WeatherWise

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WeatherWise last won the day on May 9 2014

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  1. This is the first time he has ever been on stage with a draft selection. He is also the one to present him with the hat.
  2. The 2017 NHL Draft is now only three weeks away and teams have begun to finalize their draft lists. At the top of the draft class, the common names among forwards featured on most draft lists include Nico Hischier, Nolan Patrick, Gabriel Vilardi, Casey Mittelstadt, Cody Glass, and Martin Necas. One player who has polarized draft observers is Elias Pettersson, a 6'2'', 165 lbs forward who plays for Timra IK of Sweden's second-tier men's league, the Allsvenskan. Some believe that he should be considered among that top group of players, while others are more skeptical. While some have lauded Pettersson's stickhandling abilities and vision, his game possesses numerous faults as well, many of which revolve around the lack of grit and power in his game. Unlike Nico Hischier, Cody Glass, and Martin Necas -- each player being approximately one dozen pounds heavier than Elias -- he currently struggles along the boards and is a particularly ineffective forechecker relative to the other aforementioned players. He does not battle the way that the others do. This season, he was a prolific offensive threat with Timra IK of Sweden's second-tier men's league Allsvenskan, scoring 19 goals, 22 assists, 41 points in 43 games; the Allsvenskan uses international dimensions for its rinks, however, and so the extra room on the ice for Pettersson to operate has potentially been very beneficial to his game. On the smaller North American-sized ice, Pettersson has up to this point been somewhat less effective against peers of his own age group. At the 2016 IIHF U18 World Championships as one of the older players, he scored 1 goal, 7 assists, 8 points in 7 games but had just 2 points in the three medal round games and no points in the Gold Medal match; at the 2017 IIHF U20 World Championships, he was held to 0 goals, 1 assist, 1 point in 6 games. He does not possess the quickest first two steps, but Pettersson's top speed is very good. His forechecking ability, however, is much less impressive than that of Glass, Hischier, and Necas. While he possesses excellent skill, his place on the various draft rankings currently ranges from #5 to #27. It would be fair to express some reservations about this player, but his puck skills could cause some teams to covet him at a high draft position. Not everyone has had the opportunity to watch this player, nor other draft-eligible players. To give viewers a sense of his performance on North American ice, I have developed a package consisting of several games from his 2017 U20 and 2016 U18 tournament appearances: all shifts from five of Pettersson's matches with Team Sweden during the past calendar year. Nobody is expected to watch all of it, although you are welcome to watch as much footage as you like. I have simply prepared the footage for those who are curious enough to examine the player's game, and I have offered a large enough sample size to give people an accurate depiction of the way he plays. The presentation is divided into six segments -- one segment for each match. You may watch all of it, or just some of it. The games featured here (and their corresponding start times in the video) are: 2016 IIHF U18 World Championship (Pettersson wears #21): (0:15) 2016-04-24: Team Sweden vs Team Finland (Championship Match) 2017 IIHF U20 World Championship (Pettersson wears #14): (22:06) 2016-12-26: Team Sweden vs Team Denmark (38:27) 2016-12-28: Team Sweden vs Team Switzerland (56:18) 2016-12-29: Team Sweden vs Team Finland (1:09:05) 2017-01-04: Team Sweden vs Team Canada (Semifinal Match) The games here were chosen due to the many questions that people have had about Pettersson's ability to perform on the North American-sized ice surface, as well as due to conflicting reports about the quality of his play at the 2017 IIHF U20 World Championships. One can formulate their own opinion by observing and analyzing his performances here. This package features two elimination matches (vs Team Finland, Team Canada) and three round robin matches (vs Team Denmark, Team Switzerland, Team Finland). All of these matches take place on North American-sized rinks, and all of them feature Pettersson playing with and against players of his own age group. While he records no points during the matches featured in this package, what matters most of all is the way in which he plays in these games from shift to shift. The games are featured chronologically in the video. Hopefully, this offers viewers an informative look at one of the top eligible players for the 2017 NHL Draft, Elias Pettersson. As always, comments and discussion are appreciated and encouraged. Enjoy.
