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Why Marijuana should be Legalized


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#31 Shift-4

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:38 PM

It should certainly be legalized for two reasons:

1) To control distribution and prevent underage usage.
2) To generate revenue from taxation.
3) To eliminate illegal trafficking rings (most consumers would shy away from illegal activity if it's easier to obtain by legal means).


:lol:
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#32 Slaytanic Wehrmacht

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:38 PM

I wouldn't say never, there's more of a chance of it happening in Canada. We are allowed to smoke, regulate and sell the plant on April 20th in downtown Vancouver, buy seeds and glass from hemp shops, yet it is strictly illegal to grow it? How stupid does that sound.

One of the main reasons it will be pushed to remain illegal is billions of dollars would be lost in pharmaceutical companies. Why legalize this plant that can treat over 250 medical conditions when we're making more money this way.

Edit: Awesome sig btw, is that Alexi? B)


You know it, bro. B)
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#33 Tystick

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:39 PM

Why marijuana should remain illegal:

People over use it. There is no control or moderation any more.


If someone overuses it, it's most likely that their immediate life isn't so great, and their using it as an escape. The no control thing is BS, if I overuse cheeseburgers, does that mean it should be illegal? How bout coffee? Tylenol?

Guess what? All those things have been overused and are still currently. Yet those aren't illegal? Your argument is void.
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#34 Aladeen

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:45 PM

no thanks, marijuana smells awful and despite what people say it does have negative effects on health especially at a young age & i really dont want to smell that everytime i go outside. Cigarettes should be illegal only substance that is legal that is known to kill you and everyone else around you. such a joke its legal.

call me an old fuddy duddy but ill be the old man with all my brain cells and functioning lungs thank you very much.

If smell was used to determine whether something is illegal or not the manufacturers of Axe body spray would be on death row.
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#35 Hyzer

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:47 PM

Burning brain cells? Really? Look at any scientific study and the worst thing that happens is reversible change in the hippocampus to inhibit the conversion of short term to long term memories. Stop, and it goes back to normal. Why it's not legalized.... prisons make too much money and lobbyists (is that how you say it?)are throwing at the money at the government (In the US, anyway) to keep it illegal.

Edited by hyZar, 08 August 2012 - 05:03 PM.

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#36 ButterBean

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:48 PM

Train by day, Joe Rogan Podcast by Night, All Day.
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#37 higgyfan

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:49 PM

It should certainly be legalized for two reasons:

1) To control distribution and prevent underage usage.
2) To generate revenue from taxation.
3) To eliminate illegal trafficking rings (most consumers would shy away from illegal activity if it's easier to obtain by legal means).

That said, I support the legalization of marijuana because it is, in fact, a slap in the face to a particular portion of uneducated smokers.

CollegeHumor makes all these same points in a pretty humorous way:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M58kGCQLwxU


Agree. I would also like to see the same rules as cigarettes (public smoking) and alcohol (public nuisance, driving and selling to minors). A test for sobriety (while driving) would have to be developed for pot.

Please allow for labelling on the package, including danger to lungs, brain chemistry and marijuana induced psychosis. Talk to anyone working in mental health...the latter is a big problem.
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#38 WeatherWise

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:50 PM

:lol:


I added a third reason while typing my post, and didn't edit that sentence. Apologies. That typo is humorous in our current context of discussion, I must admit.

Edited by WeatherWise, 08 August 2012 - 03:52 PM.

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#39 Rypien.4.Ever

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:52 PM

Amen, I absolutely hate the smell of it if nothing else. And while there are high people that can function alright, just as there are "happy" drunks, for the most part both turn into complete idiots you just can't stand to be around. Although maybe I just live a very fulfilling life where I get high and drunk from it in a figurative sense and see absolutely no need to waste my time being impaired by any kind of drug.

All that junk is like a rocking chair, it keeps you busy and gets you nowhere.


