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hsedin33

Scientists Warn Arctic Ice Could Vanish in 10 years

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So we can blame the Arctic on global warming then - as it's not doing it's job of reflecting sunlight back to space. ;)

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Even if we stopped 100% of all global emissions today, we're still beyond the point of no return.

We'll have to adapt to rising sea levels. Countries like Bangladesh are the ones in real trouble.

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Even if we stopped 100% of all global emissions today, we're still beyond the point of no return.

We'll have to adapt to rising sea levels. Countries like Bangladesh are the ones in real trouble.

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IMO we aren't suppose to have ice caps in the first place. It was a result of large asteroid impacts. Much like the one the wiped out the dinosaurs. Things are just returning to norm. Until the next impact of course.

***article***

Wendy Zukerman, Australasia reporter

A massive asteroid hit the Timor Sea around 35 million years ago - and the impact apparently contributed to the formation of the Antarctic ice sheets.

So says Andrew Glikson, a specialist in the study of extraterrestrial impacts, from the Planetary Science Institute at the Australian National University in Canberra, who analysed a dome found 2.5 kilometres below the Timor Sea, about 300 kilometres off Australia's north west coast.

Based on the structure of the dome, called Mount Ashmore, there were two obvious explanations for its formation: from a mud volcano or from the movement of tectonic plates.

But using a barrage of tests including scanning electron microscopy and seismic surveys, as well as chemical analysis of the rocks, Glikson concluded that the dome was the result of an asteroid crashing into the Earth at such speeds that it caused the Earth's crust to rebound (Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, DOI: 10.1080/08120099.2010.481327).

Images from scanning electron microscopy showed that the cracks and pulverised rocks throughout the dome were unlike those seen in tectonic plate movements.

Seismic surveys and above-ground magnetic studies revealed the dome's massive dimensions. Its diameter of over 50 kilometres and vertical axis several kilometres in height are significantly larger than previously found mud volcanoes - making this an unlikely candidate for one. So far the largest mud volcanoes, found in Azerbaijan, are only 10km in diameter.

According to ABC News, Glikson says the asteroid that created the dome was probably 5 to 10km wide.

Discovery News reports that:

"Smaller [asteroid] impacts only create an impact crater. But during larger impacts, something different may happen: an impact dome or central peak rises up in the middle of the crater."

In the case of Mount Ashmore, rock rebounded upwards at the point of impact, compensating for the huge compressive punch of energy delivered in collision.

And when this asteroid collided with Earth, it wasn't alone.

Australian Geographic reports:

"Several other craters have been documented from a similar time, including one of the Western Australian coast measuring 120km in diameter. Another asteroid impact structure in Siberia is 100km in size."

Glikson believes that this asteroid storm may have shifted the Earth's plates to create a gap between Antarctica and South America, known as the Drake Passage, which still exists today.

Discovery News writes:

"The rush of water through Drake Passage isolated Antarctica's climate from the rest of the globe, and fostered the growth of a large ice sheet."

According to Australian Geographic, these ice sheets in combination with newly-emerging currents around Antarctica may have allowed cooler water into the world's ocean, and possibly resulted in a well-documented cooling of the planet.

http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/shortsharpscience/2010/06/wendy-zukerman-australasia-rep.html

------------

Fairly old article but on par in what I have always personally believed. Without large asteroid strikes our planet is normally much warmer. Of course a little global warming speeds things up, but I don't believe it has a significant impact.

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We're going to have to massively scrub CO2 from the atmosphere if we indeed want to reverse the damage already done. Technology is available and we should be doing it now, but alas we're still debating whether the problem actually exists.

Going to have to lose/displace a significant part of the coastal population before real action is taken. At that point it may be too late. It's not like any solution is a quick fix. We'll have to adapt for the time being.

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IMO we aren't suppose to have ice caps in the first place. It was a result of large asteroid impacts. Much like the one the wiped out the dinosaurs. Things are just returning to norm. Until the next impact of course.