  3. The 2017 NHL Draft is now only three weeks away and teams have begun to finalize their draft lists. At the top of the draft class, the common names among forwards featured on most draft lists include Nico Hischier, Nolan Patrick, Gabriel Vilardi, Casey Mittelstadt, Cody Glass, and Martin Necas. One player who has polarized draft observers is Elias Pettersson, a 6'2'', 165 lbs forward who plays for Timra IK of Sweden's second-tier men's league, the Allsvenskan. Some believe that he should be considered among that top group of players, while others are more skeptical. While some have lauded Pettersson's stickhandling abilities and vision, his game possesses numerous faults as well, many of which revolve around the lack of grit and power in his game. Unlike Nico Hischier, Cody Glass, and Martin Necas -- each player being approximately one dozen pounds heavier than Elias -- he currently struggles along the boards and is a particularly ineffective forechecker relative to the other aforementioned players. He does not battle the way that the others do. This season, he was a prolific offensive threat with Timra IK of Sweden's second-tier men's league Allsvenskan, scoring 19 goals, 22 assists, 41 points in 43 games; the Allsvenskan uses international dimensions for its rinks, however, and so the extra room on the ice for Pettersson to operate has potentially been very beneficial to his game. On the smaller North American-sized ice, Pettersson has up to this point been somewhat less effective against peers of his own age group. At the 2016 IIHF U18 World Championships as one of the older players, he scored 1 goal, 7 assists, 8 points in 7 games but had just 2 points in the three medal round games and no points in the Gold Medal match; at the 2017 IIHF U20 World Championships, he was held to 0 goals, 1 assist, 1 point in 6 games. He does not possess the quickest first two steps, but Pettersson's top speed is very good. His forechecking ability, however, is much less impressive than that of Glass, Hischier, and Necas. While he possesses excellent skill, his place on the various draft rankings currently ranges from #5 to #27. It would be fair to express some reservations about this player, but his puck skills could cause some teams to covet him at a high draft position. Not everyone has had the opportunity to watch this player, nor other draft-eligible players. To give viewers a sense of his performance on North American ice, I have developed a package consisting of several games from his 2017 U20 and 2016 U18 tournament appearances: all shifts from five of Pettersson's matches with Team Sweden during the past calendar year. Nobody is expected to watch all of it, although you are welcome to watch as much footage as you like. I have simply prepared the footage for those who are curious enough to examine the player's game, and I have offered a large enough sample size to give people an accurate depiction of the way he plays. The presentation is divided into six segments -- one segment for each match. You may watch all of it, or just some of it. The games featured here (and their corresponding start times in the video) are: 2016 IIHF U18 World Championship (Pettersson wears #21): (0:15) 2016-04-24: Team Sweden vs Team Finland (Championship Match) 2017 IIHF U20 World Championship (Pettersson wears #14): (22:06) 2016-12-26: Team Sweden vs Team Denmark (38:27) 2016-12-28: Team Sweden vs Team Switzerland (56:18) 2016-12-29: Team Sweden vs Team Finland (1:09:05) 2017-01-04: Team Sweden vs Team Canada (Semifinal Match) The games here were chosen due to the many questions that people have had about Pettersson's ability to perform on the North American-sized ice surface, as well as due to conflicting reports about the quality of his play at the 2017 IIHF U20 World Championships. One can formulate their own opinion by observing and analyzing his performances here. This package features two elimination matches (vs Team Finland, Team Canada) and three round robin matches (vs Team Denmark, Team Switzerland, Team Finland). All of these matches take place on North American-sized rinks, and all of them feature Pettersson playing with and against players of his own age group. While he records no points during the matches featured in this package, what matters most of all is the way in which he plays in these games from shift to shift. The games are featured chronologically in the video. Hopefully, this offers viewers an informative look at one of the top eligible players for the 2017 NHL Draft, Elias Pettersson. As always, comments and discussion are appreciated and encouraged. Enjoy.
  4. Pettersson and Necas are different players. Necas is a speedster who always plays the game at a high tempo. He races around the ice looking to forecheck and open up space with his speed. There isn't much finesse in his game, but there is a lot of speed, and he is a competent playmaker. Some have criticized him for staying too much along the perimeter at times, as one of his primary strategies is to skate around the outside looking to create passing lanes. There is more grit in his game than there is in Pettersson's, as there are times when he can crash and bang along the boards and play a bit of a grinding game. That said, he is still rather light and shied away from that type of game at times this year. Pettersson is a finesse player whose first few steps aren't particularly explosive. He seemed slower this year than he did last season, but his speed is fairly good. He isn't a physical player, nor is there any power in his game. He doesn't win a lot of battles along the boards -- even last year at the U18s when he was one of the oldest players in the tournament, he could only maintain his ground along the boards, but did not win too many battles. In fact, one of his greatest problems against older competition is his lack of ability to stay on his skates; he needs to work on his balance. He possesses great puck skills, however, and has very good vision. Necas measured at 6'1'', 178 lbs yesterday. Pettersson measured at 6'1.75'', 165 lbs. Here is some footage from one of Pettersson's performances this season with Timra IK, courtesy of ihaveyuidonttouchme; he is #14 in white:
  5. bigwhite06 (Feebster on HF) has just released his Gabriel Vilardi 2016-17 highlight package: Gabe is one of my favorites of this draft class. As I have said many times before, if his skating was any better, he would be a legitimate candidate to be chosen first overall.
