S. attorney who was elected lieutenant governor in 2014 — has had the last year and a half to develop the mantle of an incumbent. He's tallied up economic development announcements and championed issues aligned with the president's priorities, such as clamping down on sanctuary cities and restricting funding for groups affiliated with abortions. In November's general election, he'll seek a full term for the office that eluded him in 2010, when he lost a four-way primary to Haley in his first bid for governor. Tuesday's runoff threatened to embarrass the White House if the governor fell short to businessman and first-time candidate John Warren. Warren largely self-funded his effort and argued he was more similar to Trump than McMaster. Both Trump and Vice President Mike Pence have visited the state in recent days to campaign for McMaster. During a wide-ranging speech at a rally in West Columbia on Monday night, Trump implored Republicans to back McMaster. Trump pointed to his frequent nemesis, the news media, and warned that a loss for McMaster would be portrayed as a defeat for him. "So please, get your asses out tomorrow and vote," Trump said. He followed up the rally with a sunrise tweet telling voters McMaster "will never let you down." Trump has a mixed track record when going all-in for candidates. His preferred candidates have recently lost in Alabama and Pennsylvania. Two weeks ago, McMaster was the top individual vote-getter in the GOP gubernatorial primary but failed to get the majority needed to win it outright. In November, McMaster faces Democratic state Rep. James Smith, who won his primary outright. People will fall for anything.
  9. https://finance.yahoo.com/news/supreme-court-upholds-trump-travel-ban-142008850--politics.html?soc_trk=gcm&soc_src=5b2061e4-87d9-11e5-93d4-fa163e6f4a7e&.tsrc=notification-brknews Court upholds Trump travel ban, rejects discrimination claim WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries, rejecting a challenge that it discriminated against Muslims or exceeded his authority. The 5-4 decision Tuesday is the court's first substantive ruling on a Trump administration policy. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the majority opinion, joined by his four conservative colleagues. Roberts wrote that presidents have substantial power to regulate immigration. He also rejected the challengers' claim of anti-Muslim bias. But he was careful not to endorse either Trump's provocative statements about immigration in general and Muslims in particular. "We express no view on the soundness of the policy," Roberts wrote. The travel ban has been fully in place since the court declined to block it in December. The justices allowed the policy to take full effect even as the court fight continued and lower courts had ruled it out of bounds. Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote in a dissent that based on the evidence in the case "a reasonable observer would conclude that the Proclamation was motivated by anti-Muslim animus." She said her colleagues arrived at the opposite result by "ignoring the facts, misconstruing our legal precedent, and turning a blind eye to the pain and suffering the Proclamation inflicts upon countless families and individuals, many of whom are United States citizens." Justices Stephen Breyer, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan also dissented. The policy applies to travelers from five countries with overwhelmingly Muslim populations — Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen. It also affects two non-Muslim countries: blocking travelers from North Korea and some Venezuelan government officials and their families. A sixth majority Muslim country, Chad, was removed from the list in April after improving "its identity-management and information sharing practices," Trump said in a proclamation. The administration had pointed to the Chad decision to show that the restrictions are premised only on national security concerns. The challengers, though, argued that the court could just ignore all that has happened, beginning with Trump's campaign tweets to prevent the entry of Muslims into the United States. Just a week after he took office in January 2017, Trump announced his first travel ban aimed at seven countries. That triggered chaos and protests across the U.S. as travelers were stopped from boarding international flights and detained at airports for hours. Trump tweaked the order after the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco refused to reinstate the ban. The next version, unveiled in March 2017, dropped Iraq from the list of covered countries and made it clear the 90-day ban covering Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen didn't apply to those travelers who already had visas. It also eliminated language that would give priority to religious minorities. Critics said the changes didn't erase the ban's legal problems. The current version dates from September and it followed what the administration has called a thorough review by several federal agencies, although it has not shared the review with courts or the public. Federal trial judges in Hawaii and Maryland had blocked the travel ban from taking effect, finding that the new version looked too much like its predecessors. Those rulings that were largely upheld by federal appeals courts in Richmond, Virginia, and San Francisco. Roberts wrote that presidents have frequently used their power to talk to the nation "to espouse the principles of religious freedom and tolerance on which this Nation was founded." But he added that presidents and the country have not always lived up "to those inspiring words." The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries, rejecting a challenge that it discriminated against Muslims or exceeded his authority. The 5-4 decision is the court's first substantive ruling on a Trump administration policy. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the majority opinion, joined by his four conservative colleagues. Roberts wrote that presidents have substantial power to regulate immigration. He also rejected the challengers' claim of anti-Muslim bias. The court may have signaled its eventual approval in December, when the justices allowed the policy to take full effect even as the court fight continued and lower courts had ruled it out of bounds. Roberts was careful not to endorse either Trump's provocative statements about immigration in general and Muslims in particular. "We express no view on the soundness of the policy," Roberts wrote. Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote in a dissent that based on the evidence in the case "a reasonable observer would conclude that the Proclamation was motivated by anti-Muslim animus." She said her colleagues arrived at the opposite result by "ignoring the facts, misconstruing our legal precedent, and turning a blind eye to the pain and suffering the Proclamation inflicts upon countless families and individuals, many of whom are United States citizens." Justices Stephen Breyer, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan also dissented.
