Jump to content

Welcome to canucks.com Vancouver Canucks homepage

Photo

Protesters Storm Montreal University, Gang Up On Students In Class


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
103 replies to this topic

#91 Guest_BuckFoston_*

Guest_BuckFoston_*
  • Guests
  • Joined: --

Posted 09 June 2012 - 08:41 AM

Free tuition is a moronic idea? Really? I guess Swedes and Norwegians are a bunch of morons then. At least the Norwegian morons were smart enough to make money from their oil, unlike Canada. Albertan geniuses were too smart for that, so they got into the federal government and let more oil flow over the borders under lower taxes and tiny royalties. Tell me how you're concerned about money leaving the country again.


Actually pretty much all of Europe has free education, it's just a lot harder to get in because of it, where as here and in the States they will take anyone who has the money to pay for it, regardless of them being an A student or a D student. Because of that, when I was a TA, I used to get first year kids who wrote essays in text speak and didn't know any words consisting of more than 4 or 5 letters. The stupidity was really overwhelming. Also, when I studied in Ottawa most straight A students had scholarships. You rarely get a full ride for a Bachelors, but my Masters was completely free and I didn't have to work on the side either. Obviously no one with a C average is going to get a scholarship, but I think in that case this kind of education should start at the high school level if not earlier so people know exactly what they are getting themselves into.

So while free education is a great idea, what is moronic is storming classrooms of other students who want to sit there and learn, regardless of whether they agree with the protests or not. Maybe they do, but still feel it important to stay in class as they don't want to ruin their grades or worse end up in jail if cops start grabbing people unceremoniously. Then they or their families have to pay fines that they can't afford in the first place. If you cross that line of ignoring a teacher's request to leave their classroom and you start grabbing other students, then violence against you is justified. Believe me when I say, if this kind of escalation happened in an American university, especially with all the horrible shootings we've had in the last few years - the swat team would be brought in immediately and the whole place would go into lockdown. Even worse, someone taking the law into their own hands. A lot of Canadians really take it for granted how lucky they are with their gun laws, because down here you think twice to get out of your car to have an argument with the guy who just cut you off.

#92 Satan's Evil Twin

Satan's Evil Twin

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,028 posts
  • Joined: 02-September 06

Posted 09 June 2012 - 08:52 AM

Actually pretty much all of Europe has free education, it's just a lot harder to get in because of it, where as here and in the States they will take anyone who has the money to pay for it, regardless of them being an A student or a D student. Because of that, when I was a TA, I used to get first year kids who wrote essays in text speak and didn't know any words consisting of more than 4 or 5 letters. The stupidity was really overwhelming. Also, when I studied in Ottawa most straight A students had scholarships. You rarely get a full ride for a Bachelors, but my Masters was completely free and I didn't have to work on the side either. Obviously no one with a C average is going to get a scholarship, but I think in that case this kind of education should start at the high school level if not earlier so people know exactly what they are getting themselves into.

So while free education is a great idea, what is moronic is storming classrooms of other students who want to sit there and learn, regardless of whether they agree with the protests or not. Maybe they do, but still feel it important to stay in class as they don't want to ruin their grades or worse end up in jail if cops start grabbing people unceremoniously. Then they or their families have to pay fines that they can't afford in the first place. If you cross that line of ignoring a teacher's request to leave their classroom and you start grabbing other students, then violence against you is justified. Believe me when I say, if this kind of escalation happened in an American university, especially with all the horrible shootings we've had in the last few years - the swat team would be brought in immediately and the whole place would go into lockdown. Even worse, someone taking the law into their own hands. A lot of Canadians really take it for granted how lucky they are with their gun laws, because down here you think twice to get out of your car to have an argument with the guy who just cut you off.


You're mixing up my post and the topic. If you notice, this thread has long since moved from discussing the students barging in and into discussing the protests in general (I figured this thread is as good as starting a new one). I agree with you that students who did this are in the wrong. I don't think they should be shot. I don't even understand such vile hatred for these people. I feel it's rather unbecoming of an intelligent person to be so blood thirsty.

And what a nice country America must be.

Posted Image


Father (Peace be upon You) Satan (Peace be upon You), I call to you (Peace be upon You) from the deepest parts of my heart, I praise your (Peace be upon You) name with every breath of my body, I worship you (Peace be upon You) with every fiber of my being. You (Peace be upon You) shown me what true strength is. You (Peace be upon You) have shown me what true love is. Out of the darkness you (Peace be upon You) came to show me the true light.