You don't like the smell, boo woo, I hate the smell of curry, should I outlaw that? Surrey wouldn't be too happy.
These generalizations of turning into "complete idiots who you can't stand to be around" are so irellavant, sorry that you met crapty people, deal with it.
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#40 Shift-4

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:55 PM

I added a third reason while typing my post, and didn't edit that sentence. Apologies. That typo is humorous in our current context of discussion, I must admit.


I was going to add to the :lol: with something clever but............couldn't
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#41 Tystick

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 03:56 PM

Amen, I absolutely hate the smell of it if nothing else. And while there are high people that can function alright, just as there are "happy" drunks, for the most part both turn into complete idiots you just can't stand to be around. Although maybe I just live a very fulfilling life where I get high and drunk from it in a figurative sense and see absolutely no need to waste my time being impaired by any kind of drug.

All that junk is like a rocking chair, it keeps you busy and gets you nowhere.


If you hate the smell and don't want to use it, fine, no ones going to force you, but you're going to miss out on one of life's great experiences.
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#42 Tystick

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:01 PM

Agree. I would also like to see the same rules as cigarettes (public smoking) and alcohol (public nuisance, driving and selling to minors). A test for sobriety (while driving) would have to be developed for pot.

Please allow for labelling on the package, including danger to lungs, brain chemistry and marijuana induced psychosis. Talk to anyone working in mental health...the latter is a big problem.


Why? So you can scare people with things that aren't proven true or false? I agree with labeling the package of dangers associated, but only until they are proven as such.
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#43 Guest_BuckFoston_*

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:20 PM

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If you hate the smell and don't want to use it, fine, no ones going to force you, but you're going to miss out on one of life's great experiences.


You've got to be joking. One of life's greatest experiences? Smoking weed? Guess what, I made that statement fully aware of what smoking is like. I've tried it before. Average pot, the best pot, all the same it did nothing for me and I found it to be a profuse waste of my time.

Going to bed every night with the girl of my dreams, traveling the world, one day building something with my own hands - now those are life's greatest experiences. Puffing a joint, getting wasted, or doing any of this other trivial nonsense isn't one of them.
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#44 Slaytanic Wehrmacht

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:22 PM

You've got to be joking. One of life's greatest experiences? Smoking weed? Guess what, I made that statement fully aware of what smoking is like. I've tried it before. Average pot, the best pot, all the same it did nothing for me and I found it to be a profuse waste of my time.

Going to bed every night with the girl of my dreams, traveling the world, one day building something with my own hands - now those are life's greatest experiences. Puffing a joint, getting wasted, or doing any of this other trivial nonsense isn't one of them.


No offense bud, but if I had that kind of life, girl of my dreams, traveling the world, etc...I wouldn't be hanging out on CDC, talking about "trivial nonsense".
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#45 ronthecivil

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:24 PM

You've got to be joking. One of life's greatest experiences? Smoking weed? Guess what, I made that statement fully aware of what smoking is like. I've tried it before. Average pot, the best pot, all the same it did nothing for me and I found it to be a profuse waste of my time.

Going to bed every night with the girl of my dreams, traveling the world, one day building something with my own hands - now those are life's greatest experiences. Puffing a joint, getting wasted, or doing any of this other trivial nonsense isn't one of them.


What, no mention of having great abs, a cool ride or hip clothes? Don't be so modest dude!
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#46 Dion Phaneuf

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:26 PM

LEGAL !
* only puff roughly once a month...
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#47 Armada

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:27 PM

Chronic pot smokers have issues with remembering things, I don't need a study to tell me that, I can tell after spending a minute with buddies who smoke all day, and have for 30+ years.


Wrong watch "Super High Me" where the guy smokes marijuana for 30 days straight the only decline he had was respiratory which dropped 2%. His IQ stayed the same.

Your friends might just be idiots?

I don't think you need to be a genius to realize that legalizing marijuana will have huge economic positives, especially in the US.

Edited by Armada, 08 August 2012 - 04:28 PM.

