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Franz Liszt

Keith Ballard Is Worth $4.2 Million If He Gets Used On The Power Play

96 posts in this topic

If you haven't noticed, AV tends to do certain things to players who come from other teams/rookies and haven't played in his system.

1. He tears them down, kind of a purging of the bad habits they may have learned on weaker teams, didn't play in more disciplined two way systems (see Ballard, Booth etc). Guys like Lappy and Higgins fit right in because they were defensively responsible players. See CoHo and Kassian. This can impact their short term confidence because they over think, they stop playing the offensive game they are used to, and don't feel like they are contributing.

2. He then forces them to earn their ice by playing within the system.

3. As they show they can play both ways, accept the team concept he gives them more ice. Then the confidence starts coming back and their offensive game thrives as if you play well in your own end, you get more chances. He did this with Kesler, with Burrows, Naslund (didn't work, too late to change his game) etc.

I think we are starting to see that with Ballard, that his defensive game is coming around and he will see more ice as he continues to play within the team concept. Booth we shall see what happens this year.

But this is simply good coaching, its called getting / training players to buy into the system, and this is why we have won back to back president's trophies.

AV is not a problem he is a terrific coach and knows what he is doing.

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Year 1 was a learning period, year 2 injuries were the issue. This year if he can stay healthy should be a respectable year for him He is not a big D but he doesn't seem to avoid the rough stuff.

I am expecting a good solid season from him.

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Ballard had no history of brain injury until he put on a Vancouver uniform.

Concussions are head injuries.You don't hide them from anybody.They happen and you live with them.

If the team that you work for can not diagnose them do not blame the head injured as they are compromised.

If you think Ballard 'pulled something' you have little to no understanding of brain injuries.

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Sure. People rely entirely on doctors telling them how they feel. On the other hand doctors don't rely on the the patient telling them how they feel at all. They can tell just by looking at you that you have a headache.

Sadly, the truth is medical staff rely a great deal on their patients being forthcoming about how they are feeling and what symptoms they are experiencing. Misdiagnosis becomes quite easy if the patient isn't 100% honest about his condition.

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totally agree should be in top 4

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Baggins can you please clarify if you have any personal knowledge of concussions/brain injuries and or head injuries other than what you have casually read somewhere?

Also,are you suggesting somebody has not been honest?

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Well,if you had serious head injuries beyond concussion into LOC you would know they are potentially life threatening,Baggins.

That is the category Ballard finds himself in.Any concussions suffered after a serious head injury is cumulative,as you know.

If there is a head injury that included LOC then the brain has suffered potential massive brain cell death,already,and that defining anything for a doctor that does not have specific neurological brain injury/trauma training is a waste of time,for starters.

To be specific only highly trained neuruologists that specialize in severe concussions would be able to make an informed decision as to these injured player's specific symptoms and impairments.

No NHL team,that I am aware of ,employ full time neurologists,yet over 10% of NHL players suffered at least one concussion in 2010.

88 NHL players missed at least one game due to concussions in 2011/2012:

http://www.cbc.ca/sports/hockey/opinion/2012/04/concussions-and-suspensions-list.html

It is not about being 'honest',Baggins.It is about having neurologically competent and qualified medical staff that can properly diagnose/evaluate severe brain injuries.

Nobody that suffers tramautic brain injuries fakes them or can eliminate their symptoms or speed up their recovery.If the medical staff are unqualified the players have a serious problem and it is not their credibility at risk.It is their lives.

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Well,if you had serious head injuries beyond concussion into LOC you would know they are potentially life threatening,Baggins.

That is the category Ballard finds himself in.Any concussions suffered after a serious head injury is cumulative,as you know.

If there is a head injury that included LOC then the brain has suffered potential massive brain cell death,already,and that defining anything for a doctor that does not have specific neurological brain injury/trauma training is a waste of time,for starters.

To be specific only highly trained neuruologists that specialize in severe concussions would be able to make an informed decision as to these injured player's specific symptoms and impairments.