  6. bigwhite06 (Feebster on HF) has just released his Gabriel Vilardi 2016-17 highlight package: Gabe is one of my favorites of this draft class. As I have said many times before, if his skating was any better, he would be a legitimate candidate to be chosen first overall.
  7. bigwhite06 (Feebster on HF) has just released his Gabriel Vilardi 2016-17 highlight package: Gabe is one of my favorites of this draft class. As I have said many times before, if his skating was any better, he would be a legitimate candidate to be chosen first overall. Edit : I see that this has been posted!
  8. There is not a lot of versatility or diversity in Tippett's game. It would be fair to call him a low-IQ player. He possesses no east-west game and relies heavily on moving the puck up the ice with speed, so by definition he is a north-south player. I have seen some people compare him to Jake Virtanen, but this is a poor comparison. He is much more explosive than a player like Jake Virtanen and isn't quite as physical. They are not the same type of player in some respects, as Virtanen is more of a power forward while Tippett is more of a speedster with a sprinkle, albeit not a lot, of power. Tippett's game is all about getting the puck into the middle of the ice, whether he is the one taking it into the middle with the puck on his stick, or passing it into the middle. His work along the boards and his cycle game are somewhat limited, as his mindset is always to get the puck into a prime shooting area above the goal line rather than to move it around the zone to open up space. He loves to gather speed and take it up the ice himself; he is shifty and explosive enough to move it quickly and beat players one-on-one, and can explode from a standstill to beat a player one-on-one in the offensive zone. If a defenceman is caught flat-footed, he'll speed right by them. His skating ability is dynamic, unlike Virtanen who lacks acceleration and shiftiness, and whose game was based around bulldozing to the net with strength. Tippett also has a tendency to shoot the puck from low-percentage areas when the other team fails to give him space to skate or pass the puck into the middle. Rather than dump the puck in, he'll launch the puck from his stick and try to force it on net. As of right now, he is rather one-dimensional. His shot is terrific, and his skating ability is excellent. He may have the best shot in the entire draft class; his goal totals this season attest to that, as his shot has often beaten goaltenders in the OHL. However, at the NHL level these kinds of plays tend to be contained due to the defensive discipline and skill of the opposition. He has only a small number of plays in his arsenal and he forces them several times a game. There isn't much more to his game than his rushes, his desire to move the puck into the middle, and his shot. He is a project and a high-risk pick because his game revolves around a very limited set of talents and not a lot of hockey sense or poise. Unless a team wants to commit themselves to rounding out his game and teaching him other offensive elements, they will likely pass on him. His play away from the puck is poor, and his defensive decision-making has sometimes been called into question. He possesses no cycle game; puck-movement in the offensive zone tends to die on his stick. He is a better skater than Nail Yakupov, but he has the same kind of risk associated with him -- a limited, underdeveloped offensive mindset. Here is footage from one of his performances this season; he wears #74 in blue:
  9. If you've never seen these players play, you can watch some of their full performances here; the Glass and Vilardi packages feature shift-by-shift footage of six of their 2016-17 CHL matches that were played between January and March 2017; the Mittelstadt package is from a Minnesota State High School League match in February 2017 against the Minnetonka Skippers: Vilardi wears #13 for the Windsor Spitfires: Glass wears #8 for the Portland Winterhawks: Mittelstadt wears #11 for the Eden Prairie Eagles (wearing dark in this match):
  10. The 7:30 AM group was accidentally measured with their shoes on. The heights needed to be revised.
  11. http://thehockeywriters.com/2017-nhl-combine-heights-weights/ Some of the measurements in order from shortest to tallest: Eeli Tolvanen: 5-foot-10.5, 189.48 pounds Nick Suzuki: 5-foot-11, 183.2 pounds Lias Andersson: 5-foot-11, 200.68 pounds Cale Makar: 5-foot-11.25, 187.44 pounds Timothy Liljegren: 5-foot-11.5 (source: Grant McCagg [1]) Casey Mittelstadt: 5-foot-11.5, 198.98 pounds Owen Tippett: 6-foot-0.5, 202.76 pounds Miro Heiskanen: 6-foot-0.75, 172.16 pounds Martin Necas: 6-foot-1, 178.34 pounds Nico Hischier: 6-foot-1.5, 178.55 pounds Elias Pettersson: 6-foot-1.75, 164.62 pounds Cody Glass: 6-foot-1.75, 177.86 pounds Nolan Patrick: 6-foot-2, 198.82 pounds Gabriel Vilardi: 6-foot-2.75, 202.8 pounds Kristian Vesalainen: 6-foot-3.75, 209.22 pounds Michael Rasmussen: 6-foot-5.5, 221.22 pounds The 7:30 AM group was accidentally measured with their shoes on. The heights needed to be revised.