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#48 Guest_BuckFoston_*

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:28 PM

No offense bud, but if I had that kind of life, girl of my dreams, traveling the world, etc...I wouldn't be hanging out on CDC, talking about "trivial nonsense".


I "hang out" here in the mornings or when I'm out and about waiting for others. I'm not here 24 hours a day. It's my one social media vice, so it can be forgiven.
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#49 Guest_BuckFoston_*

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:29 PM

What, no mention of having great abs, a cool ride or hip clothes? Don't be so modest dude!


No hip ride and the abs have been slacking, but as soon as everything is in tip top shape, you'll be the first to know.
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#50 Shift-4

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:30 PM

Wrong watch "Super High Me" where the guy smokes marijuana for 30 days straight the only decline he had was respiratory which dropped 2%. His IQ stayed the same.




IQ and memory are not the same thing
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#51 ronthecivil

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:33 PM

Wrong watch "Super High Me" where the guy smokes marijuana for 30 days straight the only decline he had was respiratory which dropped 2%. His IQ stayed the same.

Your friends might just be idiots?

I don't think you need to be a genius to realize that legalizing marijuana will have huge economic positives, especially in the US.


I think it's pretty safe to say that it's not good for you. Trying to portray it as healthy isn't going to win any hearts and minds.

That said it shouldn't matter if it's healthy or not. As much as it might not be healthy it's certainly not any worse (or even as bad as) the already legal booze and cigarettes.
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#52 Slaytanic Wehrmacht

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:33 PM

IQ and memory are not the same thing


Agreed...just as IQ and intelligence are not the same thing...if anything IQ represents only a type of intelligence
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#53 Kumquats

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:36 PM

Why marijuana should remain illegal:

People over use it. There is no control or moderation any more.

The one time I overdosed I fell asleep.
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#54 Tystick

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:37 PM

You've got to be joking. One of life's greatest experiences? Smoking weed? Guess what, I made that statement fully aware of what smoking is like. I've tried it before. Average pot, the best pot, all the same it did nothing for me and I found it to be a profuse waste of my time.

Going to bed every night with the girl of my dreams, traveling the world, one day building something with my own hands - now those are life's greatest experiences. Puffing a joint, getting wasted, or doing any of this other trivial nonsense isn't one of them.


Either you're lying or it didn't work for you the first time (which is common). Either way, you didn't experience it the same way myself and others have. I don't disagree with you, those are great life experiences, but you're limiting yourself. Pot is more than just getting high and eating chips. It brings out the positivity in everything, it's incredible.
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#55 Hyzer

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:38 PM

Agree. I would also like to see the same rules as cigarettes (public smoking) and alcohol (public nuisance, driving and selling to minors). A test for sobriety (while driving) would have to be developed for pot.

Please allow for labelling on the package, including danger to lungs, brain chemistry and marijuana induced psychosis. Talk to anyone working in mental health...the latter is a big problem.


Causation =/= Correlation.
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#56 vancanfan

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:38 PM

Wrong watch "Super High Me" where the guy smokes marijuana for 30 days straight the only decline he had was respiratory which dropped 2%. His IQ stayed the same.

Your friends might just be idiots?

I don't think you need to be a genius to realize that legalizing marijuana will have huge economic positives, especially in the US.


Years of use, not 30 days :picard:

the idiocy level of this thread just keeps moving along :rolleyes:

anyone can assume this or that would happen if it was legalized, but the reality is no one will know until it is, so keep dreaming and puffing away :picard:

we already have enough morons in this country who make bad decisions without the use of marijuana, legalizing it would only make problems worse, any argument suggesting otherwise is not even worthy or a reply.
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#57 Hyzer

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:40 PM

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Years of use, not 30 days :picard:

the idiocy level of this thread just keeps moving along :rolleyes:

anyone can assume this or that would happen if it was legalized, but the reality is no one will know until it is, so keep dreaming and puffing away :picard:

we already have enough morons in this country who make bad decisions without the use of marijuana, legalizing it would only make problems worse, any argument suggesting otherwise is not even worthy or a reply.


