Jump to content

Welcome to canucks.com Vancouver Canucks homepage

Photo

RIP Amanda Todd


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
448 replies to this topic

#421 Red Light Racicot

Red Light Racicot

    Canucks Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,599 posts
  • Joined: 28-June 10

Posted 17 October 2012 - 08:52 PM

...and then explain to me why you think taking something from everyone else to solve a problem of yours isn't selfish?


Then this argument is over and probably never should've started in the first place?


Why would you differentiate between two completely different cases of suicide? I know virtually nothing about the suicide of Rick Rypien and thus I don't feel comfortable relating Amanda's suicide to his. If you think what I say applies to him, than feel free to apply my argument's logic to that case, otherwise don't. However I will not be the one to apply my argument to his case because I know nothing of it. Further, I won't argue whether my comments do or don't apply to his case, that is up to you to decide.


Yes, and it argues that suicide is selfish because of that.


Yes, but one thing you need to realize is that suicide victims generally dont think its a selfish decision. You have to try and see it from their point of view.

Once I started learning about the problem, I reallized that people like you and me dont really have much of a way to understand what its like. Depression is a devastating problem and many people dont understand how it really feels, what it means to the sufferer, and the impact it can have.

Depression can alter your thinking to the point where the victim convinces him/herself that the world would be better off without them, and this includes their families. These people dont actually want to die, they are just desperate for their torment to end. Our minds are very powerful and depression overrides rational thought.

This is what I mean when I say this is something we cant imagine going through.

#422 TheClumsyGoalie

TheClumsyGoalie

    K-Wing Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Joined: 31-August 11

Posted 17 October 2012 - 10:50 PM

I thought the video had a few good points but was mostly just a moronic rant. I'm pretty sure I already addressed why I thought so a few pages back.

And I don't know which rules, I guess language and perhaps just being disrespectful.


Hmm, I respectfully disagree with your opinion (and anybody else who things so) on it being moronic. I don't think that there is anything moronic about him bringing up this (in my opinion) major issue, the issue being how people don't actually care as much as they act like they do about these kinds of things. How many of us are really going to go and do something which will help bring an end to bullying? Even if its something seemingly insignificant. Probably a very, very small percentage. And don't people think that would make Amanda sad? What do people think she would rather have her videos viral success result in, a popular facebook page or real actual change?

In my opinion, viral videos like these are just another way for people to feed their own ego, because they can go like a facebook page, post a heartfelt twitter update, or be the first one to talk about it at school or work. They can then pat themselves on the back for being such an empathetic kind-hearted human being, and proudly scorn anybody who has a different opinion on the matter. Of course not all people are like this, but I believe that they are the minority, and a very small minority at that.

Even if anybody found the video to be obnoxious or insensitive (that is his style anyways), he brings up good points which reveals our hypocrisy.

#423 Nevlach

Nevlach

    Canucks Franchise Player

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,022 posts
  • Joined: 04-April 05

Posted 17 October 2012 - 11:30 PM

Hmm, I respectfully disagree with your opinion (and anybody else who things so) on it being moronic. I don't think that there is anything moronic about him bringing up this (in my opinion) major issue, the issue being how people don't actually care as much as they act like they do about these kinds of things. How many of us are really going to go and do something which will help bring an end to bullying? Even if its something seemingly insignificant. Probably a very, very small percentage. And don't people think that would make Amanda sad? What do people think she would rather have her videos viral success result in, a popular facebook page or real actual change?

In my opinion, viral videos like these are just another way for people to feed their own ego, because they can go like a facebook page, post a heartfelt twitter update, or be the first one to talk about it at school or work. They can then pat themselves on the back for being such an empathetic kind-hearted human being, and proudly scorn anybody who has a different opinion on the matter. Of course not all people are like this, but I believe that they are the minority, and a very small minority at that.

Even if anybody found the video to be obnoxious or insensitive (that is his style anyways), he brings up good points which reveals our hypocrisy.

Firstly I thought you worded your disagreement very respectfully TCG - always good to share ideas without trying to belittle a differing view.

That said (and perhaps this sounded harsh) I thought his video was moronic because what is he trying to accomplish? He just assumes that the majority of people don't actually care? How would he know? How would he know if spreading her story is going to be effective long term in combatting cyber-bullying? To me he just seems to be throwing out accusations and (the kicker imo) he's not even doing anything to be part of the solution. He's criticizing people for not doing anything while he himself is not doing anything.

