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Sharpshooter

They have been waiting for 100 years: What is in the mysterious package?

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Translation: collection of crap that will go to some museum I'll avoid when visiting Norway.

It was either see what this was, or have a day off fap to some really good looking Latinas.. I obviously chose wrong.

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Well I was way off.....

...I thought it was going to be a "Sweden Sucks!" T-Shirt...

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Are you implying vagina's are square?

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Tension rose when the museum directors got through the first level of packaging, only to come upon another layer of paper with another rope tied around it. Then, they finally got to the actual items, including a white banner with gold tassels that said "Fra Kongen" which translates to "From the King." There were several other banner and flag-like decorations in the national colors of red, blue and white.

"This is like gold for us museum people," one of the museum directors told the audience.

As a video about the package previously released on the Verdens Gang website explained, a man named Johan Nygard gave the package to town administrators, telling them that its contents would "benefit and delight future generations."

According to the video, little is known about Nygard, but he helped to plan a celebration for the 300-year anniversary of a battle that the townsmen won against Scottish mercenaries in 1612.

That fact led some to speculate that the items in the package might be tied to the anniversary. Sure enough, among the documents inside were telegrams that the museum workers said were related to the celebration of the victory, and committee work for what might be a memorial of the battle.

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Battle of Kringen

Kringen_1612_logo4.jpg

In 1612 a force of some 550 Scots arrived in Gudbrandsdalen under the command of Captain (later Major) Alexander Ramsay ¹ with a company of Caithness men lead by Captain George Sinclair ² of Stirkoke (for many years George Sinclair was thought to be the leader and Ramsay was forgotten). George Sinclair was a captain in Samuel Cockburn's regiment in Sweden 1610-12, and had recruited for James Spens for the Swedish Army 1611-12.

He was allegedly accused of forcibly taking children and servants onto the transport ships. Alexander Ramsay recruited with Robert Kerr and Captain George Hay ³ (also of Samuel Cockburn's regiment), and had sailed from Dundee with his company. They were simply passing through the valley intent on reaching Sweden, which was then at war with Norway and Denmark over the territory of Kalmar in the south of Scandinavia. Their passage through Norway had been peaceful since their landing at the Isfjorden on the coast of Romsdal and Møre, and they could not have anticipated what awaited them at Kringen.

They did not know that young men conscripted from the valley had been massacred in the Kalmar conflict, and that the farmers from Gudbrandsdalen were determined to resist them. Plans had been laid for an ambush, and the ambush was to be triggered by local girl, Guri, who was to watch the column as it made its slow passage along the old King’s road.

To further distract the Scots from the ambush preparations, a man rode sitting backwards on his horse. Once the right moment arrived, Guri, watching from the mountain top above Otta blew a blast on her lur, a long wooden horn, traditional to the area.

Prillar-Guri%252C%2Bart%2Bby%2BTheodor%2BKittelsen.jpg

Tradition has it that the ambush started with logs and rocks crashing down on the Scots from the steep mountainside and blocking the road preventing advance or withdrawal, and tradition also has it that George Sinclair was felled with a silver bullet from a single musket shot fired by Berdon Sejelstad. 450 farmers fell on the Scots with their axes and scythes and fierce hand-to-hand conflict ensued that left the river running red with blood.

Stroemdal_Maleri_fra_Kringen_malt1897_900bg.jpg

After one and a half hours, only 134 Scots remained alive though it is thought some escaped. The farmers lost 6 men. It is thought that the Scots had only a few weapons between them, expecting to be armed when they reached Sweden.

The survivors were taken prisoner and led off to Kvam, and were to be taken to the Akershus Fortress in Oslo to await their fate, but the farmers had their harvest to think of, and again, tradition has it, they began to execute the prisoners. Certainly only 18, were taken to Oslo and forced into Danish-Norwegian service.

Four of the officers, Alexander Ramsay , James Scott, unofficially recruited in Scotland 4, Captain Henry Bruce 5 and Lieutenant James Monneypenny 6, a translator, previously in Danish-Norwegian service, were sent to Copenhagen where they were taken in by the British Ambassador to the court of Christian IV, Sir Robert Anstruther 7, who returned them home after a summary interrogation. Ensign John Bowie 8 was released on 31st December 1612.

There were certainly many survivors, and there is tradition of the local “Skotte” (Scots) farms being cleared by one such survivor. We have recently learned of a survivor who escaped from the Akershus Fortress and made his way to Sweden, where his descendants still live. Unquestionably, in Gudbrandsdalen today, the local costume “bunad” incorporates a Tartan that is reminiscent of the Red Sinclair.

Rondastakken2.gif

http://www.laird.org...way/Kringen.htm

I'm glad to have learned a little more about some history that I never knew of this part of the world.

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A letter stateing that the answer to the ultimate question and the secret of eveything is....................42

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