Ban Alcohol. It will solve more problems than almost all other illegal drugs (cocaine, E, meth, etc).

Here's some more exciting, factual information:

" According to the 1993 General Social Survey, nearly one in 10 adult Canadians (9.2%) report problems with their drinking. The most common problems affect physical health (5%) and financial position (4.7%). The majority of Canadians (73.4%), report that they have been harmed in some way at some point by the drinking of another person; 41% of all Canadians reported that they had experienced some form of harm in the past 12 months.
There were 6,700 deaths and 86,000 hospitalizations associated with alcohol in 1992. Motor vehicle accidents accounted for the largest number of alcohol related deaths while accidental falls and alcohol dependence syndrome accounted for the largest number of alcohol-related hospitalizations. Impaired driving is a major cause of death; among fatally injured drivers, 45% had some alcohol in their blood and 38% were over the legal limit of .08% Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC). About 20% of current drinkers report that they have driven after consuming two or more drinks in one hour."

Now all Illicit Drugs:

"There are many health and social problems related to the use of illegal drugs, but a number of these problems have more to do with the legal status of the drugs than with the nature of the drug itself. As with legal drugs, risks are related to dose, frequency of use, route of administration and characteristics of the user. It is difficult to identify the effects of a drug when it is not the singular cause of a problem. A disorder may be said to be "drug-related" because a drug is present in the urine, blood-stream or elsewhere in the body. The actual role of the drug in causing problems is not known. In addition, because the International Classification of Diseases does not distinguish between licit and illicit drugs, statistics on drug-related problems and deaths include an unknown contribution from legal drugs.
.
Approximately one quarter of the people who reported using illegal drugs, steroids or solvents in the 1994 survey stated that their use had caused some harm in their lifetime (30%) or in the past 12 months (14%). This ranged from 17.5% for harm on physical health to 1.5% for harm caused to their children. In 1991 and 1992, more than half of the people accused of homicide used a substance of some kind (including alcohol) at the time of the incident. About 4% of all homicide victims were on drugs; one in ten had both alcohol and other drugs in their systems.
The number of deaths and potential years of life lost attributable to the use of illicit drugs have been calculated in a 1996 study of the costs of substance misuse in Canada. It is estimated that there were 732 deaths due to use of illicit drugs in 1992 (.4% of total mortality). Suicide accounts for 42% of illicit drug-related deaths; opiate and cocaine poisoning account for 14% and 9% respectively. In 1992, there were 61 AIDS-related deaths in injection drug users (8% of all illicit drug-related deaths); this number is increasing each year as the number of HIV-infected users rises throughout Canada (see section on HIV and injection drug use above). Mortality due to illicit drug use is relatively infrequent compared with alcohol and tobacco-related mortality, but illicit drug deaths involve younger people. There is a great deal of provincial variation in death rates due to illicit drugs. The greatest number of deaths per capita occur in BC (4.7 per 100,000 population in 1992); BC remains the highest, with annual overdose rates averaging more than 300 persons. Alberta (3.1) and Quebec (2.8) also have rates above the national average.
In 1992, there were 7,100 hospitalizations and 58,600 hospitalizations as a result of illicit drug use. Drug psychosis (17%), assaults (17%) and cocaine use (16%) accounted for about 50% of all illicit drug-related hospital admissions. The greatest proportion of hospital days due to illicit drugs is for drug psychosis, cocaine use, and assault. The provincial pattern in potential years of life lost, hospitalizations and hospital days reflect that of mortality rates. Highest rates of hospitalizations are in BC (39 per 100,000) and the lowest in Newfoundland (15 per 100,000)."

