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Who Am I?


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#1561 SeaBass

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 05:55 PM

Since I missed my turn yesterday, I'll do one now:

I am a retired NHLer who played for 10 seasons

I was undrafted

I won two Stanley Cups

I played for three NHL teams

I can say with 99% certainty that no other NHL player has ever had the same first name as me

Pretty vague....

#1562 RUPERTKBD

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 10:09 AM

Pretty vague....


My linemates (for most of my career) went by the nicknames "The Hammer" and "Big Bird"....
Orland Kurtenbach and Dennis Kearns had just been torched 8-1 by the Habs, but they still took time to come out to meet us, some fellow BC boys who were playing hockey in Montreal. THAT"S what being a Canuck is!

#1563 smith80

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 11:30 AM

My linemates (for most of my career) went by the nicknames "The Hammer" and "Big Bird"....


Orest Kindrachuk? Truthfully, I have never even heard of this guy. I only got it because of your last clue. And yes, I'm fairly certain he's the only Orest in NHL history.
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Posted ImagePosted Image

#1564 RUPERTKBD

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 12:07 PM

Orest Kindrachuk?  Truthfully, I have never even heard of this guy.  I only got it because of your last clue.   And yes, I'm fairly certain he's the only Orest in NHL history.


O.K. is okay!
Orland Kurtenbach and Dennis Kearns had just been torched 8-1 by the Habs, but they still took time to come out to meet us, some fellow BC boys who were playing hockey in Montreal. THAT"S what being a Canuck is!

#1565 -Vintage Canuck-

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 09:42 PM

Bump.

Anyone wanna do one?

307mg00.jpg


#1566 shawn antoski

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 12:10 PM

Who am I ???

Mike Keenan traded me
drafted by detroit
considered to be a very useful journeyman
at the start of my career i was over-rated at the end of my career i was considered under-rated
I hold 2 NHL records
i played around 1000 nhl games

#1567 RUPERTKBD

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 01:26 PM

Who am I ???

Mike Keenan traded me
drafted by detroit
considered to be a very useful journeyman
at the start of my career i was over-rated at the end of my career i was considered under-rated
I hold 2 NHL records
i played around 1000 nhl games


Adam Graves?

Edited by RUPERTKBD, 28 September 2012 - 01:27 PM.

Orland Kurtenbach and Dennis Kearns had just been torched 8-1 by the Habs, but they still took time to come out to meet us, some fellow BC boys who were playing hockey in Montreal. THAT"S what being a Canuck is!

#1568 SeaBass

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 06:25 PM

Who am I ???

Mike Keenan traded me
drafted by detroit
considered to be a very useful journeyman
at the start of my career i was over-rated at the end of my career i was considered under-rated
I hold 2 NHL records
i played around 1000 nhl games

Mike Sillinger

#1569 -Vintage Canuck-

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 03:29 PM

Are those right? ^

307mg00.jpg


#1570 shawn antoski

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 04:32 PM

Mike Sillinger


yep
http://thehockeyguys...mike-sillinger/



The name Mike Sillinger is not often used in the same breath as Wayne Gretzky or Mario Lemieux. He was not a great goal scorer like Gordie Howe or Phil Esposito and he was not a dynamic player like Bobby Orr, yet Mike Sillinger does hold two NHL records that none of these greats ever accomplished. Though they may not be legendary records, they are unique in that it will be tough to break either one. What are these NHL records? Most teams played for (12) and most times traded(9 – tied with Brent Ashton).

Sillinger did not so much have a career as he had a journey. His stops in hockey took him to both ends of the spectrum, the avid hockey markets like Vancouver, Philadelphia and Ottawa and the not so great ones like Tampa, Nashville and Anaheim. If ever a man was in need of frequent flyer miles, it was Mike Sillinger.

He made stops in an amazing twelve different cities, was property of thirteen teams and was traded more times than most players put in years played. Yet, the oddity of this is that it was not a matter of Sillinger not being wanted, it was just the opposite; everyone wanted him. He had developed into a very useful journeyman and a valuable component to any organizations playoff run.

Mike Sillingers journey began June 29, 1971 in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Growing up there wasn’t much to do in Saskatchewan to pass the time, so hockey was usually the order of business. Sillinger soaked up as much as he could like a sponge and before long he was on his way through the ranks.