I think the Amanda Todd story gave people a feeling of emotional connection. It's not why should we care about Amanda and not about anyone else; it's we should care about how bad the effects of cyber-bullying can be and here is a reason why.

Not everyone has the time, ability, or right circumstances to actively go out each day and combat bullying but simply by reposting her story people are at the very least raising awareness to how serious the problem can be. Amanda's story helps people understand.

The Amazing Atheist accusing everyone of being hypocrites without actually being a solution himself to me just seemed moronic. I felt like he was just trying to be a "pot-stirrer" and ruffle peoples feathers.
Posted Image
Posted Image

#424 JeremyW

JeremyW

    K-Wing Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Joined: 04-August 12

Posted 17 October 2012 - 11:53 PM

Yes, but one thing you need to realize is that suicide victims generally dont think its a selfish decision. You have to try and see it from their point of view.

Once I started learning about the problem, I reallized that people like you and me dont really have much of a way to understand what its like. Depression is a devastating problem and many people dont understand how it really feels, what it means to the sufferer, and the impact it can have.

Depression can alter your thinking to the point where the victim convinces him/herself that the world would be better off without them, and this includes their families. These people dont actually want to die, they are just desperate for their torment to end. Our minds are very powerful and depression overrides rational thought.

This is what I mean when I say this is something we cant imagine going through.

I agree with most of what you've said there. Like I said, I do sympathize for Amanda as she was young, dramatic and depressed. I wouldn't have expected her (or most suicide victims) to realize just how selfish it was to do what they did.

Edited by JeremyW, 17 October 2012 - 11:53 PM.


#425 AriGold

AriGold

    Hairy Old

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,505 posts
  • Joined: 09-June 12

Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:59 AM

After reading more about Amanda Todd and the alleged hacker i started poking around on the internet.

People are messed up, why when i google her name do bad pictures of her come up ? Cant these website be stopped from posting these things ?

                                                 Hockey-Canada-Logo__2__large.png


#426 JeremyW

JeremyW

    K-Wing Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 61 posts
  • Joined: 04-August 12

Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:06 AM

After reading more about Amanda Todd and the alleged hacker i started poking around on the internet.

People are messed up, why when i google her name do bad pictures of her come up ? Cant these website be stopped from posting these things ?


Nope. The internet is a protocol, no one has ownership over it. The solution to this problem is to encourage people to speak & share their problems with people they trust. You cannot ever stop cyber-bullying.

#427 AriGold

AriGold

    Hairy Old

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,505 posts
  • Joined: 09-June 12

Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:13 AM

Nope. The internet is a protocol, no one has ownership over it. The solution to this problem is to encourage people to speak & share their problems with people they trust. You cannot ever stop cyber-bullying.

Sorry I mean when i was googling her name etc i stumbled upon her pictures that started this whole tragedy.. I wonder how the hell those can be posted on website off a google search..

                                                 Hockey-Canada-Logo__2__large.png


#428 لني

لني

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,310 posts
  • Joined: 14-July 08

Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:25 AM

After reading more about Amanda Todd and the alleged hacker i started poking around on the internet.

People are messed up, why when i google her name do bad pictures of her come up ? Cant these website be stopped from posting these things ?


Not to mention all the messed up stuff being posted on FB and the net about the alleged stalker/perp.

Threats to him. Mentioning how he should die. How he should kill himself. Etc

This has only.shown how messed up people really are when given anonymity.
Sent from my iPhone Canucks App

It is not my intent to get in circular arguments with anybody. The reason i have avoided saying anything specific is because i know you or someone else will attempt to find an alternate explanation to my points which i intern will have to defend. I see no point in getting involved with the circular argument that is already well under way in this thread. I simply intended to voice my opinion on the subject. In the end either you accept the possibility of corruption and conspiracy or you don't.

Also i find your comments to be very childish. Does taking what i say out of context, paraphrasing and misquoting it make you feel good about yourself? Grow up.


Logic at its finest.

#429 Jai604

Jai604

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,039 posts
  • Joined: 14-October 10

Posted 18 October 2012 - 07:13 AM

Yes, but one thing you need to realize is that suicide victims generally dont think its a selfish decision. You have to try and see it from their point of view.

Once I started learning about the problem, I reallized that people like you and me dont really have much of a way to understand what its like. Depression is a devastating problem and many people dont understand how it really feels, what it means to the sufferer, and the impact it can have.

Depression can alter your thinking to the point where the victim convinces him/herself that the world would be better off without them, and this includes their families. These people dont actually want to die, they are just desperate for their torment to end. Our minds are very powerful and depression overrides rational thought.