So. Still less hospitalizations than Alcohol... let's look at the economic aspects of abuse for each:

"It is estimated that substance use cost more than $18.4 billion in Canada in 1992 ($649 per capita), which is 2.7% of the Gross Domestic Product. Alcohol accounts for approximately $7.5 billion in costs. The largest economic costs of alcohol are $4.14 billion for lost productivity due to morbidity and premature mortality, $1.36 billion for law enforcement and $1.30 billion in direct health care costs. Tobacco accounts for more than $9.5 billion in costs, and illicit drugs cost the economy $1.4 billion. The largest cost due to illicit drugs is lost productivity due to morbidity and premature death ($823 million), and a substantial portion of the costs ($400 million) are for law enforcement (including criminal-justice system costs). In general, the largest economic costs of substance use are from lost productivity due to morbidity and premature mortality, direct health care costs and law enforcement."

Here's some actual facts about Marijuana for anyone else interested:
"During the past thirty years, researchers funded by the US federal government have examined the ways in which marijuana effects the user and society. This has led to the exposure, and refutation, of a number of myths about marijuana. These myths include:

1. Marijuana’s harms have been proved scientifically: in fact, the US National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse concluded in 1972 that while marijuana was not entirely safe, its dangers had been grossly overstated. Since then, researchers have conducted thousands of studies of humans, animals and cell cultures. None reveal any findings dramatically different from those described by the US Commission in 1972. In 1995, based on thirty years of scientific research, editors of the British medical journal the Lancet concluded that "the smoking of cannabis, even long term, is not harmful to health."

2. Marijuana has no medicinal value: marijuana has been shown to be effective in reducing the nausea caused by cancer chemotherapy, stimulating appetite in AIDS patients, and reducing intraocular pressure in people with glaucoma. There is also a great deal of evidence that marijuana reduces muscle spasticity in patients with neurological disorder, is a very powerful pain killer, and is effective as an anti-epileptic in patients unresponsive to other medications. A synthetic THC capsule is available by prescription, but it is not as effective as smoked marijuana for many patients. Pure THC also seems to produce more unpleasant psychoactive side-effects than smoked marijuana. Many people use marijuana as a medicine, and in most countries, including Canada, this means risking arrest (see below under legal situation in Canada).

3. Marijuana is highly addictive: in fact, most people who smoke marijuana do so only occasionally. a small minority of users (less than 1%) smoke marijuana on a daily or near daily basis. An even smaller minority develop psychological dependence on marijuana. Some people who smoke marijuana heavily and frequently stop without difficulty; others seek help. Marijuana does not cause physical dependence, and if there are any withdrawal symptoms at all, these are very mild.

4. Marijuana is a "gateway" drug: in fact, marijuana does not cause people to use hard drugs. What the gateway theory presents as a causal explanation is a statistical association between common and uncommon drugs, an association that changes over time as different drugs increase and decrease in prevalence. Marijuana is the most popular drug in most western countries today and so people who have used less popular drugs such as heroin or cocaine are, on the basis of probability alone, likely to have tried marijuana. But most marijuana users never use any other illegal drugs, so marijuana is more akin to a closed gate than to a gateway.

5. Marijuana policy in the Netherlands is a failure: for more than twenty years, Dutch citizens over eighteen have been permitted to buy and use cannabis in government-regulated coffee shops. The policy has not resulted in an escalation in cannabis use. Rates of use are significantly lower than those in the United States. The Dutch public overwhelmingly supports this policy of normalization. A recent survey by the Centre for Drug Research at the University of Amsterdam found only two to three percent of Dutch over the age of 12 had used marijuana over a one-month period. In the United States, where it is illegal to grow, purchase or use
marijuana, a 1996 government study concluded around five percent of the population used the drug at least once a month (rates for use in the last year are 34% for the US and 29% for the Netherlands). The number of heroin users, the murder rate, crime-related deaths and the incarceration rate are all considerably higher in the US as compared to the Netherlands.

6. Marijuana kills brain cells: in fact, none of the tests used to detect brain damage in humans have found harm from marijuana, even from long-term high-dose use.