My master (Peace be upon You), my father (Peace be upon You) and my friend (Peace be upon You) what a great gift that is.


Posted Image Hail to the King (PBUH)! Posted Image


#93 Shift-4

Shift-4

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,452 posts
  • Joined: 11-August 06

Posted 09 June 2012 - 09:06 AM

You're begging the questions. The facts are that Albertan oil royalties have never reached the lows set by Premiers (and federal taxes have been cut in more than half in a decade), Alberta has been running a deficit and will continue until 2014, Albertan oil sands aren't exactly risk-free (since you're driving home the off-shore risk), and Newfoundland has 3 off-shore rigs, producing 12% of Canada's oil and capable of much more. Facts are that oil that is currently in Canada is being siphoned off by foreign companies with little benefit to Canadians, including Albertans.

You can point to any number of differences between Norway and Canada, and it won't change the above. Do you like the above? I don't.


I wasn't begging any questions :P

Alberta's deficit is covered by the Sustainability fund which sat at $11B at the end of the 10-11 fiscal year.
Royalties haven't been great as a percentage but at the rates they are at the $ come in thanks to volume. I would like to see rates higher however.

I wouldn't say oil being sold internationally is of little benefit to Albertans (or Canadians). Over 20% of AB revenue came directly from oil royalties. Then you can add to that all the income tax from persons and businesses involved in the oil industry. And because of this industry AB continues to be the leader in equalization transfers to the 'have-not' provinces of Canada.


I am not fond of the detrimental factors of the oil industry but I also do not ignore the benefits that exist.
Hockey is the only sport, the rest are just games.

#94 Guest_BuckFoston_*

Guest_BuckFoston_*
  • Guests
  • Joined: --

Posted 09 June 2012 - 09:27 AM

You're mixing up my post and the topic. If you notice, this thread has long since moved from discussing the students barging in and into discussing the protests in general (I figured this thread is as good as starting a new one). I agree with you that students who did this are in the wrong. I don't think they should be shot. I don't even understand such vile hatred for these people. I feel it's rather unbecoming of an intelligent person to be so blood thirsty.

And what a nice country America must be.


It's not something I am proud of, but when I see the real problems in my own home country (Ukraine), the injustice that the citizens are subjected to, the human rights violations going on left and right - the protests in Montreal make me that much more angry. It's like oh, I feel so bad for your 1st world problems when I know people who worked like dogs to build those Euro 2012 stadiums and have still not been paid for the month of FEBRUARY. I don't think anyone here can even imagine what that is like. We have no welfare programs, no quick loans, no one to complain to or sue. If they protest, they get hauled away in buses, some never to be heard from again.

Seriously though, I've lived in many countries over the course of my life and the best one has always been Canada. Sure, it has major problems like anyone else, but it was the only place where I always had a roof over my head, running water, food, had half decent health care, was never afraid to go out at night or to speak my mind publicly with the fear of getting beaten in some basement or having my family threatened. From this angle, it's hard not to see these protesters as anything other than spoiled schmucks.

#95 Satan's Evil Twin

Satan's Evil Twin

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,028 posts
  • Joined: 02-September 06

Posted 09 June 2012 - 09:28 AM

I wasn't begging any questions :P

Alberta's deficit is covered by the Sustainability fund which sat at $11B at the end of the 10-11 fiscal year.
Royalties haven't been great as a percentage but at the rates they are at the $ come in thanks to volume. I would like to see rates higher however.

I wouldn't say oil being sold internationally is of little benefit to Albertans (or Canadians). Over 20% of AB revenue came directly from oil royalties. Then you can add to that all the income tax from persons and businesses involved in the oil industry. And because of this industry AB continues to be the leader in equalization transfers to the 'have-not' provinces of Canada.


I am not fond of the detrimental factors of the oil industry but I also do not ignore the benefits that exist.


We seem to agree, so I don't understand why you're trying to make excuses for the way Canadian resources are developed.

And nobody is arguing against development here, so any benefits from workers are moot. The detrimental factors I'm talking about are financial.