Fairly old article but on par in what I have always personally believed. Without large asteroid strikes our planet is normally much warmer. Of course a little global warming speeds things up, but I don't believe it has a significant impact.

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We're going to have to massively scrub CO2 from the atmosphere if we indeed want to reverse the damage already done. Technology is available and we should be doing it now, but alas we're still debating whether the problem actually exists.

Going to have to lose/displace a significant part of the coastal population before real action is taken. At that point it may be too late. It's not like any solution is a quick fix. We'll have to adapt for the time being.

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We're going to have to massively scrub CO2 from the atmosphere if we indeed want to reverse the damage already done. Technology is available and we should be doing it now, but alas we're still debating whether the problem actually exists.

Going to have to lose/displace a significant part of the coastal population before real action is taken. At that point it may be too late. It's not like any solution is a quick fix. We'll have to adapt for the time being.

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If our planet reverted back to the stage when it had no significant glacier or polar ice formations due to warming, hundreds of millions if not billions of people would suffer and eventually die.

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If we didn't have ice caps, or an ice age for that matter, there's a chance that our species could have become extinct a long time ago.

Also, your personal beliefs mean nothing when put next to empirical evidence. It's a fact that man is contributing to the alteration of the planet's climate.

If our planet reverted back to the stage when it had no significant glacier or polar ice formations due to warming, hundreds of millions if not billions of people would suffer and eventually die.

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Let's face it. It is out of our hands. There is no hope of turning away from fossil fuels. There is too much money in it. All we can hope for is that people can handle the consequences of what the Earth is going to dish out. We can pretend that we are going to do something significant to change our fate...but lets face facts. The anti-global warming lobby has won the PR fight and we are going to burn every last drop of oil we possibly can. I suggest buying a bit of inland property and/or a boat.

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If we didn't have ice caps or an ice age, there's a chance we could have been extinct? I suppose there's a 'chance' for many things who knows for sure. Not you or I.

My personal beliefs are based off asteroid impacts[which there is plenty of evidence of] and physics. The atmosphere being clouded with ash, locking heat out long enough for an ice age. It only makes sense to me.

Again by the time our planet reverts, if it does, who knows what kind of technological advancements there are. We have proven to be quite an adaptable species if anything.

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Overpopulation and food supply is going to be a problem, regardless of what happens to the poles.

Perhaps nothing is being done to correct either problem because it's believed that a population correction is both inevitable and, in effect, desired. Of course, 'the poor' will be wiped out first. That will be an acceptable start for those in control. Real problems start when 'the poor' figures out what's going on and starts fighting back.

Revolution and/or evolution. It's what's in store for us.

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What annoys me as a Canadian is that we've gone from pro-environment, goodie-good superstars to the bad guy in a few years.

It's nice that we have the sands, though. At least for those in charge of raping it. But as Canadians the only thing going for us, as far as being eco-friendly, is that hey, at least we're not as bad as the Americans. Per capita though?

At least in Canada there are a ton of lakes. Of course we'll eventually sell all our water the Americans, but for the time being it's nice to have all that water.

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Adapt or die...really nothing more to elaborate on on the subject. As to the "revolution" suggestion...you're right, the "poor" will be wiped out first, because they are going to be the ones revolting against "those in charge"...hate to say this, but a global mass extinction may just be what the Earth needs to survive this. Human life, essentially, at least in the grand scheme, is meaningless...99.9% of all species, plant or animal that have ever inhabited this planet are now extinct, and humanity's had a great run...but nothing lives forever....the only thing that will survive this unharmed for the most part...is the planet itself.

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What annoys me as a Canadian is that we've gone from pro-environment, goodie-good superstars to the bad guy in a few years.

It's nice that we have the sands, though. At least for those in charge of raping it. But as Canadians the only thing going for us, as far as being eco-friendly, is that hey, at least we're not as bad as the Americans. Per capita though?

At least in Canada there are a ton of lakes. Of course we'll eventually sell all our water the Americans, but for the time being it's nice to have all that water.

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