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Darcy Rota

Rick Rypien Passes Away

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Someone extremely close to me suffers from anxiety and depression.

Mental illness is common and, unfortunately, often goes undiagnosed and untreated. It is a life sentence... something that cannot be clinically "cured". It doesn't go away like a virus or an infection. It can be controlled through medication and therapy, though.

Often, when people are diagnosed with a mental illness, they don't seek treatment because of the social stigma attached to it. Sufferers often think of themselves as pariahs or burdens to their loved ones. This is so sad to me because I cannot begin to think of life without my closest loved one who suffers from mental illness.

If you know someone who is mentally ill, give them all the love, attention and understanding that you can. Spend time with them and tell them that you love them often.

Finally, please stop all the speculation and smart ass remarks that are being made regarding Rick Rypien's passing. This particular thread is not a place for jokes, one-liners and ignorant comments. Show R.R. some respect and show his loved ones some empathy, instead.

Regardless of how you feel about suicide or mental illness, please think about who you might hurt before you push the post button.

Rest Peacefully, Ripper.

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Judge not those who hurt to much to stay

Those who grow weary of lifes load

The cloke of gloom is burdensome

The hurt and pain natural eyes cannot see

No judge not those who purposely leave

Let us listen to one another with sharpened ear

Speak with affirmation

Love without expectation

And let us lift the fallen cheer the faint

Too soon gone he is

Yet remember him not for his untimely passing

But remember his person.

Some where on a sheet of silver

Glides a young man always smiling

Like a bird released from his cage

Never with regret looking back

RIP Rick Rypien. Forever a Canuck #37.

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Judge not those who hurt to much to stay

Those who grow weary of lifes load

The cloke of gloom is burdensome

The hurt and pain natural eyes cannot see

No judge not those who purposely leave

Let us listen to one another with sharpened ear

Speak with affirmation

Love without expectation

And let us lift the fallen cheer the faint

Too soon gone he is

Yet remember him not for his untimely passing

But remember his person.

Some where on a sheet of silver

Glides a young man always smiling

Like a bird released from his cage

Never with regret looking back

RIP Rick Rypien. Forever a Canuck #37.

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RIP Rypper. A sad, sad day.

I can't believe how callous some people can be. It's really disappointing.

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Rick Rypien was adept at using both fists,unfortunately, they lost in the end with his personal battle with depression.A great teamate and competitor (especially loved by AV).....RIP RR.

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really really sad news....

i was at the gym, and it showed his birthday-passing day caption on the TV. i was in absolute shock..

absolutely ruined my day.. soooo sad, one of my fav canucks.. 

 RIP Ripper, you will be dearly missed. :(

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Do a search and find the Chris Benoit thread. and you guys bash him and call him names and coward, yet he had issues and killed himself, but sadly he also took his wife and kids life too. But it was proven, that Doctors point to "tangible evidence" that ex-wrestler Chris Benoit suffered from a dementia that so impaired his judgement that he killed his wife and son before taking his own life.

But because he isn't associated with the Canucks, you all totally bashed him.

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Do a search and find the Chris Benoit thread. and you guys bash him and call him names and coward, yet he had issues and killed himself, but sadly he also took his wife and kids life too. But it was proven, that Doctors point to "tangible evidence" that ex-wrestler Chris Benoit suffered from a dementia that so impaired his judgement that he killed his wife and son before taking his own life.

But because he isn't associated with the Canucks, you all totally bashed him.

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Dan Murphy's take on Rypien:

http://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/2011/08/16/murphy_ripien/

Rick Rypien was a legendary pugilist who was unable to win the battle with his own demons.

I woke up overseas this morning to the terribly sad news that Rick Rypien had passed. I'm sure much will be written over the next few days about the former Canuck, and written by those who are much more eloquent than myself, but I still felt compelled to pass on my memories of an incredibly tough kid everyone called, "Ryp".

Rypien was already a bit of a legend when he was first called up by the Canucks. And by that I mean within the organization. Sure many in the AHL knew about him, but he was still an unknown quantity as far as NHLers were concerned.

It's said that Rypien, who was mentored by Mike Keane while with the Moose, would go after anyone who even raised an eyebrow at the decorated veteran.

"No big deal," I thought.

Until I met Rick and saw he was under 6' tall and about 175 pounds. Rypien came to the Canucks with the reputation that he would take on all comers. It didn't matter how big or how tough the opponent, Rypien always wanted to prove himself.