His play had caught the eye of the Regina Pats of the WHL and Sillinger was more than happy to play for his hometown team, a club he grew up idolizing. His first year in Regina was nothing special, recording 43 points in 67 games, but he exploded in 1988-89 with 131 points. No one saw this coming and it certainly grabbed the attention of scouts.

That summer he was selected as the first choice, 11th overall, by the Detroit Red Wings. He would return to Regina for one season and tally 129 points, convincing Detroit to let him turn pro.

He spent the 1991-92 season in Adirondack, the AHL affiliate of the Wings, playing in only a few NHL playoff contests that season.

Sillinger would begin his career in Detroit with high expectations, but for whatever reason he never reached his potential. Though happy with his overall play and his amazing checking abilities, the Wings were disapointed in his production. A guy selected so high should be more of a force, but the reality of Mike Sillinger was that he was a very serviceable player who overachieved in junior, and Detroit were now discovering this.

In 1994-95 the Red Wings believed they needed to get tougher, and in a moment of weakness, dealt the speedy Sillinger to the Anaheim Mighty Ducks for Stu Grimson, Mark Ferner and a draft pick. The Wings sacrificed a high pick for a guy known more for his great nickname (the Grim reaper) than his hockey abilities. This would begin an unprecedented amount of traveling, something Sillinger was still too young to understand.

When a player is young they always believe they will stay in one place for a long period as it is in Junior hockey, nothing would become farther from the truth for Mike Sillinger.

In 1995-96 Sillinger was having a decent season in Anaheim, contributing as only he could, but there was still something missing in the Ducks lineup it seemed, and at the trade deadline that season, the team felt they found it in Roman Oksiuta. Sillinger was once again sent packing, this time to Vancouver for the big, but slow of foot Russian.

In Vancouver, Sillingers speed would come to the forefront and there was a lot of potential there. This was a city he very much enjoyed, and his first son was born there. The Canucks even had plans to increase his ice time the following season, then Mike Keenan would intervene.

In another of his costly moves, Keenan sent Sillinger to Philadelphia for a draft pick.

He would thrive in his short time there, recording 22 points in his first 27 games. It was the longest prolonged period of success in his NHL career thus far, but just like his address, it wouldn’t last long. The following season, 1998-99, Mike Sillinger would get off to a sluggish start, garnering only 3 assists in 25 games. He was sent to Tampa Bay with Chris Gratton for Mikael Renberg and Daymond Langkow.

As was becoming a custom with Sillinger, he was once again given an opportunity to excel and he played well for Tampa. He would see his largest point total in the NHL in 1999-2000 as he would earn 44 points in 67 games, but also that year it would mark yet another trade. This time moving to the cross state rivals the Florida Panthers for Ryan Johnson and Dwayne Hay.

It was at this time that Sillinger reflected on his career. He could do one of two things, he could get frustrated and start demanding no trade clauses or he could grin and bare it. The likable Sillinger choice the latter. He was actually beginning to find it comical that he was moving around so much, so much so that he would joke to his family every time the phone would ring that they should get packing.

Again his time in Florida would be brief and in 2000-01 he was dealt to the Ottawa Senators for cash. He was picked up solely for a playoff run, but the Senators would be eliminated from the playoffs in four games that year and it was all for naught.

That summer Sillinger uncovered new territory. He would become a free agent and for the first time in his career he was able to choose his destination. Hoping this would grant him some stability, Sillinger chose carefully. He had interest in returning to Vancouver and he also wanted to be part of another original six team (ironically for the amount of times he moved, Detroit was the only one he would ever play for) but in the end he found his best shot may be with a fairly new franchise and signed on with the Columbus Blue Jackets.

For the very first time in his career he would play 80 games all in one city. It would be only the thrid place where he would play an entire season without moving in the middle of it(Detroit and Vancouver being the others). However he wasnt quite ready to settle down and purchase a house just yet, and good thing. Not only would his next trade be a shock, but he would be traded twice in the same day.