This is what I mean when I say this is something we cant imagine going through.


This is exactly what I've been saying all along. It's just not possible for someone who hasn't experienced it to understand. As you said, it's irrational to the rest of the people who don't suffer from depression, and it won't make any sense.

And as a result, it's hard to entirely blame those who haven't been through it for not understanding. However, one can be blamed for not trying to understand.

It is a real problem, a devastating problem, that clearly not only affects the person who is depressed. Depression hurts everybody around the person suffering from it too. It can tear relationships and families and friendships apart easily, because people just don't understand it.


The Amazing Atheist's video is garbage. He is guilty of the exact same thing that those he accuses are. He accuses people of just writing heartfelt messages, or just posting things on social media and not actually caring. And what of him? What does his video accomplish? Nothing at all.

And while most people reading about the story and posting about it on social media sites will most likely do nothing, awareness is never a bad thing, at the very least. If just a handful of people, because of this story, actually do something and contribute to the solution I'd say it was a success.

RIP LB RR PD


#430 Hockey!?

Hockey!?

    Comets Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 389 posts
  • Joined: 13-February 10

Posted 18 October 2012 - 09:16 AM

More on Maxson:

http://hypervocal.co...-victim-peyton/

And according to Anonymous (From their FB Page):

Just found something linking Viper2323 and Kody1206. Can't post the photo because it has child porn in the thread.



These men, (whom I'd much rather refer to as abominations), run in the same social circle. The idea that Kody was protecting Amanda is laughable. If anything, it's a lame excuse at covering his own ass. Disgusting.

Edited by Hockey!?, 18 October 2012 - 09:22 AM.

Posted Image

Posted Image


#431 TheClumsyGoalie

TheClumsyGoalie

    K-Wing Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Joined: 31-August 11

Posted 18 October 2012 - 11:48 AM

Firstly I thought you worded your disagreement very respectfully TCG - always good to share ideas without trying to belittle a differing view.

That said (and perhaps this sounded harsh) I thought his video was moronic because what is he trying to accomplish? He just assumes that the majority of people don't actually care? How would he know? How would he know if spreading her story is going to be effective long term in combatting cyber-bullying? To me he just seems to be throwing out accusations and (the kicker imo) he's not even doing anything to be part of the solution. He's criticizing people for not doing anything while he himself is not doing anything.

I think the Amanda Todd story gave people a feeling of emotional connection. It's not why should we care about Amanda and not about anyone else; it's we should care about how bad the effects of cyber-bullying can be and here is a reason why.

Not everyone has the time, ability, or right circumstances to actively go out each day and combat bullying but simply by reposting her story people are at the very least raising awareness to how serious the problem can be. Amanda's story helps people understand.

The Amazing Atheist accusing everyone of being hypocrites without actually being a solution himself to me just seemed moronic. I felt like he was just trying to be a "pot-stirrer" and ruffle peoples feathers.


Yeah, you're probably right about him just trying to stir the pot, because he is known for doing that as well. And you're also probably right about how he himself isn't really contributing to the solution to the problem, considering he would never make a video like that one unless the topic wasn't what everybody was talking about. So yeah, all things considered, he is being just as much of a slactivist as the rest of us.

Although slactivists most of us are, and that is the bottom line. Whether that is a good or bad thing is anybodys opinion. I think that, while it definitely does raise awareness, there is something wrong about just clicking a button for our own personal satisfaction, rather than ultimately trying to bring an end to the problem at hand. Although it is obviously better than doing nothing, it just feels like people are missing the point. I could be wrong, I hope I am, but at the end of the day I think that this ordeal will just amount to a very popular facebook page. The bullys will continue to bully, and unless a strong effort is put into place to end that there won't be a significant change.

Maybe once these suicide videos start piling up (which they actually have been, there are hundreds of videos like these on youtube), and awareness of them is raised so that they are clogging the headlines, actions will be taken place to end bullying. So sure, raising awareness will most likely end up solving the problem, but it will be long before then, and thousands of teenagers will die before the issue becomes serious enough to spend time and money solving the problem. If their deaths are worth it to end bullying, however, that is anybodys opinion. That is where I think there is the moral dilemma.

Edited by TheClumsyGoalie, 18 October 2012 - 11:51 AM.