As everyone knows, Rypien's years in pro hockey were littered with injuries. But this was not a frail kid. Once he was called up by the Canucks and Alain Vigneault forbid Rypien to fight as he was recovering from a broken hand. On his first shift Rypien crushed an Avs player with a questionable hit on the forcheck and was quickly crowded by Ian Lapperierre. You could see Rypien wanted to follow orders - for about two seconds - and then accepted the offer to what turned out to be a very spirited scrap. Post-game, Laperierre (one of the most honest players to ever play the game) said he appreciated him taking the scrap despite the injury and you could tell he also greatly respected Rypien for it. As for Alain Vigneault, all he could do was shrug his shoulders and say, "that's Ryp."

On the ice, Rick was all about his teammates. He loved to stick up for them. And you'd have to guess that's why the Canucks stood up for him over the last few years when he was trying to overcome his demons. The Canucks loved his work ethic, the way he battled and tirelessly fought to get back into top shape injury after injury.

One year, Rypien showed up at prospects camp even though I'm pretty sure he wasn't required to. Rypien set the pace in the drills and conditioning, setting an example to the younger players in attendance. He would crush the Grouse Grind in 37 minutes while the rest of the prospects were labouring in towards the 50-60 minute mark and then encourage them up. Thus supporting them while also showing them how hard they would need to work in order to get into proper shape.

Rick was a great teammate. Ask anyone. In fact two years back goaltender Josh Harding called Rypien the best captain he ever had (the two played together in Regina). Remember, Harding said this when he had already been in the NHL for a number of years. That is a great compliment.

I'll smile when I think of Rypien. It's tough not to when you look back on some of memorable moments with the Canucks. Like when he took on Hal Gill or Boris Valabik despite the fact he was giving up more than six inches and 50 pounds to each of them. Or when he went toe-to-toe with Cam Janssens last season. Or the memorable three fights he had with Brandon Prust in one game when Prust was a member of the Calgary Flames.

He was a gifted young man with plenty left to give us. And I was sure that he was going to. I kept in touch with Rick since the end of last season, exchanging the odd text here and there. He was excited about the opportunity to play with the Jets. Turning down two-year deals offered by other clubs to ink a one-year deal with Winnipeg. Why? Because he was sure that he was going to prove himself once again and earn a second year by Christmas.

I truly believed that Rick was on the road to recovery. Obviously I don't know the depth of the issues he was dealing with however it seemed like he was coming out of the darkness. More importantly it seemed like he wanted to beat what was ailing him. The Canucks kept what Rick was going through a closely-guarded secret, and for good reason, because they didn't want to force the young man to talk about his issues until he was ready to. And you know what? He was ready. A few months back he contacted me to help write his story. He was finally open to the idea of speaking about his demons. He wanted other people who may be suffering the same illnesses to know they weren't alone. He knew that because of who he was, that his voice would be heard. It is just so sad that he will never get that chance.

My thoughts and prayers are with the Rypien family.

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Excuse me?

I don't think it's far off to say, he suffered through everyday life with whatever was wrong. Maybe he thought suicide would just get rid of the pain, and do what's best for him. He has family, friends etc, but they're not suffering through daily life. If I was suffering, and depressed, suicide would be an option I'd heavily weigh.

You don't understand what a illness can do to your mind, and life. I guess you'd rather a person with an illness to scrap by a daily life? Sounds pretty terrible to me. Suicide is a terrible thing, but when you scrap by day-to-day, it takes a huge toll on your body and mind. You need to know what Rick had to go through, in order to be so unclassy as a human being by calling him a coward, yet you have zero knowledge what he had to battle through.

Also off-topic a bit, but suicide is never a reason to kill yourself? What if you've been shot and are suffering and you're losing blood quickly? You're not going to suffer so people don't call you a coward when dead, you do it because it's what best for you. Rick decided it's what's best for him.

Like I said, you should maybe get a sense of what people go through before you call them cowards. Pretty tasteless if you ask me.

BTW, I minused you too. You're welcome.

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None of us knew what he was dealing with, so none of us are qualified to judge him ..in the end, each of us has the power to decide for ourselves .. call it cowardly or selfish if you will .. none have the right to judge .. our thoughts should positively focus on his family and loved ones .. and in learning how perhaps we can help those in a similar situation .. lets all truly try to "take a sad song and make it better" ..

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Dan Murphy's take on Rypien:

http://www.sportsnet.../murphy_ripien/

Rick Rypien was a legendary pugilist who was unable to win the battle with his own demons.

