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Kamero89

Canada, and investing in our Olympic team

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The United States Olympic team is simply so successful is because they invest a massive amount of money in their athletes. Their soccer program alone gets more money than our entire Olympic program.

Own the Podium was successful in Vancouver 2010, but the total amount of investing dropped for the 2012 games. Granted the amount of total money invested is far higher than the 70's/80s/90s, where we hosted two separate Olympic games, and did not even get a gold medal.

Similar, and even worse economies invest more than us, should we step up and pay more, or put the money into other things?

The United States is est. to have spent $300m on their athletes for these games. Canada has spent a fraction of this, and it shows in the medal count.

In my opinion $300m is ridicules, especially for a country so in debt, but some more money can be found somewhere. New Zealand has half the economy of BC alone, and has 2 gold medals, and usually gets more golds than us. Spending what Germany, and Australia do seems logical. Spending smart, and to be competitive, and give our athletes an actual chance.

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No offense to our athletes, but its kind of pointless to invest in something we know we will never have a chance at, (Swimming Gold, Mens Soccer Gold)

I say invest in stuff we are close, but aren't quite their yet.

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The US doesn't think fiscally, it thinks patriotically. That's why there are people still in support of a war that cost them more than twice as much in one day than they spent on their whole Olympic program for these games.

Canada could do more for their athletes, and it is a good cause. That doesn't mean there aren't other causes too that are just as worthy, or that we don't have waste elsewhere that would help fund more deserving programs (or just outright waste), but there's only so much to do with taxpayers money.

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It is at times embarassing when we just suck period at certain events, but we shouldn't just spend a whole lot of money to be more competitive. there is a balance and if we arn't prepared to spend we better just be satisfied with ranking in the top 15 or so in medals.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but Canada has traditionally done not so well at the Summer Olympics. It's really in the winter sports where Canadians have the chance to shine.

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The only way to develop a sport is to get kids exposed at an early age.

The only way to expose kids at an early age is to have awareness and opportunities for them to develop

The only way to have development opportunities is to have support both financial and in terms of personnel

If we want to improve in these minority sports we need to make a LONG TERM committment to start young and see athletes through to the final stages of their growth.

The proof is in women's hockey - money is being given to Finland, Sweden, Switzerland, Slovakia, etc. and even though their progress is slow, it is still a vast improvement from what they were 10 years ago.

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I've always been a huge advocate for funding sports starting at the grassroots level and working up. There are so many more benefits that we get out of sports at a grassroots level that has nothing to do with success at the elite international level, but that is one.

HOWEVER more money doesn't mean more medals, and our success shouldn't be measured on medals alone. Don't forget Canada has a smaller population than most of the countries ahead of us in the medal standings (China, USA, Japan, Russia, France, UK, Italy, South Korea, Spain). You also can;t forget that most of our countries best athletes gravitate to hockey at a very early age. And if not hockey, then either other team sports or winter sports.

At the grassroots level it is easier and more beneficial to fund team sports. Hockey, soccer, baseball, basketball, football, lacrosse than it is individual sports that dominate most of the medals given out. Canada has always leaned towards team sports compared to a lot of the countries in the world.

I have no problem with the position Canada is on the international stage. Top 15 in the Summer and Top 3-5 in the Winter. Considering we are the 35th most populated country in the world that's pretty good if you ask me.

We are never going to compete with China or the USA at the olympics.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but Canada has traditionally done not so well at the Summer Olympics. It's really in the winter sports where Canadians have the chance to shine.

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I've always been a huge advocate for funding sports starting at the grassroots level and working up. There are so many more benefits that we get out of sports at a grassroots level that has nothing to do with success at the elite international level, but that is one.

HOWEVER more money doesn't mean more medals, and our success shouldn't be measured on medals alone. Don't forget Canada has a smaller population than most of the countries ahead of us in the medal standings (China, USA, Japan, Russia, France, UK, Italy, South Korea, Spain). You also can;t forget that most of our countries best athletes gravitate to hockey at a very early age. And if not hockey, then either other team sports or winter sports.

At the grassroots level it is easier and more beneficial to fund team sports. Hockey, soccer, baseball, basketball, football, lacrosse than it is individual sports that dominate most of the medals given out. Canada has always leaned towards team sports compared to a lot of the countries in the world.

I have no problem with the position Canada is on the international stage. Top 15 in the Summer and Top 3-5 in the Winter. Considering we are the 35th most populated country in the world that's pretty good if you ask me.

We are never going to compete with China or the USA at the olympics.

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Own the Podium is alive and well.

We are way ahead of pace compared to Beijing.

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Yes, but countries our size are in the top 10, we are not. We are not even projected by our own Olympic committee to do so.

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Yes, but countries our size are in the top 10, we are not. We are not even projected by our own Olympic committee to do so.

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So who exactly is comparable and how well do they do in the Winter Olympics?

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I don't think it needs to be a priority.

It clearly payed dividends with the 2010 Olympics but unless the games are on home turf Canada can't really be embarrassed unless we don't medal in Men's Hockey. Even if we spent the SAME as the USA we wouldn't nearly get the same medals as they do for obvious reasons. There will be diminishing returns on money spent for the sole purpose of trying to win medals which isn't all that important.

I think what other people said regarding the grass roots level is spot on. Spending money to give more kids more opportunities to participate, create a life long love for a sport, and doing something productive is a wise investment. It would lead to healthier, happier and more well-rounded people.

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I think a lot should be put into developing kids at an early age and throughout elementry and highschool. I have ALWAYS wanted to do track, but never really had the oppertunities in school because well, it was never big, and half the time I never heard we even had a team! Other than that, I had no idea on how to get into the sport.

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The only way to develop a sport is to get kids exposed at an early age.

The only way to expose kids at an early age is to have awareness and opportunities for them to develop

The only way to have development opportunities is to have support both financial and in terms of personnel

If we want to improve in these minority sports we need to make a LONG TERM committment to start young and see athletes through to the final stages of their growth.

The proof is in women's hockey - money is being given to Finland, Sweden, Switzerland, Slovakia, etc. and even though their progress is slow, it is still a vast improvement from what they were 10 years ago.

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The United States Olympic team is simply so successful is because they invest a massive amount of money in their athletes. Their soccer program alone gets more money than our entire Olympic program.

Own the Podium was successful in Vancouver 2010, but the total amount of investing dropped for the 2012 games. Granted the amount of total money invested is far higher than the 70's/80s/90s, where we hosted two separate Olympic games, and did not even get a gold medal.

Similar, and even worse economies invest more than us, should we step up and pay more, or put the money into other things?

The United States is est. to have spent $300m on their athletes for these games. Canada has spent a fraction of this, and it shows in the medal count.

In my opinion $300m is ridicules, especially for a country so in debt, but some more money can be found somewhere. New Zealand has half the economy of BC alone, and has 2 gold medals, and usually gets more golds than us. Spending what Germany, and Australia do seems logical. Spending smart, and to be competitive, and give our athletes an actual chance.

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Hockey Canada gets funding (which is great!) but we seem to ignore every other sport. More kids play soccer in Canada than any other sport, yet we can't produce any real players. Most of Canada's mens team plays on the TFC reserve team. They aren't good enough to play on the worst team in the MLS. This all comes from a lack of funding.

To prove that, once upon a time USA soccer spent the same amount on soccer as we did, and they were awful. Around 1994 when they got the World Cup they invested a huge amount of money, and now their team regularly qualifies for the World Cup.

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