Seifer86

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About Seifer86

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  1. Yes, in a vacuum where all things are equal, he'd be right. But that's not the case, not even close. There are so many other factors which impact how the virus survives, spreads, and kills. Things like age, pre-existing conditions, environment, ecosystem, population density and on and on and on.
  2. Your "simple math" assumes that the only factor which dictates the spread and mortality rate of the virus is population size. That is categorically wrong.
  3. Good point on the interest charges for disbursements, though I'd say that disbursements generally stay quite low in the first 2 or 3 years of a claim, so the total charged to the client out of settlement is not often a shocking amount, unless the rate is ridiculous. My experience is somewhat limited to the policies at my firm, but I can see how this could be abused. I completely agree with your middle paragraph.
  4. This is incorrect, and any lawyer who charges 45% contingency is in violation of BC Law Society Rules and should be reported. Lawyers are only allowed to charge a maximum of 33.3% on personal injury claims related to a motor vehicle accident, up to and including trial. An appeal requires a separate contract. https://www.lawsociety.bc.ca/support-and-resources-for-lawyers/act-rules-and-code/law-society-rules/part-8-–-lawyers’-fees/ A move to no-fault insurance does not eliminate fault in an accident. ICBC will still make that determination. No-fault means you can't sue the at-fault party for damages related to your injury (pain and suffering, wage loss, future care, capacity, in-trust claims etc). How ICBC determines rate increases based on fault is completely up to them. Make no mistake, the move to this system will save you money, but only if you are never seriously injured in an accident. This is how insurance works, you only want it when you need it. The elimination of legal representation means there are really only 3 parties involved in your accident now, you, ICBC, and your doctors. ICBC has stated that they will work with your doctor to help establish your true losses and compensate you accordingly. I pose the question: does your doctor have the time, expertise, or inclination to deal with an ICBC adjuster on your behalf?
  5. are you a ffviii fan lol?