#432 Gustavo Fring

Gustavo Fring

    Canucks Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,517 posts
  • Joined: 02-July 11

Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:28 PM

I am really sad and angry... She made a mistake but nobody deserves what she went through. It bothers me that her video was posted a month before she commited suicide and no one reached out to her. Rest in peace Amanda Todd and I'm sorry you had to endure our sick society, a society where we only listen after you've died.
Posted Image

#433 stawns

stawns

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,199 posts
  • Joined: 10-August 03

Posted 18 October 2012 - 12:29 PM

Yeah, you're probably right about him just trying to stir the pot, because he is known for doing that as well. And you're also probably right about how he himself isn't really contributing to the solution to the problem, considering he would never make a video like that one unless the topic wasn't what everybody was talking about. So yeah, all things considered, he is being just as much of a slactivist as the rest of us.

Although slactivists most of us are, and that is the bottom line. Whether that is a good or bad thing is anybodys opinion. I think that, while it definitely does raise awareness, there is something wrong about just clicking a button for our own personal satisfaction, rather than ultimately trying to bring an end to the problem at hand. Although it is obviously better than doing nothing, it just feels like people are missing the point. I could be wrong, I hope I am, but at the end of the day I think that this ordeal will just amount to a very popular facebook page. The bullys will continue to bully, and unless a strong effort is put into place to end that there won't be a significant change.

Maybe once these suicide videos start piling up (which they actually have been, there are hundreds of videos like these on youtube), and awareness of them is raised so that they are clogging the headlines, actions will be taken place to end bullying. So sure, raising awareness will most likely end up solving the problem, but it will be long before then, and thousands of teenagers will die before the issue becomes serious enough to spend time and money solving the problem. If their deaths are worth it to end bullying, however, that is anybodys opinion. That is where I think there is the moral dilemma.


You will never end bullying, it's human nature........sorry. Not to say we shouldn't try, but there needs to be more focus oin empowering victims and helping them recover.

#434 TheClumsyGoalie

TheClumsyGoalie

    K-Wing Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Joined: 31-August 11

Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:29 PM

You will never end bullying, it's human nature........sorry. Not to say we shouldn't try, but there needs to be more focus oin empowering victims and helping them recover.


You're right, its impossible to completely put a stop to bullying. With enough determination however we can eliminate a great deal of it, and that will be well worth the cost. I also think that there are enough resources to both downsize bullying and support victims, we don't need to take energy going into one problem and use it for another when there is enough to help both sides.

Edited by TheClumsyGoalie, 18 October 2012 - 01:31 PM.


#435 GLASSJAW

GLASSJAW

    LEGENDARY POSER

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,283 posts
  • Joined: 21-February 04

Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:30 PM

I am really sad and angry... She made a mistake but nobody deserves what she went through. It bothers me that her video was posted a month before she commited suicide and no one reached out to her. Rest in peace Amanda Todd and I'm sorry you had to endure our sick society, a society where we only listen after you've died.


Her video was nothing special, though. It's kind of like a needle in a pile of needles. There is a 'trend' on youtube (social media sites, etc) where people share their stories in that exact same format (cards, music, etc.).

The good thing for you, since you're so outraged at the lack of 'outreach' even after her video posted, is that you can do a very simple search into youtube and reach out to these people yourself. Many of the videos were posted a year ago, some months ago, even more will be posted now that Todd's achieved such attention.

I commend you for your outrage, and I'll further commend you for your outreach.

output_Pdq_B7_F.gif
 
i'm not alone; i'll never be
 


#436 J.R.

J.R.

    Rainbow Butt Monkey

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,028 posts
  • Joined: 04-July 08

Posted 18 October 2012 - 02:59 PM

http://ca.news.yahoo...-173710699.html

RCMP's Operation Snapshot leads to major child porn bust, 30 arrests made


Does this have anything to do with this case or just a happy coincidence?
"Science is like an inoculation against charlatans who would have you believe whatever it is they tell you."
- Neil deGrasse Tyson

Posted ImagePosted Image

#437 Kumquats

Kumquats

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,451 posts
  • Joined: 05-July 08

Posted 18 October 2012 - 10:14 PM

A friend of mine made this video as a tribute to her with music from his band:

https://www.youtube....h?v=eLsJTtRO4KA

Edited by DRCN SLYR, 18 October 2012 - 10:16 PM.


#438 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 19 October 2012 - 01:40 PM

In London Ontario, eight alleged female bullies have been arrested and charged with criminal harassment. They may also face expulsion from school.

Eight high school students have been arrested and charged with criminal harassment following a police investigation into a bullying case at a school in southwestern Ontario.

Police in London, Ont., said their probe revealed that a student at London South Collegiate Institute had been the target of physical, emotional and cyber bullying.