Posted Image


Father (Peace be upon You) Satan (Peace be upon You), I call to you (Peace be upon You) from the deepest parts of my heart, I praise your (Peace be upon You) name with every breath of my body, I worship you (Peace be upon You) with every fiber of my being. You (Peace be upon You) shown me what true strength is. You (Peace be upon You) have shown me what true love is. Out of the darkness you (Peace be upon You) came to show me the true light.


My master (Peace be upon You), my father (Peace be upon You) and my friend (Peace be upon You) what a great gift that is.


Posted Image Hail to the King (PBUH)! Posted Image


#96 Satan's Evil Twin

Satan's Evil Twin

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,028 posts
  • Joined: 02-September 06

Posted 09 June 2012 - 09:32 AM

It's not something I am proud of, but when I see the real problems in my own home country (Ukraine), the injustice that the citizens are subjected to, the human rights violations going on left and right - the protests in Montreal make me that much more angry. It's like oh, I feel so bad for your 1st world problems when I know people who worked like dogs to build those Euro 2012 stadiums and have still not been paid for the month of FEBRUARY. I don't think anyone here can even imagine what that is like. We have no welfare programs, no quick loans, no one to complain to or sue. If they protest, they get hauled away in buses, some never to be heard from again.

Seriously though, I've lived in many countries over the course of my life and the best one has always been Canada. Sure, it has major problems like anyone else, but it was the only place where I always had a roof over my head, running water, food, had half decent health care, was never afraid to go out at night or to speak my mind publicly with the fear of getting beaten in some basement or having my family threatened. From this angle, it's hard not to see these protesters as anything other than spoiled schmucks.


Comrade, ya sam s Har'kova. You don't have to tell me about Ukraine.

You're saying that because things are so bad in Ukraine, people don't have the right to protest where things are better? Things could be even better for Canadians, but we should watch others enjoy good things because Ukrainians have it bad? Maybe Uks should shut up because compared so Somalia and Afghanistan, things aren't so bad. You have an emotional opinion not grounded in facts, and you want to shoot people for interfering with your daily activities? Excuse my skepticism toward your masters degree. :sadno:

Posted Image


Father (Peace be upon You) Satan (Peace be upon You), I call to you (Peace be upon You) from the deepest parts of my heart, I praise your (Peace be upon You) name with every breath of my body, I worship you (Peace be upon You) with every fiber of my being. You (Peace be upon You) shown me what true strength is. You (Peace be upon You) have shown me what true love is. Out of the darkness you (Peace be upon You) came to show me the true light.


My master (Peace be upon You), my father (Peace be upon You) and my friend (Peace be upon You) what a great gift that is.


Posted Image Hail to the King (PBUH)! Posted Image


#97 Shift-4

Shift-4

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,452 posts
  • Joined: 11-August 06

Posted 09 June 2012 - 09:45 AM

We seem to agree, so I don't understand why you're trying to make excuses for the way Canadian resources are developed.

And nobody is arguing against development here, so any benefits from workers are moot. The detrimental factors I'm talking about are financial.


Was I making excuses?

Basically I just don't like hearing we should be like _________. Other countries are not Canada. I could list hundreds of ways we are different and how you can't apply what happens elsewhere to Canada.
Hockey is the only sport, the rest are just games.

#98 Satan's Evil Twin

Satan's Evil Twin

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,028 posts
  • Joined: 02-September 06

Posted 09 June 2012 - 09:57 AM

Was I making excuses?

Basically I just don't like hearing we should be like _________. Other countries are not Canada. I could list hundreds of ways we are different and how you can't apply what happens elsewhere to Canada.


And I could list hundreds of ways we are similar and how you can apply what happens elsewhere to Canada. Are you just arguing to argue? Because that's what I do. I was making a valid comparison between high financial benefit to Norway and low financial benefit to Canada (Alberta, really) from the same resource (albeit differently extracted). it's not even to say we should be just like Norway, it just demonstrates that Alberta could do better, something you and I agree on.

Edited by Scorpio Ego, 09 June 2012 - 09:58 AM.

Posted Image


Father (Peace be upon You) Satan (Peace be upon You), I call to you (Peace be upon You) from the deepest parts of my heart, I praise your (Peace be upon You) name with every breath of my body, I worship you (Peace be upon You) with every fiber of my being. You (Peace be upon You) shown me what true strength is. You (Peace be upon You) have shown me what true love is. Out of the darkness you (Peace be upon You) came to show me the true light.


