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samirjaver

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Schneider's Agent: Both Goalies Coming Back Is "leading Possibility"

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http://www.theprovin...l#ixzz1vNJcilr6

During a turn-back-the-clock, sunset run for Martin Brodeur, which began at the all-star break, the evidence has been mounting the 40-year-old is not ready to retire.

When there was a mention during Saturday’s CBC broadcast of Brodeur’s brother believing the goalie is coming back, it was yet another sign this won’t be the end of his career.

Great news for anyone who has enjoyed watching Brodeur get to the Eastern Conference final. Not so much, however, for the Vancouver Canucks, because it means the already knee-high Roberto Luongo trade pool gets even shallower.

Maybe that’s why GM Mike Gillis, in an interview on Hockey Night in Canada radio this week, said bringing back both goalies, Luongo and Cory Schneider, for another season is a “distinct possibility.”

It could be posturing. Even if the Canucks felt they needed to trade Luongo, the team wouldn’t want to be desperate or be perceived that way. But don’t be so quick to dismiss it. Gillis wasn’t the only one this week hinting the Canucks goalie controversy, like Brodeur, may get another go around.

“Having both goalies back in Vancouver next year is definitely a possibility and probably the leading possibility,” Mike Liut, Cory Schnieder’s agent, told The Province.

“Cory will approach the season as he did this year — you focus on what you can control.”

It’s hard to imagine how having both back would be a healthy situation for either goalie, or the Canucks, who risk having too many resources and cap space tied up in one position where only one player can start at a time. There comes a time when a team is best served by making a decision and moving on. We’re there with the Canucks’ goalies. Sure, it’s worked for past couple of years, and worked exceptionally well, but the dynamics have changed.

At 26, Schneider, understandably, wants significantly more playing time, and battling Luongo for shifts in the crease isn’t the easiest, or smoothest way to go about getting that done. If you thought the goalie storyline was consuming and ubiquitous last season, that’s like an amuse-bouche compared to the meal people will be making of it this fall.

That’s partly why Luongo told the Canucks at the end of the season he’d be willing to waive his no-trade clause, if it’s what is best for everyone.

If the Canucks don’t trade him can’t trade him they risk losing Schneider, who could, potentially, sign an offer sheet as a restricted free agent after July 1. The Canucks can choose to take him to arbitration but not until July 5, leaving four days where other teams will be able to negotiate with one of the most coveted goalies in hockey.

Then, of course, there’s July 1, 2013 when Schneider can become an unrestricted free agent.

Losing Schneider would be like pouring a dump truck of concrete into the luggage Luongo is already hauling around Vancouver and Rogers Arena. With negativity toward him always percolating with the fanbase, he’d suddenly be the guy who cost the organization the young stud goalie. Just picture how it would go if Schneider were ever to make a long playoff run in another uniform.

Those risks can’t be too palatable for the Canucks, who want to keep Schneider for the long haul. And why wouldn’t they? He’s seven years younger than Luongo, and outplayed him down the stretch and in the playoffs this year. He also has a personality which may work well in Vancouver, where the most popular goalie is often the backup.

“He has the demeanor to play goal — calm, athletic. competitive and he doesn’t look for an out when things go sideways,” Liut said. “He blends in with the guys. It’s hard for a goalie — they’re different, don’t you know, which is why his teammates like him and play for him.”

Luongo’s postseason production is still constantly called into question. And in his past four playoffs, Luongo’s numbers aren’t exactly sparkling. His save percentages have been .914, .895, .914 and .891. Each year he’s dropped off from his regular season performance and suffered from wild swings in play. He’s had great highs, but fall-off-a-cliff lows.

It’s unfair to compare Luongo to the four goalies still playing, especially considering their backstopping more defensive teams. But they’ve all played better than they did in the regular season. Jonathan Quick has a .951 save percentage. Henrik Lundqvist and Mike Smith are both at .942. And Martin Brodeur is the low guy at .920.

But if the Canucks discover there’s only tepid interest in Luongo, it’s not because of his postseason numbers. It’s the fact his contract has him signed until 2022. With the current collective bargaining agreement (CBA) expiring in September, there will be potential suitors left wanting to wait to see what the new rules are before committing to pay out all that money.

For example, Luongo doesn’t have a no-movement clause, and one of the advantages of his contract was that you could “bury” it in the minors during the final years, if he doesn’t retire. But there is a movement being pushed which won’t allow teams to bury contracts under the new CBA.

While exchanging emails with Liut, who was in Helsinki this week for the world championships, the agent was asked if he would consider a multi-year deal for Schneider if Luongo is still a Canuck.

“Roberto has been very good to Cory, he is a veteran secure in his ability and has helped Cory learn what it takes to play goal in the NHL. Beyond that, of course Cory wants to play more and that can’t happen with, as you say, two great goalies in Vancouver,” Liut said.

For now, Liut said “when, where and how it happens - that Cory plays more - for the most part - is out of his hands.”

Read more: http://www.theprovin...l#ixzz1vNXTsttY

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I think that if the organization would have to let one of them go now or after next year at most. So might as well let go now and move on. Schneider will get a new contract with a much bigger cap hit.

If we keep both we'll have to let one go next year with Edler and Burrows getting new contracts with higher salaries

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If one of them is not dealt it will have a strong chance that it becomes a distraction as soon as one of them does not have a good game

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This team isn't strong enough to keep both goalies. We need to turn one of those goalies into an offensive player.

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Absolutely brutal. Why should we keep both goalies? It's senseless. It's either we trade Lu or we trade Schneids. Yes, they're both amazing people and outstanding goalies, but it's a business. We need an asset to go back to the big show, and to get that, we need to trade one of our goalies. Luongo would be preferable, as we end up with more cap, leading us to a chance at going big on FA.

And why are there possibilities being rumoured already? The NHL season hasn't even ended yet, I think this is all just something to discuss... People are already getting antsy through this offseason.

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Not sure if it's a good idea or not. I think right now is the best time to trade Cory or Luu.

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in no way does this make sense for anyone....if we do keep both that would mean we would have atleast 8m spent in goalies and one of them is gonna be wearing a hat on the bench half the time

im gonna believe it when i see it because luongo wants out....so maybe the agent is just trying to put some water on the fire

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Something tells me that this is gonna be a bad idea....

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Without looking I knew Samjam posted this topic.

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Schneider needs to play more to continue his development. He needs at least 45-50 games this year.

But Lu will want to play 50 plus games.

Doesn't work out.

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As long as Luongo takes a back seat, and the cap goes up i'm fine with this.

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I think it's more mind games to keep values high.

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Maybe just saying this for leverage so we don't seem desperate in having to trade one or the other and show weakness. We need to get the maximum return for either one. If teams aren't offering that than we will keep both untill some team is really desperate for a goalie.

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in no way does this make sense for anyone....if we do keep both that would mean we would have atleast 8m spent in goalies and one of them is gonna be wearing a hat on the bench half the time

im gonna believe it when i see it because luongo wants out....so maybe the agent is just trying to put some water on the fire

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The way i interpret Gillis saying that 'keeping both is a distinct possibility' is part of the game. Why would he say we have to trade one of our goalies. That puts us at a disadvantage in negotiations. If MG publicly states he is willing keep both, then it forces other GMs to offer more.

Food for thought: Does Luongo's agent feel the same?

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The way i interpret Gillis saying that 'keeping both is a distinct possibility' is part of the game. Why would he say we have to trade one of our goalies. That puts us at a disadvantage in negotiations. If MG publicly states he is willing keep both, then it forces other GMs to offer more.

Food for thought: Does Luongo's agent feel the same?

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