bluesy_shoes

Members
  • Content count

    237
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

137 Good

About bluesy_shoes

  • Rank
    Comets Prospect

Contact Methods

  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Coquitlam
  1. Complaining about your defensive d-man always starting the breakout kind of ignores the fact that he was a big factor in the turnover. The first forechecker will always hound on the guy starting from a standstill behind the net. Carrying the puck through the first forechecker as the last man back is a dangerous play unless you are a #1D (or a PMD who probably wouldn't be on the ice in the first place in Tanev's shutdown role) You're asking too much from him, he's fantastic in his role. You should be on Edler for not being able to turn a 4 on 4 situation (remember Tanev took care of his forechecker)
  2. I forget what interview it was, but he mentioned that he didn't see a need to draft offensive defensemen because he had subban and hutton as prospects. i haven't heard him talk at length though. Its probably because there's no debate he is going to Utica. He may not see Subban as a future core player as his lack of size and reach is a huge obstacle in him becoming an efficient, all-situations, minute eating defenseman. He's going to have to work harder than everyone else on the ice.
  3. I only looked at d-men. I like Brandon Carlo at 23. Out of the offensive D-men that I viewed, it looks only like Dunn has a chance of being an NHLer. Dunn got my second vote. With him, it looks like strength will be an issue. I'd wait for a higher draft pick to draft a player like Dunn, there's a lot of risk with him because he's not really undersized, but he struggles in front of the net and on the boards. We will have higher picks in the years to come. The rest of the d-men i watched are d-zone floaters, look totally lost, little structure. Carlo because he could be a big minute d-man. Every team needs a rock back there, and he's a good one.
  4. This is what is so wrong with this team. "I'm here to stay; I'll go down with the ship:" the veterans are all halfway to retirement, and they are content with that. No one wants to win anymore.
  5. My two cents: he's looking for players with great physical tools that can be coached to play within a tight checking system. He's not looking for players like the Sedins, for example. They are incredibly talented players in their offensive creativity, but they are not very coachable. They have to play their own way to be successful, and this hurts the team concept. Coaches give them the most offensively productive minutes because they are wasted when they don't have the puck, and these are the players who eat up the most of your salary cap. The rest of the lineup has to eat up the harder minutes, play a different style than the team leaders, all while getting payed less with less opportunity to create the offence for which their leaders are so highly valued. Players like Virtanen, McCann, Tryamkin, and Horvat (I think it is fair to add Horvat to this list because they seem to be giving his development priority) they all have great physical tools in their size, skating, speed, passing, and shooting. For a strong team concept, you need all your players to have those qualities in order to play within any system at a high level. They also must be role players willingly, and be disciplined enough to adhere to the system. Who they don't need to be are wizards with the puck, or think the game better than the rest of their teammates. (In fact, the only player who does need to be a wizard is your goalie, which is why I am happy he drafted Demko, despite the general feeling goalies are wasted draft picks) Benning has said that he wants a team who can adapt stylistically to who they are playing against ("compete physically with teams like LA, and keep up with fast teams like Chicago") so it sounds like he values coaching and systems over offensive gamebreakers.
  6. if jake plays in the NHL next year, what's his cap hit?
  7. At this point, getting benched and scratched just means rest. I think Team Canada sees Virtanen as a gamebreaker for their bottom 6. He's a tournament rookie so he won't get top 6 time, but he has a history with Team Canada that precedes this tournament, and he honestly probably earned his spot on this team last year. He's a player that I think they see as affording them scoring depth, and they are going to deploy him that way. I know he's been saying that he's willing to be a role player, but to me I think they know his skill set, and they just want him to go out on the ice and play his explosive game. They're hoping they have him next year as a cornerstone in their top six.