My master (Peace be upon You), my father (Peace be upon You) and my friend (Peace be upon You) what a great gift that is.


Posted Image Hail to the King (PBUH)! Posted Image


#99 Shift-4

Shift-4

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,452 posts
  • Joined: 11-August 06

Posted 09 June 2012 - 09:59 AM

Are you just arguing to argue? Because that's what I do.


:lol:

Something else we can agree on :P
Hockey is the only sport, the rest are just games.

#100 Guest_BuckFoston_*

Guest_BuckFoston_*
  • Guests
  • Joined: --

Posted 09 June 2012 - 10:19 AM

Comrade, ya sam s Har'kova. You don't have to tell me about Ukraine.

You're saying that because things are so bad in Ukraine, people don't have the right to protest where things are better? Things could be even better for Canadians, but we should watch others enjoy good things because Ukrainians have it bad? Maybe Uks should shut up because compared so Somalia and Afghanistan, things aren't so bad. You have an emotional opinion not grounded in facts, and you want to shoot people for interfering with your daily activities? Excuse my skepticism toward your masters degree. :sadno:


Ey now, I never said I wanted to shoot people, but if some else resorted to that that doesn't mean I would sit here crying. When people start attacking you and/or defacing your property they are perpetrating violence. To turn the other cheek would be foolish. Therefore, there should be no surprise if violence is answered with violence. That is all I was trying to say on that matter.

Also, not believing entirely in peace and a violence free way of life does not make me any less intelligent, but thanks for the jab. Do you think Malcom X was an idiot in comparison to MLK? Both have earned their place in history and have loyal followers. An eye for an eye makes the world blind is a nice concept to aspire to, but it's entirely unrealistic, comrade.

#101 Satan's Evil Twin

Satan's Evil Twin

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,028 posts
  • Joined: 02-September 06

Posted 09 June 2012 - 10:30 AM

Ey now, I never said I wanted to shoot people, but if some else resorted to that that doesn't mean I would sit here crying. When people start attacking you and/or defacing your property they are perpetrating violence. To turn the other cheek would be foolish. Therefore, there should be no surprise if violence is answered with violence. That is all I was trying to say on that matter.

Also, not believing entirely in peace and a violence free way of life does not make me any less intelligent, but thanks for the jab. Do you think Malcom X was an idiot in comparison to MLK? Both have earned their place in history and have loyal followers. An eye for an eye makes the world blind is a nice concept to aspire to, but it's entirely unrealistic, comrade.


Uh...


If I were sitting in a class, or god forbid teaching one of my student discussion groups and these morons stormed my room and jumped on my tables I'd get off my chair and take it to their god damn knee caps. I doubt anyone would be arresting me for assault either, but if they did - fine with me. And that's in nice ol' Canada of course. Come down and try that kind of nonsense here in the States and you will get shot, deservingly so.


Sorry man, I don't put words in people's mouths.

It wasn't a jab, it was sincere skepticism. The conversation had nothing to do with turning the other cheek, nor have I suggested that's what should be done. And I stated the students are in the wrong. Forgive me if I'm wrong, but isn't one of the reasons for leaving Ukraine is to live in a society where every punishment doesn't involve violence and death? Charge them with assault and move on. No need to get your panties in a knot and yell for "someone" to shoot them.

Edited by Scorpio Ego, 09 June 2012 - 10:31 AM.

Posted Image


Father (Peace be upon You) Satan (Peace be upon You), I call to you (Peace be upon You) from the deepest parts of my heart, I praise your (Peace be upon You) name with every breath of my body, I worship you (Peace be upon You) with every fiber of my being. You (Peace be upon You) shown me what true strength is. You (Peace be upon You) have shown me what true love is. Out of the darkness you (Peace be upon You) came to show me the true light.


My master (Peace be upon You), my father (Peace be upon You) and my friend (Peace be upon You) what a great gift that is.