  12. With the 2017 NHL Draft only weeks away from taking place, the attention given to many of this year's top draft-eligible players has reached an all-time high. Several players featured at the top of the draft class have already received some degree of nationwide exposure through numerous television broadcasts of their games. Aside from a brief appearance at the 2017 U18 World Championships in Slovakia, Glass has been given less airtime than some of the others. Consequently, I felt that it would be worthwhile to develop a scouting package focused on Glass so that people could have an extended opportunity to analyze his game and formulate their own opinions. Glass has risen on many draft lists throughout the 2016-17 season. After scoring only 27 points in 2015-16, Glass broke out with 32 goals, 62 assists, 94 points in 69 games with the Portland Winterhawks in 2016-17 on a line with teammates Skyler McKenzie and Keegan Iverson. Cody Glass is a playmaker first and foremost above all else. Standing at 6'2'', 178 lbs and hailing from a family of tall gentlemen, many believe that he may not be finished growing; he would also benefit from becoming heavier, as currently he tends to be pushed off of the puck too easily. He uses his edges fairly well and is a patient player. When he has the puck, he knows exactly who he can pass the puck to, and possesses the vision to identify open teammates and execute skilled passes. His acceleration is average and his first two steps don't get him very far, although he can gain adequate speed to race for a loose puck. His ability to anticipate is terrific. He gauges where to be to put pressure on the opposition and strip the puck away or beat them to it. In the offensive zone, he tends to move around looking to make himself available and to support the puck along the boards, although his favorite spot to be when his team is set up is in the slot as a shooter and at the goal line. Any time he has the puck, he considers his options and demonstrates poise with the puck. He has a good shot. If there is one complaint to be made about his game, it's that he lacks physicality and isn't aggressive in the physical sense; on the forecheck, he relies on smart, active positioning and posturing to beat opponents to the puck, and he has a long enough reach to pull it away from them and move it while under pressure. One might also conclude that his puck skills are a little bit lacking compared to Gabriel Vilardi and Casey Mittelstadt. He is not as shifty individually as those two; he is more of a simple passer and shooter than a dangler. One would not be wrong to characterize his game as "vanilla." Not everyone has had the opportunity to watch this player, nor other draft-eligible players. Therefore, I have developed a comprehensive scouting package based on Glass' 2016-17 season: all shifts from six games played between January and March 2017. Nobody is expected to watch all of it, although you are welcome to watch as much footage as you like. I have simply prepared the footage for those who are curious enough to examine the player's game, and I have offered a large enough sample size to give people an accurate depiction of the way he plays. The presentation is divided into six segments -- one segment for each match. You may watch all of it, or just some of it. The games featured here (and their corresponding start times in the video) are: (0:15) January 13, 2017: Portland Winterhawks vs Spokane Chiefs (23:52) January 17, 2017: Portland Winterhawks @ Prince George Cougars (46:56) February 11, 2017: Portland Winterhawks @ Seattle Thunderbirds (1:10:02) February 17, 2017: Portland Winterhawks vs Red Deer Rebels (1:34:22) March 1, 2017: Portland Winterhawks @ Vancouver Giants (1:55:52) March 3, 2017: Portland Winterhawks vs Vancouver Giants Featured here are games of all varieties, from multi-point games to those in which this player did not record any points. Three away games, and three home games were chosen for this package. The opponents range from the Vancouver Giants, who were the 21st-ranked team to the Seattle Thunderbirds, who were the 2017 Western Hockey League Champions and the 4th-placed team during the 2016-17 WHL regular season. The Prince George Cougars were the 5th-placed team in the league, while the Red Deer Rebels and Spokane Chiefs were the 12th-placed and 17th-placed team in the league, respectively. The Thunderbirds, Cougars, and Rebels qualified for the WHL playoffs. The team that Glass played for this season, the Portland Winterhawks, were the 13th-placed team in the WHL. What matters most of all is the way in which Glass plays in these games from shift to shift. Some of these performances are stronger than others -- I would say that patience pays off for viewers here. The games are featured chronologically in the video. Hopefully, this offers viewers an informative look at one of the top eligible players for the 2017 NHL Draft, Cody Glass. As always, comments and discussion are appreciated and encouraged. Enjoy.