I woke up overseas this morning to the terribly sad news that Rick Rypien had passed. I'm sure much will be written over the next few days about the former Canuck, and written by those who are much more eloquent than myself, but I still felt compelled to pass on my memories of an incredibly tough kid everyone called, "Ryp".

Rypien was already a bit of a legend when he was first called up by the Canucks. And by that I mean within the organization. Sure many in the AHL knew about him, but he was still an unknown quantity as far as NHLers were concerned.

It's said that Rypien, who was mentored by Mike Keane while with the Moose, would go after anyone who even raised an eyebrow at the decorated veteran.

"No big deal," I thought.

Until I met Rick and saw he was under 6' tall and about 175 pounds. Rypien came to the Canucks with the reputation that he would take on all comers. It didn't matter how big or how tough the opponent, Rypien always wanted to prove himself.

As everyone knows, Rypien's years in pro hockey were littered with injuries. But this was not a frail kid. Once he was called up by the Canucks and Alain Vigneault forbid Rypien to fight as he was recovering from a broken hand. On his first shift Rypien crushed an Avs player with a questionable hit on the forcheck and was quickly crowded by Ian Lapperierre. You could see Rypien wanted to follow orders - for about two seconds - and then accepted the offer to what turned out to be a very spirited scrap. Post-game, Laperierre (one of the most honest players to ever play the game) said he appreciated him taking the scrap despite the injury and you could tell he also greatly respected Rypien for it. As for Alain Vigneault, all he could do was shrug his shoulders and say, "that's Ryp."

On the ice, Rick was all about his teammates. He loved to stick up for them. And you'd have to guess that's why the Canucks stood up for him over the last few years when he was trying to overcome his demons. The Canucks loved his work ethic, the way he battled and tirelessly fought to get back into top shape injury after injury.

One year, Rypien showed up at prospects camp even though I'm pretty sure he wasn't required to. Rypien set the pace in the drills and conditioning, setting an example to the younger players in attendance. He would crush the Grouse Grind in 37 minutes while the rest of the prospects were labouring in towards the 50-60 minute mark and then encourage them up. Thus supporting them while also showing them how hard they would need to work in order to get into proper shape.

Rick was a great teammate. Ask anyone. In fact two years back goaltender Josh Harding called Rypien the best captain he ever had (the two played together in Regina). Remember, Harding said this when he had already been in the NHL for a number of years. That is a great compliment.

I'll smile when I think of Rypien. It's tough not to when you look back on some of memorable moments with the Canucks. Like when he took on Hal Gill or Boris Valabik despite the fact he was giving up more than six inches and 50 pounds to each of them. Or when he went toe-to-toe with Cam Janssens last season. Or the memorable three fights he had with Brandon Prust in one game when Prust was a member of the Calgary Flames.

He was a gifted young man with plenty left to give us. And I was sure that he was going to. I kept in touch with Rick since the end of last season, exchanging the odd text here and there. He was excited about the opportunity to play with the Jets. Turning down two-year deals offered by other clubs to ink a one-year deal with Winnipeg. Why? Because he was sure that he was going to prove himself once again and earn a second year by Christmas.

I truly believed that Rick was on the road to recovery. Obviously I don't know the depth of the issues he was dealing with however it seemed like he was coming out of the darkness. More importantly it seemed like he wanted to beat what was ailing him. The Canucks kept what Rick was going through a closely-guarded secret, and for good reason, because they didn't want to force the young man to talk about his issues until he was ready to. And you know what? He was ready. A few months back he contacted me to help write his story. He was finally open to the idea of speaking about his demons. He wanted other people who may be suffering the same illnesses to know they weren't alone. He knew that because of who he was, that his voice would be heard. It is just so sad that he will never get that chance.

My thoughts and prayers are with the Rypien family.

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Benoit took other people's lives in the process. No excuses for that, no matter how talented he was in-ring or how much respect he had in the WWE.

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So sad. One of my favourite Canucks, and hands-down the best pound-for-pound fighters in the league. No one could throw a punch like Ripper.

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Another article: http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20110816/bc_rypien_at_peace_110816/20110816/?hub=BritishColumbiaHome

After taking time away from his NHL career to battle personal issues -- rumoured to be linked to depression -- Rick Rypien appeared to be in a good place. The scrappy centre, formerly with the Vancouver Canucks, recently signed with the Winnipeg Jets along with longtime friend Jason Jaffray. He appeared content and at peace and talked about the possibility of winning the Stanley Cup, according to Jaffray.

That is why his sudden death inside his Alberta home Monday has come as such a shock.