No NHL team,that I am aware of ,employ full time neurologists,yet over 10% of NHL players suffered at least one concussion in 2010.

88 NHL players missed at least one game due to concussions in 2011/2012:

http://www.cbc.ca/sp...sions-list.html

It is not about being 'honest',Baggins.It is about having neurologically competent and qualified medical staff that can properly diagnose/evaluate severe brain injuries.

Nobody that suffers tramautic brain injuries fakes them or can eliminate their symptoms or speed up their recovery.If the medical staff are unqualified the players have a serious problem and it is not their credibility at risk.It is their lives.

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Concussions,head injuries,neck injuries,brain tramau or brain injuries are so complex and intricate that special medical attention is the only way to begin to address symptoms and depth of injury,never mind anticipate or hypothecate any recovery.

You hear the coaches and GM's speak of 'the protocol' or the 'concussion protocol'. It really shows progress but the NHL refuses to properly enforce or enhance it.

The NHL is just coming in out of the dark ages in addressing the validity of concussions and associated diseases resulting from brain trauma.

I am not 'blaming' anybody,Baggins.I could care less how inept the Canucks medical staff look to me with some basic knowledge on this subject. I will say they are improving their attitudes and attention but it still seems inadequate on some levels to me.

As somebody that has suffered multiple,serious concussions I can testify that even those regarded as the most prestigious neurologists have serious problems with diagnosis,never mind treatment.How did they expect me to provide them with complex neurological answers? They did not.The only recovery is rest and the time frame is unlimited and unknowable.

Early onset dementia and Parkinson's or deep memory loss and depression is not a reward for coming back one month early to become concussed yet again.

The onus is NEVER on the injured player regarding brain injuries,in addressing his own condition or progress or recovery.

Every brain injured person has deep decision making disabilities,especially immediately following head injury.

Your theory is that players lie about their injuries.Whatever.

Either the NHL team's medical staff have to accept to rely more on neurological specialists or they will continue to endanger player's lives.

Time to come out of the dark ages.Players lives are depending on it and it is only barely being addressed even now.

http://theconcussionblog.com/category/concussions/nhl-concussions/

http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/sports/index.html

Under the N.H.L.’s injury-disclosure policy, clubs may not lie about players’ injuries, but they are not obligated to volunteer specifics. “You guys didn’t ask, so I didn’t give you the information,” Tortorella said in September when asked why the Rangers did not disclose Staal’s concussion.

The N.H.L., the players association and players say the policy is in place to preserve players’ privacy and to protect them from targeted hits that might aggravate injuries.

Dr. Paul S. Echlin, a concussion specialist and researcher from London, Ontario, who has conducted head-injury studies with junior teams, said he agreed with the impulse to preserve privacy. But he also said, “Leadership should come from all areas,” including professional clubs, when it comes to proper treatment of head injuries.

“When you’re dealing with a serious, life-altering thing like a brain injury, you don’t minimize it,” Echlin said. “It’s a player’s individual right not to disclose. But this not giving the full answer is a difficulty I have with it. If you’re going to go forward with concussion prevention, you have to be honest and open about it.”

Echlin pointed to apparent inconsistencies in the application of the in-game concussion protocol, which was announced with great fanfare last season.

.

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Ballard has great speed and showed signs (last season) that he is improving his game. I think MG was hoping that Ballard would replace Erhoff as the teams' puck-moving D. He doesn't seem to have the greatest hockey sense, which may be keeping him off the top 4 or PP. And, alas...he is a tad small for todays' game.

We have little defensive depth so far and unless the rookies can step up, I would be very concerned about trading Ballard. In fact, I wish we still had Rome, as he was a great utility D.

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Concussions,head injuries,neck injuries,brain tramau or brain injuries are so complex and intricate that special medical attention is the only way to begin to address symptoms and depth of injury,never mind anticipate or hypothecate any recovery.

You hear the coaches and GM's speak of 'the protocol' or the 'concussion protocol'. It really shows progress but the NHL refuses to properly enforce or enhance it.

