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Tortorella's Rant

Ten Worst Draft Picks Since 2000

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Nikita Filatov should be on this list.

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or, and as a Jets fan this destroys me, fricken Mark Scheifele. Why didn't you trade down if you were going to do that? Or, like, call an audible because you didn't think Coutourier would be available, and just... take him instead. Terrible choice.

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I'm not anti-Scheifele. I've been following his progress closely, actually, and I'm really pleased with his development. It's just one of those situations where, they walk up at #7, and Coutourier is sitting there, and everyone's drooling over him because he's basically a sure-thing, and they go 'well, we could take this top tier prospect that fell into our laps, or we could roll the dice on this guy that we see potential in' - If the Jets had traded down to, even, 15, picked up a 3rd rounder along the way, they could have gotten Scheifele anyways. I just think that passing on Coutourier and hoping that your guy will come through to you is a risky play, especially for a team that is not as strong both in the NHL and in their prospect pools to justify it. I feel like, if I were in that position, I have a lot of needs and Coutourier will fill one. Scheifele might.

TL:DR - I don't think Scheifele is bad. I think Coutourier is better and I would have picked him. Like I said earlier, it's a McIlrath/Fowler situation. I don't think McIlrath is trash, I just think it's a bad decision to walk away from a superior player because you had your eye on someone.

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My list (for whatever reason I already had like a half written up list of the worst picks of all-time, so I just did a little bit of work to make this one).

Lars Jonsson gets a bit of a pass since Boston was rewarded a 2nd round pick in 2006 for compensation for being unable to sign him. The compensation pick wasn't very good (Yury Alexandrov... yeah), but added onto the fact that 2000 was just an awful draft year, I felt like I would cut him some slack.

10

Blake Wheeler (RW) drafted 5th Overall in 2004 by the Phoenix Coyotes

Like Justin Schultz this year, Wheeler became a FA after completing University, where he signed with Boston. A good player, but a bad pick for the Coyotes.

9

Thomas Hickey (D) drafted 4th Overall in 2007 by the LA Kings

LA went off the board to select Hickey, and picked him ahead of defenceman such as Karl Alzner, Kevin Shattenkirk, and Ryan McDonagh. Has struggled in the AHL, and is low on the Kings depth chart. Time has began to run out.

8

Mikhail Yakubov © drafted 10th Overall in 2000 by the Chicago Blackhawks

The last of a long list of poor top 10 picks in 2000, Yakubov never lived up to his hype of being the next Russian star. He put up 12 points in 53 games before bolting back to Russia in 2006.

7

Nikita Filatov (LW) drafted 6th Overall in 2008 by the Columbus Blue Jackets

Had issues with coaching, and after 3 uneventful seasons Filatov was traded to Ottawa for a 3rd round pick where his struggles in the NHL continued. His NHL career likely ended as he signed a contract in the KHL earlier this year.

6

Stanislav Chistov (W) drafted 5th Overall in 2001 by the Anaheim Ducks

Just 1 season after being drafted, Chistov showed promise by putting up 30 points in his first NHL season. Over his next 2 seasons (he played 2 in Russia in between) he put up a combined total of 31, before returning to Russia for good.

5

Brent Krahn (G) drafted 9th Overall in 2000 by the Calgary Flames

Regarded as one of the next big Goaltenders, Krahn never became anything more than a big goalie (6’4 232lbs). In 1 career NHL game, Krahn has a GAA of 9.00.

4

Petr Taticek © drafted 9th Overall in 2002 by the Florida Panthers

The struggles for Taticek began quickly after being drafted. His numbers in the OHL did not improve, and he then went on to futile production in the AHL the years after. Taticek got a brief 3 game stint with the Panthers in 2006, but never played in the NHL again.

3

Alexandre Picard (LW) drafted 8th Overall in 2004 by the Columbus Blue Jackets

Many people point to the Blue Jackets struggles with drafting Russian prospects early in the 1st round to be a big reason in their futility, however Picard was proof that it didn’t matter where they drafted players from. Picard has had 5 stints in the NHL, his last in 2010, and has put up 2 points in 67 games.

2

Alexander Svitov © drafted 3rd Overall in 2001 by the Tampa Bay Lightning

Svitov was a can’t miss prospect, though his offensive game was suspect, he was a big body not afraid to throw his weight around, and had been playing against men in Russia since he was just 16. However Svitov was taken away from the game of hockey for nearly a whole year by the Russian Army, and his game never recovered from it. He played in 179 games with the Blue Jackets (after being traded for Daryl Sydor) before returning back to Russia.

1

Hugh Jessiman (RW) drafted 12th Overall in 2003 by the New York Rangers

The 2003 draft is considered to be one of the best of all-time. Numerous superstars and all-stars were selected in the 1st round, along with a handful of respectable depth and role players. And then there was Hugh Jessiman. After a dominating performance in his Freshman year in Dartmouth, it seemed that Hugh was going to be a force in the NHL for years to come. However, his game began to slip, and 2 years later Jessiman only put up 2 points in 12 games for Dartmouth before leaving to play in the AHL, where he has spent nearly his whole career. With the exception of a 2 game call-up that could almost be marked as a sympathy call, Jessiman has never graduated into the big leagues.

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Rick DP would top my list, just because of the money he has been paid in comparison to his return. High draft picks bust all the time, but at least most disappear without a wheelbarrow full of money.

Since signing his 'lifetime' contract, he can arguably be said to be earning $375K per win, based on some quick math. By comparison, if we had paid Luongo $375K/win over the same period of time (6 years), he would have earned an average of $14M/year.

DP also boasts a lifetime 2-7 record in the Playoffs. Two Playoff wins! He's going to be 31 years old in a few days. Even if he had been healthy these past several years, his game would probably naturally be leading into decline due to his age.

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Seriously a pet peeve of mind... is it really that difficult for you to also paste the article in the thread instead of forcing us all to click your link and load another page? I mean really...

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My list (for whatever reason I already had like a half written up list of the worst picks of all-time, so I just did a little bit of work to make this one).

Lars Jonsson gets a bit of a pass since Boston was rewarded a 2nd round pick in 2006 for compensation for being unable to sign him. The compensation pick wasn't very good (Yury Alexandrov... yeah), but added onto the fact that 2000 was just an awful draft year, I felt like I would cut him some slack.

10

Blake Wheeler (RW) drafted 5th Overall in 2004 by the Phoenix Coyotes

Like Justin Schultz this year, Wheeler became a FA after completing University, where he signed with Boston. A good player, but a bad pick for the Coyotes.

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Pavel Brendl

Drafted in 1999. 4th Overall.

245 points in 129 WHL games.

Looked like a future superstar but never flourished in the NHL. Only having 22 points in 78 games with 3 teams.

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He's gone to the KHL for the 2012-13 season and has 3 points in 2 games (2 goals). Last year he was close a point per game in the AHL. And he's only 22.

He's been a major bust so far, but he could still revive his career. You never know.

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1. Brent Krahn, 9th overall in 2000 by the Calgary Flames

Disregarding the clear-as-day precedents that show drafting a goaltender in the first round rarely pays off, former Flames GM Craig Button looked between the pipes at the 2000 draft, drafting Brent Krahn, who was NHL's Central Scouting Service's top ranked puck-stopper.

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