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key2thecup

Greyhound Bus Beheader Vince Li Allowed Off Institute Grounds Already

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exactly. Zero public safety risk, and there will be a clear benefit for Mr. Li.

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I get it. 0.8% is too high for someone that committed such an extremely violent act. If nothing else, he should never have a full release as a small piece of mind and justice for the victim's family. If for some reason they ever do release him, it shouldn't be any time soon. Obviously, I am totally okay with supervised walks, Your first post just came off a bit too lax in my eyes, but you have cleared up most of that.

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You sure about that

a little something else to read for you.....

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...al-escapee.html

Violent psychiatric patient escapes custody

Last Updated: Thursday, September 28, 2006 | 10:18 AM CT

Police in Manitoba are searching for a man they describe as a violent psychiatric patient, who escaped from custody in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

Police warn that Earl Joey Wiebe, 23, has "violent tendencies," and advise people to use extreme caution and call 911 or the Selkirk RCMP immediately if they see him.

He is described as six feet tall and slim, with short blond hair. He was wearing a blue starter T-shirt, grey track pants with a white stripe and white running shoes.

The resident at the Selkirk Mental Health Centre's four-bed high-security wing escaped from two escorts in the morning while on a medical appointment at the Health Sciences Centre. He was last seen running southbound on Sherbrook Avenue.

In 2000, Wiebe was found not criminally responsible for killing his stepmother, Candis Moizer, in 2000. He slit Moizer's throat and set her bedroom on fire.

Staff followed procedure: health centre CEO

Ken Nattras, CEO of the Selkirk Mental Health Centre, said Thursday his staff was following procedure when they took Wiebe out for a medical appointment.

While Wiebe is still considered to be violent, he was not wearing any handcuffs or other restraints when he was taken to the Health Sciences Centre.

"The manner in which Mr. Wiebe was conveyed to the Health Sciences Centre … was in keeping with our practice that has been in place for many, many years, and has been a practice that has been without incident until yesterday," Nattras said.

Provincial Tory justice critic Kelvin Goertzen said Thursday the province should make immediate changes to how high-risk mental patients are transported, as a result of Wiebe's escape.

Goertzen said it was difficult to understand how a person who has murdered someone can be allowed to walk into one of the busiest hospitals in Winnipeg without any security restraints.

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You sure about that

a little something else to read for you.....

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...al-escapee.html

Violent psychiatric patient escapes custody

Last Updated: Thursday, September 28, 2006 | 10:18 AM CT

Police in Manitoba are searching for a man they describe as a violent psychiatric patient, who escaped from custody in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

Police warn that Earl Joey Wiebe, 23, has "violent tendencies," and advise people to use extreme caution and call 911 or the Selkirk RCMP immediately if they see him.

He is described as six feet tall and slim, with short blond hair. He was wearing a blue starter T-shirt, grey track pants with a white stripe and white running shoes.

The resident at the Selkirk Mental Health Centre's four-bed high-security wing escaped from two escorts in the morning while on a medical appointment at the Health Sciences Centre. He was last seen running southbound on Sherbrook Avenue.

In 2000, Wiebe was found not criminally responsible for killing his stepmother, Candis Moizer, in 2000. He slit Moizer's throat and set her bedroom on fire.

Staff followed procedure: health centre CEO

Ken Nattras, CEO of the Selkirk Mental Health Centre, said Thursday his staff was following procedure when they took Wiebe out for a medical appointment.

While Wiebe is still considered to be violent, he was not wearing any handcuffs or other restraints when he was taken to the Health Sciences Centre.

"The manner in which Mr. Wiebe was conveyed to the Health Sciences Centre … was in keeping with our practice that has been in place for many, many years, and has been a practice that has been without incident until yesterday," Nattras said.

Provincial Tory justice critic Kelvin Goertzen said Thursday the province should make immediate changes to how high-risk mental patients are transported, as a result of Wiebe's escape.

Goertzen said it was difficult to understand how a person who has murdered someone can be allowed to walk into one of the busiest hospitals in Winnipeg without any security restraints.

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Anyway, after saying that, I am being a hypocrite, as I wouldn't want him out and about in my neighbourhood. Just pointing out that the intent of the justice system is meant to rehabilitate rather than punish. Being a bit of a Devil's advocate.

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I wonder how difficult it must be for him to stomach what he did during days when he's normal.

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In a decision released Thursday, the review board ruled that Li be allowed supervised passes to Selkirk, starting at 30 minutes in duration and increasing incrementally to a full day

So where does this incrementaion take us? To eventual release? I have to agree with Shift-4, to much of a chance he goes off his meds to be trusted.

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"Miraculous recovery", my ass.

"Miraculous" til he decides not to take his meds and some other poor innocent bystander pays the price for it.

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I wonder how difficult it must be for him to stomach what he did during days when he's normal.

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Instead of all the bickering, why don't we trust the medical experts who came to this decision? They clearly know much more than any of us, and unless anyone here is an expert, we should trust their decision. Yes, we are all entitled to opinions, but lets put our trust in experts who are certified to come to these decisions. If they feel he is in good enough mental shape to be released slowly, then so be it.

It was a horrible and gruesome incident. But seriously, how often does this happen? We are acting like it happens all the time. The people involved in the case obviously know of the risks that can arise from releasing Mr. Li. But with that in mind, they came to a decision because of his progression that they are much more intimate with than we are.

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Instead of all the bickering, why don't we trust the medical experts who came to this decision? They clearly know much more than any of us, and unless anyone here is an expert, we should trust their decision. Yes, we are all entitled to opinions, but lets put our trust in experts who are certified to come to these decisions. If they feel he is in good enough mental shape to be released slowly, then so be it.

It was a horrible and gruesome incident. But seriously, how often does this happen? We are acting like it happens all the time. The people involved in the case obviously know of the risks that can arise from releasing Mr. Li. But with that in mind, they came to a decision because of his progression that they are much more intimate with than we are.

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frack this noise. Hope someone from Tim's family or close friends don't read this article and find him during one of these strolls. He ended a young guys life which was just beginning. Let him rot in the psych ward. Why "encourage" this nutbar to live a normal healthy life after taking one? The McLean family must be furious.

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I think you'd feel different if you were a young girl and Tim McLean was your boyfriend, or if you were a parent and Tim was your son, or if Tim was your sibling, or maybe Tim was your best friend since elementary school.

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If the mental health system in Canada has any sense, there will be checks and balances, he will likely be required to see mental health experts very regularly on top of his continued treatment for his condition. If he stopped taking his medication, it wouldn't be long before these people noticed and he was placed back into an institution. The article says very clearly, the people working with him consider him a very low risk to ever re-offend 0.8% chance according to the risk assessment. And all of this only matters if he is given a full release, which he is not as of now.

With all the Mental health awareness campaigns on TV, on the Canucks websites, on the radio. People still don't get it.

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I think you'd feel different if you were a young girl and Tim McLean was your boyfriend, or if you were a parent and Tim was your son, or if Tim was your sibling, or maybe Tim was your best friend since elementary school.

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I wonder how difficult it must be for him to stomach what he did during days when he's normal.

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I don't mind him being released. I don't love the idea, but he is a person and has the right to advance past this part of his life and move on (to an extent). Other killers move on and live regular (as close as possible), non-violent lives, and he should share this same right.

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Hopefully he moves to Vancouver a city big enough where he can keep anonymous

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