The accused students — all female — have been released from police custody on a promise to appear in court. Police say additional charges may be laid.

An official with the Thames Valley District School Board said the eight suspects were suspended earlier this week, and face possible expulsion when the school completes its own investigation into the allegations.

Bill Tucker, the board's director of education, said the school and police, were made aware of the allegations a week ago after receiving more than half dozen tips from students, staff and community members.


Many of the tips had come in anonymously from the school's web portal.


Tucker said as a result, the school immediately took swift action to "monitor" the safety of the alleged victim.

On Friday, the school held an assembly to highlight the "positive results" of reporting bullying cases.

"Bullying is not tolerated. It's not acceptable. There are consequences," said Tucker.

He said that the board is also aware of the need to protect the accused students.

"I am responsible for the safety of all students," said Tucker.

The arrests came as several schools and groups prepared to pay tribute to bullying victims, including a British Columbia teen who committed suicide after enduring years of Internet sexual exploitation and torment by her peers.

Amanda Todd, who was from Port Coquitlam, B.C., took her own life last week, the latest in a series of high-profile bullying incidents that have come to tragic conclusions.

Her story — laid out in a YouTube video posted online a month before her death — captured worldwide attention and revived debate over how to prevent bullying and deal with those who commit the abuse.

On Monday, a New Democrat member of Parliament, introduced a motion calling for the creation of a House of Commons committee to develop a national bullying prevention strategy that would examine the prevalence and impact of bullying and look for ways to prevent it.

Several provinces have also taken steps to tackle the issue.

Ontario passed anti-bullying legislation in June, a few months after a 13-year-old boy was acquitted of robbing and assaulting 11-year-old Mitchell Wilson in a bullying case that garnered widespread attention.

Wilson, who suffered from muscular dystrophy, killed himself last September.

The legislation was introduced in the wake of another high-profile case, the death last year of 15-year-old Jamie Hubley, a boy who was targeted as an openly gay student at his Ottawa school.

Recent federal studies indicate that one in five children or youth have reported being victimized by bullies.
http://news.ca.msn.c...lying-suspended


Edited by Wetcoaster, 19 October 2012 - 01:41 PM.

To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#439 debluvscanucks

debluvscanucks

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,325 posts
  • Joined: 19-February 08

Posted 19 October 2012 - 01:59 PM

You will never end bullying, it's human nature........sorry. Not to say we shouldn't try, but there needs to be more focus oin empowering victims and helping them recover.


If bullies face consequences, it won't eliminate it but it certainly will be a deterrent to some.

My son's Principal said the exact same thing but, in the heat of the moment, that's ineffective. Kids sometimes need immediate intervention, not to work on themselves. Sure, there are things that can help a kid avoid being targeted as weak/vulnerable and I agree that you can empower victims and teach them to stand up for themselves. But sometimes a kid's outnumbered 8-1 and the stalkers are relentless, so all the empowerment in the world isn't going to make a difference at that point. And to let bullies off the hook with a "human nature" excuse is BS....bullies make choices in their actions. Often, they themselves have self esteem issues and a need to prove themselves - so that can also be worked on. To not focus on their end of things is letting them off the hook.

We don't tolerate bullies in the workplace, on the road as road ragers, etc. so why should schools or the internet be any different?

If "human nature" means you commit a crime, there are consequences to face in that. So bullies should definitely be factored into the equation in trying to fix this problem. I know you said "not to say we shouldn't try" - but I hate when people put the responsibility on the victims...they're just living their lives. The bullies have to have the spotlight on them, as the punks that they are, so that their behavior is exposed and they answer for it.

Posted Image


#440 skolozsy2

skolozsy2

    Canucks Prospect

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,290 posts
  • Joined: 13-October 09

Posted 19 October 2012 - 02:46 PM

You will never end bullying, it's human nature........sorry. Not to say we shouldn't try, but there needs to be more focus oin empowering victims and helping them recover.

Dont disagree with you, the world will never be free of bullying unfortunetly. But the goal/wishes of most people in this thread, i assume, is to make it less prevalent in the world through awareness.

Racism, sexism, and homophobia was pretty much human nature as well for mankind. And while those things all still exist today....they are not nearly as prevalent as they were a generation ago. Our society as a whole has moved forward in reducing that behavior through awareness and education and making nearly taboo.

I hope making people aware of the bullying issue will have the same effect.

