SID.IS.SID.ME.IS.ME

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SID.IS.SID.ME.IS.ME last won the day on November 18 2018

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About SID.IS.SID.ME.IS.ME

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  1. I know this post is tongue in cheek, but you definitely have a case, as far as last year goes. Markstrom led the Canucks in GAR (28.8) and WAR (5.1). Next closest was Petey with 15.7 GAR and 2.8 WAR. No other Canucks above 10 GAR and 2 WAR. (GAR=goals above replacement; WAR=wins above replacement; stats per Evolving Hockey) This is a big reason why we have to hope Markstrom’s 2018-19 season wasn’t just a fluke and a one off. His WAR stats were actually the 8th best in the entire NHL, among goalies.
  2. Pettersson. Not just because he’s our best player and plays a prime position. But because of his influence on the others. All last season, we’d read about Canucks watching Elias and feeing inspired to become better versions of themselves. I mean, just read these words from Horvat: “For sure I was inspired by him. I can say it first hand. He inspires me to be a better 200-foot player. “And he’s only played five games,” said Horvat. He can’t help but laugh at how that sounds out loud. But he’s so on point here. “I noticed he was special in preseason,” he continued. “It was right away. You could see it. It’s why everyone in this room has so much respect for him. “Why I have so much respect for him is because he plays so hard away from the puck. “It’s insane. The skill, you see it. That’s sick. But for him to be so good defensively and positionally and for him to be so relentless on the puck, it’s unbelievable to watch. “As an older guy like me, who has been in the league for five years, I watch him and I want to be like him. I want to be like that. “He pushes me to be a better player. “It’s awesome to have someone on your team who pushes you.” That’s what makes Petey our most important player. He pushes even a heart and soul guy like Horvat, a guy with unquestionable work ethic, to elevate his game.
  3. Goofing around with FaceApp: I guess just Eriksson’s decline through his 30’s got me wondering what “old Loui” might look like.
  4. Unfortunately, the Canucks didn’t help much in preventing those assumptions: And there was similar messaging from the front office around additions like Eriksson and Gudbranson. It’s not as simple as the Canucks were desperately chasing the playoffs, and this drove their acquisitions through much of Benning’s tenure. But it’s also not as simple as Benning was working the same exact plan from day one, and we’re now reaping the inevitable rewards of his sound management practices since 2014. Vancouver spent considerable cap space and assets on players they believed would help them “win now” while providing stability and leadership to allow the kids to grow and develop. How successful this was is certainly up for debate. The Benning years saw us have the worst record of any team in the NHL over several seasons, so the “winning atmosphere” angle was largely a fail. And he made some acquisitions that either resulted in net asset loss, or tied up considerable cap space in players that likely will not help this team when it reaches a competitive window (some may even need to be moved out in cap dump trades with “sweeteners”). Not sure if those moves really helped us get any better, either then, now, or into the future. I’m really not interested in going negative on Benning. I’m far from a hater. But I’m equally disinterested in fluffing up his management record. There’ve been mistakes. The rebuild has been far from optimal. We’ve finally reached a place now where one can see the potential for things coming together for this team, but before we actually reach “contender” status, Benning (or his replacement) may very well need to spend nearly as much time and energy cleaning up after some of his own mistakes, as was devoted to cleaning up “the mess” from the team he inherited in 2014. Many here will disagree with my assessment, of course. CDC remains the land of “in JB we trust.” Personally, I’ve never “trusted” JB completely as the guy to get this team where it needs to be. That level of faith just isn’t in my nature. But I’ve always wished him well. I think he’s made some very good moves in the last few years. I think we’re headed in a good direction now. But I also think he’s stumbled at many stages along the way. Just my $0.02, and I don’t expect everyone to agree.
  5. Yup, Nylander ended up getting $41,774,194 of actual money, spread out over 6 years. He will not receive the full $45 million “total salary” you’ll see listed on the cap websites. His average salary (actual) received is $6,962,366, which is identical to his listed cap hit in years 2-6 of his contract. And also identical to his accumulated cap hit in the first year of his deal (the prorated amount actually charged against Toronto’s cap in 2018-19). Nylander’s contract breaks down like this: Cap hit, years 2-6: ($10M x 126/186 +$2M + 33M) / 6 years = $6,962,366 Cap hit, year 1: $6,962,366 x 186/126 = $10,277,778 Accumulated cap hit, year 1: $10,277,778 x 126/186 = $6,962,366 Projected cap hit, years 2-6: $6,962,366 Salary received, year 1: $10 million x 126/186 + $2 million (signing bonus) = $8,774,194 Salary remaining, years 2-6: $33 million Total salary (actual): $8,774,194 + $33 million = $41,774,194
  6. I don’t think Jake has found his best linemates yet (although they may already be on the team and just haven’t clicked yet), as far as chemistry and complimentary skillsets, but when he does, I think he could be a really valuable player. You look at his tracking data and there’s some pretty special stuff in there. His ability to create possession entries and shots is quite remarkable (90th and 98th percentile, respectively, in the NHL). He just needs to play with linemates (and in a defined role) that can make the most of these contributions. If that ever clicks for Jake, look out. And I’m actually still quite optimistic it will come together one day. Virtanen has the potential to be a highly valuable component of a very high end forward line. He just needs the right linemates around him, so he can truly play to his strengths (some of which are actually elite).
  7. Could also trade Sutter, Baertschi, and Schaller. If we weren’t at all fussy about the returns, I think we could move all of those contacts without too much grief. That would easily clear enough space to sign Boeser (and also Goldobin), add Gusev, and keep Gaudette up as well. We’d even have enough cap space to carry Eriksson this season, if necessary, until the right deal could be made (maybe at the TDL) to dump his cap as well.
  8. I guess Melania needs to go back to Slovenia, and stop telling the “greatest and most powerful nation on earth” how to “be best.” But Trump may be right in saying that the USA has, under his leadership, become a “complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world.” That’s what he meant, right? So, I guess, good on him for admitting he sucks. Not sure what the next step should be for Trump. Maybe deport Melania and resign from the Presidency?
  9. Probably already posted, but I don’t exactly read this thread religiously, so figured I’d share. https://dailyhive.com/vancouver/micheal-ferland-career-canucks-help-gino-odjick Gino Odjick helped him quit alcohol Vancouver Canucks / Twitter It wasn’t until the end of 2013, after a season-ending knee injury coupled with a drinking binge, that Ferland finally reached out to the Calgary Flames for help to curb his alcoholism. Then-Flames head coach Bob Hartley put Ferland in touch with a player he used to coach in junior (in 1987-88 with the CJHL’s Hawkesbury Hawks), Canucks legend Gino Odjick. Odjick, who grew up in an Algonquin reservation in Quebec, also battled addiction during his career.
  10. My thinking as well. From another article, the three kids were ages five, one and a half, and seven months. The mom left the car running and unlocked. EDIT: not that locked and turned off (and no a/c) would be better. Just don’t leave your damn kids alone in the car! EDIT2: still, probably better than this mom: https://www.fox29.com/news/police-mom-arrested-after-letting-children-ride-in-inflatable-pool-on-top-of-car.amp?__twitter_impression=true