Posted Image Hail to the King (PBUH)! Posted Image


#102 Satan's Evil Twin

Satan's Evil Twin

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,028 posts
  • Joined: 02-September 06

Posted 13 June 2012 - 11:09 AM

Northern Light
Posted on Jun 3, 2012
Posted Image
By Chris Hedges
I gave a talk last week at Canada’s Wilfrid Laurier University to theCongress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. Many in the audience had pinned small red squares of felt to their clothing. Thecarre rouge, or red square, has become the Canadian symbol of revolt. It comes from the French phrase carrement dans le rouge, or “squarely in the red,” referring to those crushed by debt.
The streets of Montreal are clogged nightly with as many as 100,000 protesters banging pots and pans and demanding that the old systems of power be replaced. The mass student strike in Quebec, the longest and largest student protest in Canadian history, began over the announcement of tuition hikes and has metamorphosed into what must swiftly build in the United States—a broad popular uprising. The debt obligation of Canadian university students, even with Quebec’s proposed 82 percent tuition hike over several years, is dwarfed by the huge university fees and the $1 trillion of debt faced by U.S. college students. The Canadian students have gathered widespread support because they linked their tuition protests to Quebec’s call for higher fees for health care, the firing of public sector employees, the closure of factories, the corporate exploitation of natural resources, new restrictions on union organizing, and an announced increase in the retirement age. Crowds in Montreal, now counting 110 days of protests, chant “On ne lâche pas”—“We’re not backing down.”
The Quebec government, which like the United States’ security and surveillance state is deaf to the pleas for justice and fearful of widespread unrest, has reacted by trying to stamp out the rebellion. It has arrested hundreds of protesters. The government passed Law 78, which makes demonstrations inside or near a college or university campus illegal and outlaws spontaneous demonstrations in the province. It forces those who protest to seek permission from the police and imposes fines of up to $125,000 for organizations that defy the new regulations. This, as with the international Occupy movement, has become a test of wills between a disaffected citizenry and the corporate state. The fight in Quebec is our fight. Their enemy is our enemy. And their victory is our victory.
This sustained resistance is far more effective than a May Day strike. If Canadians can continue to boycott university classrooms, continue to get crowds into the streets and continue to keep the mainstream behind the movement, the government will become weak and isolated. It is worth attempting in the United States. College graduates in Canada, the U.S., Spain, Greece, Ireland and Egypt, among other countries, cannot find jobs commensurate with their education. They are crippled by debt. Solidarity means joining forces with all those who are fighting to destroy global, corporate capitalism. It is the same struggle. A blow outside our borders weakens the corporate foe at home. And a boycott of our own would empower the boycott across the border.
The din of citizens beating pots and pans reverberates nightly in cities in Quebec. The protesters are part of what has been nicknamed the army of the cacerolazo, or the casseroles. I heard the same clanging of pots and pans when I covered the protests against Manuel Noriega in Panama and the street protests against Augusto Pinochet in Chile. Quebec Premier Jean Charest, who despite Law 78 has been unable to thwart the street demonstrations, is the latest victim. I hope the next is Barack Obama or Mitt Romney; they, and Charest, are puppets manipulated by corporate power.

The importance of the Occupy movement, and the reason I suspect its encampments were so brutally dismantled by the Obama administration, is that the corporate state understood and feared its potential to spark a popular rebellion. I do not think the state has won. All the injustices and grievances that drove people into the Occupy encampments and onto the streets have been ignored by the state and are getting worse. And we will see eruptions of discontent in the weeks and months ahead.

If these mass protests fail, opposition will inevitably take a frightening turn. The longer we endure political paralysis, the longer the formal mechanisms of power fail to respond, the more the extremists on the left and the right—those who venerate violence and are intolerant of ideological deviations—will be empowered. Under the steady breakdown of globalization, the political environment has become a mound of tinder waiting for a light.
The Golden Dawn party in Greece uses the Nazi salute, has as its symbol a variation of the Nazi swastika and has proposed setting up internment camps for foreigners who refuse to leave the country. It took 21 seats, or 7 percent of the vote, in the May parliamentary elections. France’s far-right National Front, led by Marine Le Pen, pulled 18 percent of the vote in the first round of the presidential election. The right-wing Freedom Party in the Netherlands is the third largest in the parliament and brought down the minority government. The Freedom Party in Austria is now the second most popular in the country and holds 34 seats in the 183-seat lower house of the parliament. The Progress Party in Norway is the largest element of the opposition. The Danish People’s Party is Denmark’s third largest. And the Hungarian fascist party Jobbik, or the Movement for a Better Hungary, captured 17 percent of the vote in the last election. Jobbik is allied with uniformed thugs known as the Hungarian Guard, which has set up patrols in the impoverished countryside to “protect” Hungarians from Gypsies. And that intolerance is almost matched by Israel’s ruling Kadima party, which spews ethnic chauvinism and racism toward Arabs and has mounted a campaign against dissenters within the Jewish state.