7. Marijuana causes amotivational syndrome: in fact, researchers have failed to find evidence of marijuana induced amotivational syndrome. People who are constantly intoxicated, whatever the drug, are unlikely to be productive members of society, but there is nothing about marijuana specifically that causes loss of drive. In laboratory studies, subjects given high doses of marijuana for several days or weeks show no sign of decrease in work motivation. In the workplace, marijuana users tend to earn higher wages than non-users, and college students who use marijuana have the same grade as non-users

8. Marijuana impairs memory and cognition: marijuana produces immediate, temporary changes in thoughts, perceptions and information processing. There is no convincing evidence that heavy long-term use permanently impairs memory or other cognitive functions.

9. Marijuana causes mental illness: in fact, there is no convincing scientific evidence that marijuana causes psychological damage or mental illness in teenagers or adults. Marijuana can induce feelings of panic and paranoia, but these effects are temporary.

10. Marijuana causes crime: in fact, there is no evidence that marijuana causes crime; and marijuana actually decreases, rather than increases, aggression.

11. Marijuana damages the fetus: in fact, studies of newborns, infants and children show no consistent physical, developmental, or cognitive deficits related to prenatal marijuana exposure.

12. Marijuana impairs the immune system: in fact, there is no evidence that marijuana users are more susceptible to infections than non-users. The finding of an association between tobacco smoking and lung infections in AIDS patients warrants further research into possible harms from marijuana smoking in immune-suppressed persons.

13. Marijuana is more damaging to the lungs than tobacco: moderate smoking of marijuana appears to pose minimal damage to the lungs; marijuana users typically smoke much less often than tobacco users and so risk of serious lung damage is lower. There are no reports of lung cancer related solely to marijuana, but the possibility of cancer in heavy users cannot be ruled out. Unlike heavy tobacco smokers, heavy marijuana smokers show no obstruction of the lung’s small airways and so do not develop emphysema.

14. Marijuana is a major cause of traffic accidents: in fact there is no compelling evidence that marijuana contributes substantially to traffic accidents and fatalities. In driving studies, marijuana produces little or no car-handling impairment. Unlike alcohol, which increases risky driving practices, marijuana tends to make subjects more cautions. When THC is detected in the blood of fatally injured drivers, alcohol is almost always detected as well. A roadside breathtest for THC has recently been developed.

15. Marijuana is more potent today than in the past: potency data have been kept from the early 1980s to the present, and show that there has been no increase in the average THC content of marijuana. Even if marijuana potency were to increase, it would not necessarily make it more dangerous since users would smoke less to get the same level of psychoactive effect
In November of this year, the British medical journal Lancet concluded its editorial on marijuana by stating that "on the medical evidence available, moderate indulgence in cannabis has little effect on health, and the decision to ban or to legalise cannabis should be based on other considerations.""

That's my rant.

http://www.cfdp.ca/sen1841.htm

Edited by hyZar, 08 August 2012 - 04:55 PM.

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#58 The Brahma Bull

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:41 PM

Anyone know if anymore research has gone into this?
'Teens who smoke pot at risk for later schizophrenia, psychosis'
http://www.health.ha...is-201103071676

Edited by The Brahma Bull, 08 August 2012 - 04:41 PM.

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#59 Kamero89

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:43 PM

I don't drink or do any drugs, so I feel my opinion is completely objective here. A TON of studies have shown cannabis is far less harmful to ones body than alcohol. EVERYone that I have heard who says it should be illegal usually says "ALL DRUGS ARE BAD!" well newsflash most of those people drink and alcohol is a drug. It is not magical ferries that are making you have a "buzz" and get tipsy.

Most of the illegal drug industry is the selling on cannabis, it would really cripple their industry if it was legalized. And it would be really good if we got rid of a lot of drug dealers on the street.

The pot smokers who smell bad are usually the ones who abuse it, people who abuse alcohol and cigarettes don't exactly smell like angels. Not a valid argument.
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#60 Kamero89

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:45 PM

Ban Alcohol. It will solve more problems than almost all other illegal drugs (cocaine, E, meth, etc).

Brilliant post. Sorry to state the obvious, but for anyone who does not get it, he is being sarcastic.
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