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The Situation

Luongo, Schneider Together Forever? [Province Article]

Goaltending Situation   244 members have voted

  1. 1. What would you prefer happen?

    • Schneider as starter and Luongo traded
    • Luongo as starter and Schneider traded
    • Schneider and Luongo split 41 games each

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94 posts in this topic

Well, its a possibility that I wouldn't mind but only if Schneider is signed to a long term deal which is unlikely.

Canucks: Luongo, Schneider together forever?

‘Distinct possibility’ both goaltenders could return next year, says Gillis

During a turn-back-the-clock, sunset run for Martin Brodeur, which began at the all-star break, the evidence has been mounting the 40-year-old is not ready to retire.

When there was a mention during Saturday’s CBC broadcast of Brodeur’s brother believing the goalie is coming back, it was yet another sign this won’t be the end of his career.

Great news for anyone who has enjoyed watching Brodeur get to the Eastern Conference final. Not so much, however, for the Vancouver Canucks, because it means the already knee-high Roberto Luongo trade pool gets even shallower.

Maybe that’s why GM Mike Gillis, in an interview on Hockey Night in Canada radio this week, said bringing back both goalies, Luongo and Cory Schneider, for another season is a “distinct possibility.”

It could be posturing. Even if the Canucks felt they needed to trade Luongo, the team wouldn’t want to be desperate or be perceived that way. But don’t be so quick to dismiss it. Gillis wasn’t the only one this week hinting the Canucks goalie controversy, like Brodeur, may get another go around.

“Having both goalies back in Vancouver next year is definitely a possibility and probably the leading possibility,” Mike Liut, Cory Schnieder’s agent, told The Province.

“Cory will approach the season as he did this year — you focus on what you can control.”

It’s hard to imagine how having both back would be a healthy situation for either goalie, or the Canucks, who risk having too many resources and cap space tied up in one position where only one player can start at a time. There comes a time when a team is best served by making a decision and moving on. We’re there with the Canucks’ goalies. Sure, it’s worked for past couple of years, and worked exceptionally well, but the dynamics have changed.

At 26, Schneider, understandably, wants significantly more playing time, and battling Luongo for shifts in the crease isn’t the easiest, or smoothest way to go about getting that done. If you thought the goalie storyline was consuming and ubiquitous last season, that’s like an amuse-bouche compared to the meal people will be making of it this fall.

That’s partly why Luongo told the Canucks at the end of the season he’d be willing to waive his no-trade clause, if it’s what is best for everyone.

If the Canucks don’t trade him can’t trade him they risk losing Schneider, who could, potentially, sign an offer sheet as a restricted free agent after July 1. The Canucks can choose to take him to arbitration but not until July 5, leaving four days where other teams will be able to negotiate with one of the most coveted goalies in hockey.

Then, of course, there’s July 1, 2013 when Schneider can become an unrestricted free agent.

Losing Schneider would be like pouring a dump truck of concrete into the luggage Luongo is already hauling around Vancouver and Rogers Arena. With negativity toward him always percolating with the fanbase, he’d suddenly be the guy who cost the organization the young stud goalie. Just picture how it would go if Schneider were ever to make a long playoff run in another uniform.

Those risks can’t be too palatable for the Canucks, who want to keep Schneider for the long haul. And why wouldn’t they? He’s seven years younger than Luongo, and outplayed him down the stretch and in the playoffs this year. He also has a personality which may work well in Vancouver, where the most popular goalie is often the backup.

“He has the demeanor to play goal — calm, athletic. competitive and he doesn’t look for an out when things go sideways,” Liut said. “He blends in with the guys. It’s hard for a goalie — they’re different, don’t you know, which is why his teammates like him and play for him.”

Luongo’s postseason production is still constantly called into question. And in his past four playoffs, Luongo’s numbers aren’t exactly sparkling. His save percentages have been .914, .895, .914 and .891. Each year he’s dropped off from his regular season performance and suffered from wild swings in play. He’s had great highs, but fall-off-a-cliff lows.

It’s unfair to compare Luongo to the four goalies still playing, especially considering their backstopping more defensive teams. But they’ve all played better than they did in the regular season. Jonathan Quick has a .951 save percentage. Henrik Lundqvist and Mike Smith are both at .942. And Martin Brodeur is the low guy at .920.

But if the Canucks discover there’s only tepid interest in Luongo, it’s not because of his postseason numbers. It’s the fact his contract has him signed until 2022. With the current collective bargaining agreement (CBA) expiring in September, there will be potential suitors left wanting to wait to see what the new rules are before committing to pay out all that money.

For example, Luongo doesn’t have a no-movement clause, and one of the advantages of his contract was that you could “bury” it in the minors during the final years, if he doesn’t retire. But there is a movement being pushed which won’t allow teams to bury contracts under the new CBA.

While exchanging emails with Liut, who was in Helsinki this week for the world championships, the agent was asked if he would consider a multi-year deal for Schneider if Luongo is still a Canuck.

“Roberto has been very good to Cory, he is a veteran secure in his ability and has helped Cory learn what it takes to play goal in the NHL. Beyond that, of course Cory wants to play more and that can’t happen with, as you say, two great goalies in Vancouver,” Liut said.

For now, Liut said “when, where and how it happens - that Cory plays more - for the most part - is out of his hands.”

© Copyright © The Province

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It really depends on what the returns are....

I would gladly move Schneider for the right package if Luongo doesnt command a significant return.

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It's funny how before Luongo came, most Canuck goalies sucked with the exception of a few but now we got two of the best goalies of the NHL and we consider this a problem. It removes preasure off both of their backs and if one of them is doing bad the other one can come in.

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Answer is NO. Lu needs to go, Schneider is ready and we will win the cup with him. MG will lose his job if he can't trade LU and ends up losing Schneider for nothing. Seriously if LU did not play the first 2 games against LA we would have had a better chance of beating LA.

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I hope this is true, I hope we change absolutely nothing and try for a better result. We have won 2 presidents trophies and they are worth 5x as much as a Stanley cup...

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I hope this is true, I hope we change absolutely nothing and try for a better result. We have won 2 presidents trophies and they are worth 5x as much as a Stanley cup...

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Luongo isn't worth the $5.3 mil he costs now, when he's playing 60 games per season. He sure as heck isn't going to be worth it playing backup to Schneider next year. There is only one choice to make here. Schneider is younger, better, cheaper so he stays. Luongo's contract gets shipped out of town and the cap space it frees up is used to give Schneider a decent contract, and sign somebody else to address one of the other problems on this team.

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Cory stated he wants to be a starter.

Gillis has the 'distinct' part right,anyways.

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One thing is for certain. Lu, Cory, their agents and the Canucks are doing their best to make the best of a difficult situation.

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I believe Gillis saying that bringing back both goalies is a distinct possibility is the same as Yzerman saying he is really interested in Bernier.

It's called gamesmanship. Yzerman tries to drive the price down through the media, Gillis takes a "I don't care. I'll keep them both" position.

regards,

G.

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I personally would love to keep them both and make them split 41 games. They work well together and Schneider feeds off Luongo's knowledge as he will only get better and better. Unfortunately due to the salary cap it is unlikely but it has proved its success.

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Answer is NO. Lu needs to go, Schneider is ready and we will win the cup with him. MG will lose his job if he can't trade LU and ends up losing Schneider for nothing. Seriously if LU did not play the first 2 games against LA we would have had a better chance of beating LA.

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We need to sign Schneider, the sooner the better.

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I had no idea Rick Astley sang this song.

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