  10. 2018 FIFA World Cup

    Great game by Iran. They should be proud of the performance they put on tonight.
  11. Navarro had it wrong, i think the special place in hell will be for Trump and is lap dog Sessions.
  12. I think as long as it doesn't effect Donald's bottom line he could really care a less. IMO the longer this trade war on all fronts goes it will effect everyday Americans in the long run.
  13. Trump to slap 25% tariffs on up to $50 billion of Chinese goods; China says it will retaliate https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/trump-administration-slap-25-tariff-120500498.html The Trump administration will impose a 25 percent tariff on up to $50 billion in Chinese goods, a decision that brought swift condemnation from Beijing as trade conflicts between the world's two largest economies escalate. In a statement Friday, President Donald Trump said the measures will affect Chinese goods "that contain industrially significant technologies." The action comes "in light of China's theft of intellectual property and technology and its other unfair trade practices," he added. Trump noted that the White House could impose additional tariffs if China retaliates with duties of its own on American crops or other products. China's Commerce Ministry responded quickly to Trump's statement: "We will immediately introduce taxation measures of the same scale and the same strength. All the economic and trade achievements previously reached by the two parties will no longer be valid at the same time," Beijing said in a statement translated by CNBC. The United States Trade Representative said the U.S. will initially impose a set of tariffs on 818 items worth about $34 billion on July 6. Separate measures affecting 284 products worth about $16 billion could take effect following a review and public comment process. The action Friday marks Trump's latest move to crack down on what he deems as unfair trade practices by major trading partners. He is already embroiled in an escalating trade conflict with Canada, Mexico and the European Union. Those entities cried foul and retaliated when Trump imposed steel and aluminum tariffs on them. Taken together, the trade conflicts — and the threat of even more barriers — raise the specter of damage to a healthy American economy that the president frequently trumpets. Speaking to "Fox and Friends" on Friday morning, Trump downplayed concerns about a trade war with China. "The trade war was started many years ago by them and the United States lost," he said. China's discontent with the tariffs could also affect another key Trump effort: the push to get North Korea to abandon its nuclear and missile programs. Getting Pyongyang to agree to firm denuclearization will rely in large part on the application of international economic sanctions. China, North Korea's only major ally, is critical to the effort to keep economic pressure on North Korea. Following a summit between Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un this week that led to a loose commitment to denuclearization, China suggested it could relieve sanctions on Pyongyang . Trump's action drew support from one of the president's biggest critics, the Senate's top Democrat, Chuck Schumer, who said "Trump's actions are on the money. Twitter Ads information and privacy Some Republican lawmakers and pro-business groups criticized Trump's action. While Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, applauded Trump for taking on China, he said "tariffs will harm American and Chinese businesses and consumers, and will put economic growth in both countries at risk." "Ill-conceived trade actions that weaken the American economy, alienate allies, and invite retaliation against American businesses, farmers and ranchers, undermine our nation's ability to successfully confront China's unfair trade policies," the Senate Finance Committee chairman said. U.S. Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Thomas Donohue said tariffs are "not the right approach." "Imposing tariffs places the cost of China's unfair trade practices squarely on the shoulders of American consumers, manufacturers, farmers, and ranchers," he said in a statement. National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons pushed the administration to instead secure a bilateral trade agreement. He said that "rather than pursuing a piecemeal tariffs approach, now is the time to seize the opportunity before us and work toward a U.S.-China trade agreement that will benefit American workers for generations to come."
  14. Cross Canada Road Trip

    Prince Edward Island is really beautiful this time of year, i grew up on the Island and spent many wonderful summer's on the fantastic beaches on the north shore of the Island.
  15. What are you listening to?