The NHL is just coming in out of the dark ages in addressing the validity of concussions and associated diseases resulting from brain trauma.

I am not 'blaming' anybody,Baggins.I could care less how inept the Canucks medical staff look to me with some basic knowledge on this subject. I will say they are improving their attitudes and attention but it still seems inadequate on some levels to me.

As somebody that has suffered multiple,serious concussions I can testify that even those regarded as the most prestigious neurologists have serious problems with diagnosis,never mind treatment.How did they expect me to provide them with complex neurological answers? They did not.The only recovery is rest and the time frame is unlimited and unknowable.

Early onset dementia and Parkinson's or deep memory loss and depression is not a reward for coming back one month early to become concussed yet again.

The onus is NEVER on the injured player regarding brain injuries,in addressing his own condition or progress or recovery.

Every brain injured person has deep decision making disabilities,especially immediately following head injury.

Your theory is that players lie about their injuries.Whatever.

Either the NHL team's medical staff have to accept to rely more on neurological specialists or they will continue to endanger player's lives.

Time to come out of the dark ages.Players lives are depending on it and it is only barely being addressed even now.

http://theconcussion...hl-concussions/

http://www.cdc.gov/c...orts/index.html

Under the N.H.L.’s injury-disclosure policy, clubs may not lie about players’ injuries, but they are not obligated to volunteer specifics. “You guys didn’t ask, so I didn’t give you the information,” Tortorella said in September when asked why the Rangers did not disclose Staal’s concussion.

The N.H.L., the players association and players say the policy is in place to preserve players’ privacy and to protect them from targeted hits that might aggravate injuries.

Dr. Paul S. Echlin, a concussion specialist and researcher from London, Ontario, who has conducted head-injury studies with junior teams, said he agreed with the impulse to preserve privacy. But he also said, “Leadership should come from all areas,” including professional clubs, when it comes to proper treatment of head injuries.

“When you’re dealing with a serious, life-altering thing like a brain injury, you don’t minimize it,” Echlin said. “It’s a player’s individual right not to disclose. But this not giving the full answer is a difficulty I have with it. If you’re going to go forward with concussion prevention, you have to be honest and open about it.”

Echlin pointed to apparent inconsistencies in the application of the in-game concussion protocol, which was announced with great fanfare last season.

.

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oonly if it was that simple..........

i mean they got him from flordia traded away a first rounder and yet the guy bearly gets any pp time?

Genius AV wow ur such a genius like wow

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The way our coach uses Ballard, I would rather have grabner back. That would help our top 6

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Ballard didn't suddenly go from being capable of playing 20+ minutes per game with regular PP time, to being unusable in the span of a summer.

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Gotta say, really needed to see this again to realize his potential.

We need him to play to his value this year....

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I've had several concussions. The first when I was 10. Would you like the complete history?

Although I highly doubt there is a need to have had a concussion to know that doctors rely a great deal on what their patients tell them. Anybody that's played any competitve sports would also know athletes will often downplay injuries in order to continue playing. It's simply a part of their competitive nature. Only Ballard can tell you if he was 100% honest with the medical staff. I can't say he wasn't any more than you can say he was. Without that information blame simply cannot be placed on the medical staff as it's nothing more than speculation on your part.

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Well, yes he did, because that's exactly what happened.

Explain to me the logic in AV "holding somebody back". AV has one real interest - keeping his job. The way that he keeps his job is by winning games. The way that he wins games isn't by benching "20+ minute per game with regular PP time" defencemen. There is SOMETHING about Ballard that clearly does not fit with something about AV. He either does not understand the system, has a bad attitude, or AV just think he plain stinks.

Either way, I applaud AV. IN NO WAY does he benefit by benching Ballard; in fact, it even places an easy target on him, if anything, by way of all you people thinking that the only thing preventing Keith Ballard from morphing into Duncan Keith is Alain Vigneault. And that's crap.

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