The left in times of turmoil always coughs up its own version of the goons on the far right. Black Bloc anarchists within the Occupy movement in the United States, although they remain marginal, replicate the hyper-masculinity, lust for violence and quest for ideological purity of the right while using the language of the left. And they, or a similar configuration, will grow if the center disintegrates.
These radical groups, right and left, give to their followers a sense of comradeship and empowerment that alleviates the insecurity, helplessness and alienation that plague the disenfranchised. Adherents surrender the anxiety of moral choice for the euphoria of collective emotions. The individual’s conscience, a word that evolved from the Latincon (with) and scientia (knowledge), is nullified by personal sublimation into the collective of the crowd. Knowledge is banished for emotion. I saw this in Yugoslavia. And this is what happened in Germany during the Weimar Republic. The Nazis, who knew whom they could trust, forbade recruitment from the Social Democrats. They understood that the bourgeoisie liberals of that political stripe lacked the desired ideological rigidity. But the Nazis embraced recruits who defected from the Communist Party. Communists easily grasped the simplistic, binary view of the world that split human relations into us and them, the good and the evil, the friend and the enemy. They made good comrades.
“Comradeship always sets the cultural tone at the lowest possible level, accessible to everyone,” Sebastian Haffner wrote in his book “Defying Hitler,” which more and more looks like a primer on the disintegration of the early 21st century. “It cannot tolerate discussion; in the chemical solution of comradeship, discussion immediately takes on the color of whining and grumbling. It becomes a mortal sin. Comradeship admits no thoughts, just mass feelings of the most primitive sort—these, on the other hand, are inescapable; to try and evade them is to put oneself beyond the pale.”
William Butler Yeats, although he saw his salvation in fascism, understood the deadly process of disintegration:


Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.


Those of us who care about a civil society, and who abhor violence, should begin to replicate what is happening in Quebec. There is not much time left. The volcano is about to erupt. I know what it looks and feels like. Yet there is a maddening futility in naming what is happening. The noise and cant of the crowd, the seduction of ideologies of hate and violence, the blindness of those who foolishly continue to place their faith in a dead political process, the sea of propaganda that confuses and entertains, the apathy of the good and the industry and dedication of the bad, conspire to drown out reason and civility. Instinct replaces thought. Toughness replaces empathy. “Authenticity” replaces rationality. And the dictates of individual conscience are surrendered to the herd.
There still is time to act. There still are mass movements to join. If the street protests in Quebec, the most important resistance movement in the industrialized world, spread to all of Canada and reach the United States, there remains the possibility of hope.
http://www.truthdig....light_20120603/

Edited by Scorpio Ego, 13 June 2012 - 11:15 AM.

Posted Image


Father (Peace be upon You) Satan (Peace be upon You), I call to you (Peace be upon You) from the deepest parts of my heart, I praise your (Peace be upon You) name with every breath of my body, I worship you (Peace be upon You) with every fiber of my being. You (Peace be upon You) shown me what true strength is. You (Peace be upon You) have shown me what true love is. Out of the darkness you (Peace be upon You) came to show me the true light.


My master (Peace be upon You), my father (Peace be upon You) and my friend (Peace be upon You) what a great gift that is.


Posted Image Hail to the King (PBUH)! Posted Image


#103 Buggernut

Buggernut

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,526 posts
  • Joined: 15-March 03

Posted 13 June 2012 - 12:01 PM

lol look @ the over weight youngsters, man they look like they are 40 not 20 something.. good grief, the sad state of affairs we call youth. They are so oppressed by the govrenment teet they suck on.


Those people in the photo are "overweight" to you?

Damn! Don't we miss the Kate Mosses (aka Cocaine Kate) from the days of our youth?

#104 Common sense

Common sense

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,704 posts
  • Joined: 08-January 06

Posted 12 July 2012 - 03:47 PM

Looks like the Spaniards and Greeks of Canada are taking their message west.




Quebec student leader takes protest on road as CFS looks to create ‘democratic strike movement’ in Ontario

Quebec student protest leader Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, known for his telegenic looks and refusal to condemn violence, has been recruited to teach Ontario student leaders about Quebec’s paralyzing student strikes, as Ontario students appear to be setting the stage for their own season of discontent.