#441 Red Light Racicot

Red Light Racicot

    Canucks Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,599 posts
  • Joined: 28-June 10

Posted 19 October 2012 - 03:44 PM

You will never end bullying, it's human nature........sorry. Not to say we shouldn't try, but there needs to be more focus oin empowering victims and helping them recover.


Thats like saying you cant stop theft or abuse.

It isnt necessarily a part of human nature because a lot of people dont do it. Its not like theres an uncontrollable urge to do these things as far as I know.

Nothing wrong with trying to prevent it whenever and wherever possible.

Edited by Red Light Racicot, 19 October 2012 - 03:48 PM.


#442 Red Light Racicot

Red Light Racicot

    Canucks Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,599 posts
  • Joined: 28-June 10

Posted 19 October 2012 - 04:05 PM

The Amazing Atheist's video is garbage. He is guilty of the exact same thing that those he accuses are. He accuses people of just writing heartfelt messages, or just posting things on social media and not actually caring. And what of him? What does his video accomplish? Nothing at all.

And while most people reading about the story and posting about it on social media sites will most likely do nothing, awareness is never a bad thing, at the very least. If just a handful of people, because of this story, actually do something and contribute to the solution I'd say it was a success.


Hes got some messed up opinions, and he just doesnt seem to get it.

Why did Rodney King get so much publicity? Terry Fox? Why do any of these cases get attention? Its the media, and its a very important thing that creates actual change. This is not about ignoring these other people who share similar problems, it helps to shed light on their problems.

His take on the subject is very difficult for me to understand, but this is a pretty cynical guy (at least his pensona) and he seems to have problems understanding things like empathy.

#443 Gally

Gally

    KJ's Butler

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,641 posts
  • Joined: 18-March 12

Posted 19 October 2012 - 09:50 PM

Personally I think we need to try to find out what's wrong with the bullies and fix that first which I would think would be more productive than constantly trying to fix the victim and have the bullies continue what thy are doing, I'm not saying don't worry about he victims, but if we figured out why the bullies are doing what they are doing and try and fix that it might prevent the bullying. Ultimately, I think the kids need to stop laughing with the bullies and just have them ignore them. Bullies feed off the laughter they get and if they don't have any the bullying would stop.

Edited by Gally, 19 October 2012 - 09:51 PM.

Posted Image

Credit to -Vintage Canuck-


 

my mom wouldn't let me touch the laptop because I have to stand after I eat....kinda stupid

 


#444 Jai604

Jai604

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,039 posts
  • Joined: 14-October 10

Posted 20 October 2012 - 09:12 AM

Hes got some messed up opinions, and he just doesnt seem to get it.

Why did Rodney King get so much publicity? Terry Fox? Why do any of these cases get attention? Its the media, and its a very important thing that creates actual change. This is not about ignoring these other people who share similar problems, it helps to shed light on their problems.

His take on the subject is very difficult for me to understand, but this is a pretty cynical guy (at least his pensona) and he seems to have problems understanding things like empathy.


I agree. He's just a cynic, and contributes nothing to the discourse either.


I agree, in that sometimes we don't know why certain stories become famous or why some people become celebrities. There is a certain element of chance to it.

I think the thing that is important for some people to understand is that just because one person's story gets told, it doesn't discredit or mean that other similar stories or people are less important. Amanda's story went viral for whatever reason, but people arguing "why should we care? She's one in thousands" are just plain wrong. Just because we care about this particular case doesn't mean the other cases are not important. In fact, I would say it's completely the opposite. I completely agree with you in saying that stories like Amanda's should not be ignored because she's "just one girl out of many". If anything, her story can help shed more light on the subject and hopefully in some way spark some changes that can save a child's life.

That's what's important. Eliciting change and putting measures and programs in place that can help us save the lives of our children. If out of all of this hoopla we as a society manage to save even one troubled teenager's life, I'd say it was worth it.

RIP LB RR PD


#445 -Vintage Canuck-

-Vintage Canuck-

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 75,007 posts
  • Joined: 24-May 10

Posted 20 October 2012 - 12:13 PM

White Rock mom angry that school punished son for fighting back against bully:

When it comes to bullying, Lara Fominoff has always preached the same message to her young son: Never bully or be mean to the other kids. And never start a fight. But if someone starts a fight with you, you have the right to defend yourself.


It was this right that Fominoff says her six-year-old son exercised last week when he was confronted by a bully in the schoolyard of White Rock Elementary. After words failed, she says her son responded to the physical aggression he faced by striking back.