During the summers, Sillinger and his family would often return to Regina. This was his comfort zone and he maintains a house there to this day. In the summer of 2003 he would get a call stating that he had been dealt not once, but twice. The Blue Jackets traded Sillingers rights to Dallas for Darryl Sydor. Dallas then immediately flipped him to the Phoenix Coyotes for defenseman Teppo Numminen. And just like that, two more franchises were added to his resume. In reality, all he wanted was to stay in Columbus.

By this time Sillinger expected the worst, so joining Phoenix was something he felt would not be treated with longevity. He gave it his all throughout the year, but that trade deadline would once again bring another destination. Sillinger would be traded to the St.Louis Blues.

The Blues sent goaltender Brent Johnson to Phoenix in return.

St.Louis did seem to agree with Sillinger he enjoyed playing there very much and his points totals in 20005-06 proved that, 41 in 48 games, the biggest points per game ratio thus far. The Blues so desperately wanted to hang onto the affable Sillinger but hard times meant rebuilding, something the Blues had become all to familiar with. He was traded to the Nashville Predators for prospect Timofei Sishkanov.

Sillingers speed impressed the few fans in Nashville and the team was hoping to re-sign him to a long term contract, but in only his second attempt at free agency, Sillinger was determined to look at his options. In his final and most productive location, Mike Sillinger would decide to sign with the New York Islanders.

In his first season with New York, the season of 2006-07, Sillinger would score 26 goals and put up 59 points, the most of his NHL career. His seasons on Long Island were not dazzling by any means, but he seemed to find that little extra there. Maybe his record breaking tour of the NHL was finally over.

In 2008-09 Sillinger would suffer injuries which would limit him to only 7 games. He briefly played for the Islanders farm team in Bridgeport, Connecticut for conditioning, but it was the end of the line. After 17 years and a list of cities that would read like an encyclopedia, Mike Sillinger walked away from the game, and due to injury like many things in his career, was not at his discretion.

Sillinger would have loved to play another few years, but the time had come to say goodbye, and he knew it.

How did a man with such high expectations and praise end up traveling the NHL like a tourist? Some might say he was a victim of too many rebuilding organizations. Others might say he just wasn’t good enough and that Detroit had overestimated his abilities. But a player who plays for 12 teams does not get there by having zero talents.

The reality is, he was picked up by many of those teams to help round out their rosters, and many felt Sillinger to be the final piece. In most circles that would be considered an honor, and that is exactly how Mike Sillinger took it. He was extremely proud of his accomplishments and though the focus was on his team, somewhere in between, we lost the fact that he earned 548 points and played in 1049 games, something which many players of this generation would be hard pressed to accomplish.

Today Mike Sillinger works for the Edmonton Oilers as their Director of Player Development. The Oilers are the 14th team he would be associated with in the NHL one more and he would have conquered exactly half the league. He carries on with Edmonton the way he always has, proud to have a job in the sport he loves and close enough to his home in Regina that moving isn’t a worry.

Mike Sillinger was a very unique brand of hockey player, he took things as they came and never worried about the finer details. Playing is what it was all about. He never won a Stanley Cup and sadly never even made the final round to get that opportunity, but he played nonetheless. Not bad for a kid from Regina who played hockey to pass the frigid winter days in Western Canada. The Underrated Nation, like the NHL applauds mike Sillinger and no matter where the journey takes him from here, it will be just as exciting as his 17 seasons on the ice.

Edited by shawn antoski, 29 September 2012 - 04:34 PM.


#1571 shawn antoski

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 06:31 PM

WHO AM I

played for 1 nhl team
drafted by an expansion team
shares 1 nhl record
2nd round draft pick
only lasted 2 seasons

#1572 -Vintage Canuck-

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 08:21 PM

WHO AM I

played for 1 nhl team
drafted by an expansion team
shares 1 nhl record
2nd round draft pick
only lasted 2 seasons


More hints?

307mg00.jpg


#1573 shawn antoski

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 02:05 AM

More hints?



WHO AM I

played for 1 nhl team
drafted by an expansion team
shares 1 nhl record
2nd round draft pick
only lasted 2 seasons

CANADIAN
Im a Cop now
my brother played some NHL hockey too

#1574 SN -Admin

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:35 AM

This thread has been closed due to length (greater than 50 pages) to maintain board performance. Feel free to start it again.




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