The Canadian Federation of Students has organized and funded Mr. Nadeau-Dubois and other Quebec organizers to tour 10 Ontario universities for its Quebec-Ontario Student Solidarity Tour.

“We are optimistic that a general student strike in Ontario can and will succeed, given the right ingredients,” an open letter from Quebec activists to the CFS said, adding the letter “represents a first step towards creating a radical, democratic strike movement in Ontario and beyond.”

The nine-day tour will kick off Thursday at the University of Ottawa, and Mr. Nadeau-Dubois said Tuesday his group, CLASSE, is considering a September tour to other provinces.

“They contacted us a few weeks ago to say that there were a lot of students organizations in Ontario who were interested in receiving us,” according to Mr. Nadeau-Dubois. “It’s really an opportunity to share what we have learned in the last months; to share our knowledge of mobilization, of social organization.”

Asked if the CFS wishes to see the same paralyzing strikes here in Ontario, spokesperson Sarah King said the CFS is a member driven organization and does not currently have a mandate to support a strike. All decisions regarding policy and campaigns are made at bi-annual general meetings. The meetings typically host 120 of Ontario’s nearly 400,000 students.

The University of Toronto will also host a separate Student Strike Training Program this month. The workshops include “creating and/or radicalizing student associations,” and methods of “enforcing strikes.”

“For me, the main point is just sort of, let’s help people not make the same mistakes we made and replicate the successes,” Quebec student and event organizer Jamie Burnett said.

The event has also received a shower of support from unions, including the Ontario Union of Postal Workers local 538 and the Public Service Alliance of Canada.

“Our union recognizes that the fight to keep tuition affordable is linked to the fight for decent wages and working conditions,” the Postal Workers wrote in a statement. The union has donated money for the CFS event, but a union spokesperson was unable to confirm the amount.

Rodney Diverlus, president of Ryerson University’s graduate association, said its own CLASSE event is being funded, in part, by the student association.

“You need to show solidarity with Quebec and the work they’re doing and student power across the country but it’s making sure we’re still having the conversation in our province with students on our own particular campuses to talk about our issues too,” Mr. Diverlus said.

The CFS is best known for its annual Education is a Right and Drop Fees campaigns, which lobby the provincial and federal governments to lower tution fees.

“Our tuition fees are the highest in Canada and have gone up since 2006 by 71%,” CFS spokesperson Sarah King said. “Ontario students definitely have a lot to work on and definitely should be inspired to do so.”

Not all students, however, are happy about the program. Alexandre Meterissian, a student journalist and outspoken opponent of the student strikes, said the student groups are “playing politics” with students’ money.

“I would not advocate to stop the workshops,” he said. “I just don’t want my money to pay for it in any way or if I was a university of Toronto I wouldn’t want my money in any of these workshops.”

Mr. Meterissian said students’ time would be better spent by getting involved in politics.

“There’s other ways to influence policy than going into the streets. Getting involved politically would have a much better return on their investment in terms of money than organizing these gigantic rallies that cost thousands of dollars to organize.”

Mr. Meterissian has been the voice of what he calls Quebec’s “silent majority.” Despite calls for solidarity, roughly two-thirds of Quebec students, primarily from McGill, remained in school and finished writing their final exams.

Quebec students took to the streets in February to protest a proposed increase in tuition fees of $1,625 over five years. The daily marches included violence from masked Black Bloc activists, and soon developed into a movement calling for free education across Canada. Quebec students currently pay about half of what other Canadian students pay.

In Ontario, the McGuinty government introduced a 30% tuition rebate for students last fall but, according to Mr. Burnett, the funds are not reaching enough students due to the program’s strict qualifications. In addition, Ontario students said the government hiked tuition rates shortly after the rebate took effect.

http://news.national...trike-movement/




Canucks.com is the official Web site of The Vancouver Canucks. The Vancouver Canucks and Canucks.com are trademarks of The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership.  NHL and the word mark and image of the Stanley Cup are registered trademarks and the NHL Shield and NHL Conference logos are trademarks of the National Hockey League. All NHL logos and marks and NHL team logos and marks as well as all other proprietary materials depicted herein are the property of the NHL and the respective NHL teams and may not be reproduced without the prior written consent of NHL Enterprises, L.P.  Copyright © 2009 The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership and the National Hockey League.  All Rights Reserved.