His decision to do so earned him a punishment equal to the other boy’s, something that has ignited a local debate over one’s right to self-defend when confronted by bullying versus the local school district’s zero tolerance policy on violence.


Doug Strachan, communications manager for the Surrey School District, which covers White Rock schools, says violence of any sort is unacceptable within district schools. That includes students striking back against someone who has hit them.


“If someone was pushed or even hit, that individual can get up and report that or they can kick and hit back,” says Strachan. “And we are saying they should be reporting it and not escalating it.”


But Fominoff can’t understand why her son received equal punishment to his tormentor, who was three years her son’s senior, when he didn’t initiate the confrontation and he had only been trying to defend himself.


She disagrees with the district’s blanket policy on violence because it colours the complicated debate of bullying black and white. Within such a framework, a student who defends themselves from a bully’s attack is punished rather than supported.


“I’m never going to punish my son for defending himself in a fight,” Fominoff says. “I’m not say that every time someone does that [gets physical] that you should hit back. But if someone is hurting you, you have a choice to do a number of things. And fighting back is one.”


It’s a position likely shared by many parents at a time of intense public debate on bullying sparked by the recent suicide of 15-year-old Amanda Todd, the Port Coquitlam girl who killed herself after enduring years of online and face to face bullying.


Fominoff said she was initially accepting of her son’s punishment — he was reprimanded by the school’s principal and made to apologize — but later changed her mind when she learned the full story and the extent of her son’s injuries (swollen knee, limping).


She was told during a later meeting with school district officials that the policy on violence was not going to change. But they did tell her they would look into the issue of schoolyard supervision, another point Fominoff took issue with.


While she described the meeting as productive, she maintains her view that the district’s policy is wrong.


“He got thrown to the ground, how do you walk away from that?” she says. “It not right [for the policy] to be applied without discretion. They can’t just have a blanket policy and apply it everywhere.”


http://www.theprovin..._medium=twitter

307mg00.jpg


#446 Primus099

Primus099

    Canucks Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,009 posts
  • Joined: 17-October 12

Posted 20 October 2012 - 06:54 PM

This whole thing is just a mess now. From her loser friends using her name to be popular on facebook and youtube, to the lynch mob patrolling the internet for evil doers

#447 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:19 PM

On Sunday November 18 a memorial and tribute is planned in the memory of Amanda Todd just 2 days after what would have been her 16th birthday.


On Friday, Amanda Todd would have turned 16. But as people around the world have come to know, the Port Coquitlam teen never lived to see that day.


Instead, her family and friends will pay tribute to her on Sunday (Nov. 18) through a celebration of life and happy birthday memorial at the Red Robinson Show Theatre in Coquitlam.


Todd, who was a Grade 10 student at Coquitlam Alternate Basic Education (CABE) Secondary in Coquitlam, committed suicide on Oct. 10, a month after posting a YouTube video about her experiences battling bullies over an incident that occurred a few years ago.


Her story caught the world's attention, bringing a renewed focus on the issue of bullying in the province.


Sunday's memorial is meant as an opportunity for friends, family and the public to pay tribute to the teen.


Due to the limited number of seats, attendees are asked to RSVP to www.xoxoent.com/ amandarsvp.


The doors are set to open at 12: 30 p.m., with the memorial running from 1: 30 to 3: 30 p.m.


People are also being asked to bring an unwrapped toy, which will be donated to the SHARE Family & Community Services Society for Christmas.


The family has also established the Amanda Todd Legacy.


The initiative is intended to raise money for anti-bullying education and for support programs to help young people with mental health problems and educational initiatives. Donations can be made online to the Vancouver Foundation or any RBC Canada branch under Amanda Todd's Trust Fund.

http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Amanda+Todd+tribute+planned+Sunday/7547941/story.html#ixzz2CEKtEqPv
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#448 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:23 PM

The BC government has announced a new website that will allow B.C. students to make anonymous reports about bullying by peers or by adults.


Efforts to stop bullying require a culture change in schools and communities, Premier Christy Clark told an anti-bullying conference Tuesday.


“Kids are swimming in a culture of mean all the time and we have to address that,” she said during the Vancouver forum, organized after the suicide last month of Port Coquitlam teenager Amanda Todd. The meeting opened with a government announcement of a new website that will allow B.C. students to make anonymous reports about bullying by peers or by adults.


Their reports will trigger an alert to a safe school coordinator, who will determine the best course of action and contact the police, if necessary, the forum was told. Every school district in the province has a safe-school coordinator, and they will also be responsible for identifying trends and hot spots in schools.


