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nuckin_futz

Iranian girls beat up Iran cleric over dress code.

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By continuing to dress how they want. "I don't like what you're saying, so I'm going to beat you" is the wrong mentality to have, even when you're in the right.

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They actually have changed a long time ago. If you go to Iran, almost all the girls don't have hijab indoors and don't have any hair coverings and some even show cleavage with a V-neck shirt. Outdoors, girls don't even cover their hair completely and wear really tight clothing. If hijab gets abolished in Iran, I bet the Iranian girls will all go topless in public places (beaches) similar to some parts of Europe.

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Authorities are looking for 2 women dressed in black with hijabs covering their heads.

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By continuing to dress how they want. "I don't like what you're saying, so I'm going to beat you" is the wrong mentality to have, even when you're in the right.

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From a fundamental standpoint I would agree. However simple passive rebellion is (most likely) a privilege these girls don't have, so I'm not sure if I would say that they are in wrong here.

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Women dont wear coverings indoors in the arab world either. They are not required when in the company of "relatives". Its nothing to do with any "change", its always been that way.

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They could have walked away. They could have ignored him. The fact that they were wearing those clothes is in-itself an act of passive rebellion.

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Friday Sep 21, 2012 4:50 AM PT

In the Islamic Republic of Iran, spring is in the air, and the fashion police are out in force.

Spring?

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Friday Sep 21, 2012 4:50 AM PT

In the Islamic Republic of Iran, spring is in the air, and the fashion police are out in force.

Spring?

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Easy for you to say , living in a society where you are not persecuted ,and they live in one where women have been persecuted for over a millenia .

screw these religious freaks and their misogynist views

Iran: As spring rolls in, so do the religious, dress-code police

Friday Sep 21, 2012 4:50 AM PT

In the Islamic Republic of Iran, spring is in the air, and the fashion police are out in force.

No, not self-styled critics of celebrities’ wardrobes who offer catty comments in magazines or on style-and-fashion Web sites, but rather real law-enforcement officials whose job is to make sure Iranians are following the religious dress code their country’s authoritative, senior Muslim clerics have imposed on contemporary society.

What’s in? For women, at least, the more body coverage, the better. That means a practical, head-to-toe, home-to-office-to-night-out robe that shows off very little skin. Revealing only the face and the hands is considered acceptable.

What’s out? Tight coats, or showing too much hair or too much ankle. Too-tall heels definitely have to go…

Yalda Moaiery/REA/Le Figaro.fr

Photos from France’s Le Figaro: An Iranian police official (in black robe, right) apprehends two women who broke the government-enforced, Islamic dress code.

Le Figaro reports: “As with every year, as the lovely days [of spring arrive], Iranian authorities launch a campaign against women who do not vigorously respect to the letter the Islamic dress code.” The French daily offers a photo portfolio showing a female, Iranian dress-code monitor (in full, traditional black robe) at work, apprehending two inappropriately clad women.

The latest crackdown on dress-code violations, which also calls for men to don conservative threads, got started in earnest last weekend. However, this year, angry parents of some of the women who have been apprehended have been “unafraid of making their feelings clear to the police.” Notes Agence France Presse: “Even the overall head of the judiciary, Ayatollah Mahmoud Hashemi Shahroudi, who is appointed by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, urged police against heavy-handed actions…. ‘Hauling women and young people to the police station will have no use except to cause damage to society,’ the reformist Etemad Melli newspaper quoted Shahroudi as telling a meeting of local governors. ‘Tough measures on social problems will backfire and have counter-productive effects,’ he warned.” (AFP in the Gulf Times, Qatar; see also Le Figaro)

A separate AFP news report notes that the Iranian authorities’ dress-code compliance campaign “is more aimed at encouragement and Islamic guidance than coercion, with arrest a last resort if women show a reluctance to change their ways.” An Iranian policeman told the French news service’s reporter: “When we stop a vehicle [carrying an inappropriately dressed woman], we politely tell them to correct their hijab. If our advice is carried out, then we leave it at that….If not, and the female passenger or driver shouts back, then we will ask her for her car’s document, and we will stop her car and take her case to the police station.” (AFP in the Daily Times, Pakistan)

AP

Even the overall head of Iran’s judiciary, Ayatollah Mahmoud Hashemi Shahroudi, has suggested that the dress-code drive should not be too heavy-handed

Writing in Etemad Melli, columnist Masih Alinejad put the current dress-code compliance campaign on Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad‘s desk. He wrote: “Mr. President, I wonder if what the police, supervised by your interior ministry, are doing to women stems from a misunderstanding?…Or have people’s major problems of injustice and poverty been resolved?”

Looking back to Ahmadinejad’s 2005 presidential-election campaign, columnist Alinejad reminded readers that the politician had asked Iranians to consider “whether the problem ‘in our country was two strands of women’s hair or fighting poverty, creating jobs and implementing justice?’”

Agence France Presse notes that Iran’s unemployment rate is now running at around 11 percent, and that two-thirds of the country’s population of 70 million is younger than 30 years old. Presumably, as the weather turns warm, some of those young Iranians would like to go out dressed in T-shirts, shorts – or stiletto heels?

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Last I checked, the guy wasn't trying to arrest them. He was just telling them they were doing something wrong due to his own (albeit stupid) moral convictions.

It's no different than a vegetarian telling you you're wrong to eat meat.

If I were standing on the street corner with a friend, and some super evangelical christian came up to me and started accosting us for wearing multiple fiber clothing, or having a tattoo or anything like that, would we have the right to beat him to the point where he required hospitalization? I'm an Atheist, and up until quite recently Atheists were oppressed all around the world, and still are in some parts. Does that give me the right to respond with violence to anyone who imposes their religion on me, even peacefully?

Wow. That's frightening. "Hey you're not following my religion's code." "Welp, I guess I better kill you."

That will turn out well.

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While I agree that the violence used against this man was harsh given the culture, I don't think we can ever realise the amount of anger and frustration these women must feel from a lifetime of oppression. I'm going to give them a pass on this one.

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