"Everyone knew he had some issues that he had to get taken care of last year and he was definitely a new man when he came back and ... he was definitely the happiest I'd even seen him," Jaffray said Tuesday from his home in Olds, Alta.

"We actually had joked around about bringing a Cup back to Winnipeg."

The Jets and Canucks confirmed Rypien's death in statements Monday night. The RCMP in Crowsnest Pass, Alta., said they received a call Monday afternoon concerning a "sudden and non-suspicious" death.

There was no immediate word on the cause of death. Jets assistant general manager Craig Heisinger was expected to discuss Rypien's passing at a news conference Tuesday afternoon at the MTS Centre.

Rypien, who was 27, spent parts of six seasons with the Canucks organization. He played only nine games with Vancouver last season and spent most of the year dealing with personal issues.

Jaffray and Rypien also played together with the Manitoba Moose of the American Hockey League. Jaffray said Rypien did not talk much about his troubles.

"Even being his roommate, and on the road we did pretty much everything together ... he didn't like to talk about that kind of stuff a whole lot," Jaffray said. "And guys knew not to pry because when you did try to pry, he kind of got uncomfortable."

Rypien had signed a one-year deal with the Jets worth US$700,000. He had nine goals, seven assists and 226 penalty minutes over 119 career NHL games with the Canucks.

Although small in stature, Rypien never shied away from a fight.

"He was a guy who wouldn't back down from anyone. He was a guy that was definitely fearless," Jaffray said. "He wasn't one of those tough guys that was just out there to fight.

"The guy could skate 100 miles an hour and he worked extremely hard at becoming a good hockey player."

Don Fehr, the executive director of the NHL Players' Association, said Rypien will be missed.

"All players and NHLPA staff are saddened to learn of Rick's passing," he said in a statement. "He was a respected member of our association and will be greatly missed throughout the hockey community.

"Our sincere condolences go out to Rick's family, friends and many fans."

NHL commissioner Gary Bettman offered similar sentiments.

"The National Hockey League sends its deepest condolences to the family, friends and teammates of Rick Rypien, who played the game with so much energy and emotion and whose passing fills us all with a sense of immeasurable sadness and sorrow," he said.

Fans created a Facebook tribute page shortly after the reports of Rypien's death surfaced, and former and current teammates posted condolences on Twitter.

"R.I.P. to a fellow (No.) 37 sorry to see ya go, nicest guy I played with my time in Vancouver, sorry to see ya go buddy, see ya on the other side," posted former teammate Brad Lukowich.

Former teammate Brendan Morrison also posted a tweet.

"In disbelief about Ripper. Sat beside him in the locker room in Van. Such a good kid with a huge heart Thoughts with his family," Morrison said.

Rypien is the second active NHL player found dead in the off-season. Former New York Rangers enforcer Derek Boogaard died in May due to an accidental mix of alcohol and the painkiller oxycodone.

Rypien -- the cousin of former NFL quarterback Mark Rypien -- left the Canucks on two occasions over three years to deal with undisclosed personal matters.

Rypien, a native of Coleman, Alta., made headlines last October when he pushed a Minnesota Wild fan after leaving the ice following a fight during a game in St. Paul. Rypien was handed a six-game suspension and later apologized for the incident.

Rypien had two assists in 11 games with the Moose last season.

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<br />   I minused you, cause that is the dumbest thing I have ever read.  Suicide the only way out?  Suicide is the cowards way out.  I feel bad for his family and what he was dealing with.  But suicide is for cowards,  never is there a reason that you need to kill yourself.<br />

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<br />Being someone who has lived through losing a close family member recently to suicide I am not sure how to respond to your post ? I guess everyone has their opinions no matter how misguided they are.  What would have been best for The Rypper would have been to still be alive and his family would not have to live through such a senseless act. Let me tell you that taking your life is never the answer. To any person  thinking that this is a possible solution to ones problems I sincerely suggest maybe talking to someone about it before that thought becomes a reality in the final seconds of your life that you can never take back.   <br /><br />You seem to know what Rick was going through by your post , for the rest of us please please , let us in on what you think you know. I am not trying to be disrespectful or antagonistic in any way . I just would like to know if any what reasons you would have to justify suicide?<br />

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<br />   And he had a mental problem that clouded his judgement, so at the time he may not have known what he was doing.  So why does Benoits mental illness cause him to get mocked and people wanting to step all over his grave.  Mental illness is mental illness.<br /><br />    I did say I feel bad for Rypien and his family.  I truely do, and I do hope he is at peace now with whatever it was he was fighting.<br />

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