Bullying can no longer be dismissed as simply a part of growing up, Clark said. “Bullying is not a rite of passage; bullying does not build character for children.”


The conference, which brought together educators, students and experts, was organized as part of the province’s Erase Bullying strategy, announced in June. Clark said it was also in response to the suicide of 15-year-old Amanda, who was sexually exploited online and then relentlessly bullied by her peers.


“We lost Amanda and it was a tragedy,” Clark told reporters. “But we should learn from that. She would want that from us.”


Carol Todd, Amanda’s mother, told The Vancouver Sun she had hoped to attend the conference but wasn’t invited. She said she asked if she could attend, but the Education Ministry turned her down, saying her presence might upset young people who would be attending the all-day event and discussing their experiences with bullies.


“I didn’t want to speak, I just wanted to listen,” she said. No one from the ministry was immediately available for an interview Tuesday.


Clark said adults have to change the culture of public schools so that students feel safe to report bullying and to intervene while it’s happening. “The commitment coming out of today’s meeting is to build on our momentum and work together to build a culture of kindness, caring and respect where no child has to wake up in the morning and go to school worrying about what will happen to them that day,” she said in a release.


The Erase Bullying program includes stronger codes of conduct for schools and a five-year training program that will eventually see 15,000 educators learn about creating inclusive schools and how to conduct threat assessments in their buildings.


One of the lead trainers, Theresa Campbell, said the training will dispel the myth that any abusive behaviour should be called bullying.


Slamming a student’s head against the wall of the school? That’s assault, said Campbell. Threatening text messages? There’s a law against that, too. Relentless cyberbullying? Campbell called that “social assassination.”


“There has been a blatant under-reaction to behaviours in our schools because everything has been lumped into bullying,” she told the conference.


“We have to be more mindful and start calling these behaviours what they are.”


Independent schools have been invited to use the ERASE Bullying strategy but are not compelled to do so.


Jay Luty, a recent high school graduate who told the conference about the years he spent ostracized and bullied by his peers, called on teachers and parents to make sure children know they can come forward.


Luty said he spent much of his time in high school feeling alone and unable to connect with his peers. When he wasn’t spending lunch hours hiding from other students in the library, he was forced to endure teasing, amplifying his social anxiety.


He spiralled into suicidal thoughts, he recalled, which didn’t abate until he finally worked up the courage to tell his parents what was happening.


“I told them I was having thoughts of suicide and I detailed everything that was bothering me, every insecurity that was eating me,” he said.


“Once I stated all my problems out loud to someone who was hearing me out, I felt some of the stress become instantly alleviated .... I realized I didn’t have so much to be worried about.”


Luty said adults need to encourage more students to take that step.


“Show empathy and extend your support to your students, children or friends in need, and encourage them to say what they feel,” he said.


The issue of bullying has gained renewed prominence in B.C. and across the country in the month since Amanda Todd’s suicide.


Several weeks before her death, the 15-year-old posted a video to YouTube in which she flipped through dozens of cards that told her story in short, black sentences.


She said she was in Grade 7 when she was lured by an unidentified male to expose her breasts on a webcam, and a year later someone on Facebook threatened to distribute a photo from the video chat. She said the police later told her someone did, indeed, distribute the photo.


The RCMP continue to investigate her death.


In addition to the debate the case has generated in B.C., justice and public safety ministers from across Canada agreed two weeks ago to create a national working group to discuss the issue of cyberbullying, suggesting the issue could even be addressed by changes to the Criminal Code.

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/unveils+website+report+bullying+month+after+Amanda+Todd/7540654/story.html#ixzz2CELuuriJ
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#449 NucksPatsFan

NucksPatsFan

    Canucks Franchise Player

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,390 posts
  • Joined: 15-July 06

Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:36 PM

^
Its what people on cell phones post so it automatically takes them to the last page of the thread, it means last page

28mmdg5.jpg

Thanks to -Vintage Canuck- for the awesome signature

egpcw0.gif





Canucks.com is the official Web site of The Vancouver Canucks. The Vancouver Canucks and Canucks.com are trademarks of The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership.  NHL and the word mark and image of the Stanley Cup are registered trademarks and the NHL Shield and NHL Conference logos are trademarks of the National Hockey League. All NHL logos and marks and NHL team logos and marks as well as all other proprietary materials depicted herein are the property of the NHL and the respective NHL teams and may not be reproduced without the prior written consent of NHL Enterprises, L.P.  Copyright © 2009 The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership and the National Hockey League.  All Rights Reserved.