  8. I really like Bo at 4C on this Desjardins team. It's clear Desjardins takes advantage of the high energy available in four lines, and I think from a team standpoint, they can use a B option shutdown centre (to Richardson's A game) throughout the regular season. Not just for when Richardson is injured, but when he isn't rested. Bo's the best player for that, and I think Richardson is a great cushion to nurture his development. From watching Bo as a player, I don't think his offensive game would improve much in junior. This is my opinion, not Benning's obviously , so we'll see where he ends up. Sure he might develop more puck on stick skills, but I don't believe he will evolve his vision or his transition game more towards the NHL game. IMO, he'll never be a first line offensive player (as I am sure you'd agree) and my reasoning is that, from my viewings, he lets the play come to him. He is a really heady, reactionary player, and his offense will always come from transition. He doesn't break down the opposition guard, his game is catching them off guard and gaining that step. Purely a shutdown player, maybe elite. Again, we'll see.
  9. so if he was born one month later? if he managed to have the season he had last year as a draft -1 player, i'd think he would be someone the media considered as someone to watch as a potential riser into the 5-10 range. He would need to generate more team success.
  10. Tanev just needs some powerplay time. He's never had the opportunity to build enough confidence to take risks in the offensive zone at the NHL level. It's in my opinion (and one of the reasons I like him as a defenseman) is that he always plays confidently, but that means he always makes what he recognizes as the high percentage, or "sure," play. I think if he is put on the powerplay, where an interception doesn't mean an odd-man rush, he'll learn the dynamics of the offensive zone much better and start to make more plays at even strength. FYI, Tanev was tied for first among defenseman with 5 even strength goals last season, and his only other goal came shorthanded. (He had no powerplay goals.) Visit this link, his goals are offensive-minded plays: jumping into the slot or up on the rush, or delaying and taking his time to think and shoot through lanes.
  11. It takes time to get used to your mirrors, but I have better vision in my van than I do on my cycle at this point. Edit: and its just important to realize driving is something you can get very good at and always improve, and realizing that it is dangerous is a good sign. I grew up driving in the suburbs, and I drove way too fast for my skill level. Driving in the city is very difficult, and the biggest safety factor is how well you know the roads and how well you plan your route.
  12. Try riding a bicycle in traffic. If you can get used to that, driving will be a breeze.
  13. Horvat will earn his icetime with his ability to outbattle players. If you are matched up against first line players, you will be getting ~20 minutes a night, and those are top six minutes. From what I've seen of him, if he is on the powerplay, it will be to win faceoffs, to win puck battles down low, and to battle in front of the net. If he does play on the powerplay, he will definitely be a top six forward. Like I was saying before, it is better to think of drafting in terms of TOI and not conventional first line, second line, third line players. Kesler had more TOI per game than Henrik Sedin in 3 of the last 4 seasons. Henrik was indeed our "first line centre," but i would argue that the player who is on the ice more is the player who is more important to team success.
  14. Top six... First liner... Bottom six... People have to forget about that kind of line-up structure. Smart drafting is all about TOI and salary cap. Benning and Co. have stated that Horvat looks to be an important player for our team as a shutdown player. He's got no quit, he is a heavy player, and he is smart enough and has enough skill to play in the NHL. Not too many people are saying he is a career AHLer. What he needs to do (as has been stated) is improve his game pace. He is playing heavy minutes at the junior level, and where he fits in at the NHL level is against top players. He has to be able to keep up with and outbattle dynamic players like Getzlaf, Kopitar, Kane, Toews, Kesler... that's his calling. The OHL is a jog compared to the sprint in the NHL. The talk of his offensive development is overblown and a misunderstanding. His projected role at the NHL level is invaluable to a winning team, and acquiring players of that caliber within their role is difficult outside of the draft. Rarely do you see core players in that mold get traded. Watching him play at the WJC's is the most telling. Fans were disappointed at his lack of dynamism and creativity. But he was a plus player who rarely made a mistake, and his line won the match-ups against the opposition's best. The most important thing for Horvat is, in all honesty, his defensive development. That is his game, and he won't get any farther with that in juniors. He would be pacing himself against teenagers. Whether or not he produces big numbers, he looks to be a player to be a safe bet to play his role and win his matchup. This summer needs to be cardio, cardio, cardio.
  15. Does anyone think playing in your hometown is a drawback? It's a lot easier to have a life outside of the rink.