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key2thecup

Son calls for end to NHL lockout from dying father's bedside

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Well that's...inappropriate.

Very touching without a doubt but really if his favorite show to watch was Night Court would we care? Don't get me wrong...I loved Bull.

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I mean, I understand the game is important for many people but this is a bit much, no?

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What players could do is host a charity event. This is a very grim and sad situation, but unfortunately businesses can not be run on a whim. The CBA is a very delicate, important item for the employers and employees, and there is very little that can force them to settle quickly. As ideal as it would be to see the NHL return soon, it is very unlikely to happen.

If a large group of players can host a charity event and have it broadcast live on television, that would be terrific.

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I actually understand this but also would NEVER publish the picture to make the point. Never. I feel it's a very personal matter and this doesn't reflect or honour that. The picture really disturbs me.

I have a similar picture of my Mom (but I didn't capture her face, as I didn't feel it was appropriate)....she was in hospice, dying of brain cancer. I knew we didn't have long together and one of our last moments (the story of which I've told here before) was during a "Hockey Day In Canada" Canucks game. My Mom was drifting in/out and I was sitting at her bedside in the dark/curtains drawn with the sound down on her little TV. As I sat with the game muted, I reflected on all the games we'd shared together. It is a bittersweet memory - one which had my Mom "tune back in" momentarily, to comment on the game (and Trevor Linden - of course...her hero). She actually had a moment of clarity where she knew our team and, especially, that Trevor was on the ice. That did seem to offer her some comfort and familiarity in what was an awful time of confusion for her. So I do understand these feelings and the connection between a parent/child and the love of their team. How important that bonding and the memories associated with that are and how, in those final moments, we grasp to hang onto them. I also have a voicemail of Mom celebrating the Lions' Grey Cup win as well, that I treasure.

But anger has no place in this. This person is inviting hostility into what ARE likely some of his last moments with his father and that's his own choosing (and a rather selfish one, as he likely carries those vibes to his Father's bedside with him). He should focus on what's important here and make this a time of peace and tranquility....not uneasiness and tension (which tend to have a way of seeping out and infusing elsewhere). So they can't watch a game?...maybe he should do what I did and sit by his Father's bed telling stories of "remember when...." in recalling their favourite hockey moments. It doesn't mean they have to actually watch a current game....stream one of their favourite games.

Situations are what they are and what we make of them is the only thing within our control. Although I also understand and empathize with the anger that this man is feeling as he watches his Father slip away, an unselfish act would be to push that aside and focus on the positive. To ease through the letting go phase gently, vs exerting energy into fighting circumstances beyond his control.

He has his priorities all messed up as far as I'm concerned...he will never get this time back so he should be focusing his attention on making his father comfortable and that his dignity is protected. Posting pictures isn't really necessary or in line with that.

I'm with EOTM on this one...inappropriate. And rather exploitive in nature to me.

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I actually feel sick to my stomach seeing that picture, it is a memory I do not need. Seeing someone using a sickness as a media forum absolutely pisses me off to no extent.

Like Deb mentioned talking about old games, he could even youtube some of their favorite games, or better yet just be there for him.

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For some people, relationships between father and son can be tenuous. And if hockey's the one thing that brings these two together, who are we to judge?

The point of this guy's video was not to use his dad's illness as a bargaining chip, but rather to remind people, that for some people, hockey is more than just a game. And there are more important things in life than money.

It may be taken the wrong way, but his message is a good one.

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It's sad that his father has been diagnosed with a terminal illness, and I'm sure the son means well...but this is plain wrong. Exploiting your fathers illness through the media in order to get a game back is in my opinion nothing but a cry for attention. The NHL is unfortunately not going to pay much attention, if any, to the situation and rightfully so. The NHL is far bigger than one man. As heartless as I sound in saying it, its reality.

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I hate this emotional BS for the reasons stated above. A simple "bring hockey back" would've been appropiate.

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For some people, relationships between father and son can be tenuous. And if hockey's the one thing that brings these two together, who are we to judge?

The point of this guy's video was not to use his dad's illness as a bargaining chip, but rather to remind people, that for some people, hockey is more than just a game. And there are more important things in life than money.

It may be taken the wrong way, but his message is a good one.

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My father was dying when there was a lockout and it was tough not to watch hockey with him because we were both so passionate. I didn't read the article though I was in a rush to go somewhere and it sounds gross.

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God bless your mom Deb.

Also John and his dad!

I actually understand this but also would NEVER publish the picture to make the point. Never. I feel it's a very personal matter and this doesn't reflect or honour that. The picture really disturbs me.

I have a similar picture of my Mom (but I didn't capture her face, as I didn't feel it was appropriate)....she was in hospice, dying of brain cancer. I knew we didn't have long together and one of our last moments (the story of which I've told here before) was during a "Hockey Day In Canada" Canucks game. My Mom was drifting in/out and I was sitting at her bedside in the dark/curtains drawn with the sound down on her little TV. As I sat with the game muted, I reflected on all the games we'd shared together. It is a bittersweet memory - one which had my Mom "tune back in" momentarily, to comment on the game (and Trevor Linden - of course...her hero). She actually had a moment of clarity where she knew our team and, especially, that Trevor was on the ice. That did seem to offer her some comfort and familiarity in what was an awful time of confusion for her. So I do understand these feelings and the connection between a parent/child and the love of their team. How important that bonding and the memories associated with that are and how, in those final moments, we grasp to hang onto them. I also have a voicemail of Mom celebrating the Lions' Grey Cup win as well, that I treasure.

But anger has no place in this. This person is inviting hostility into what ARE likely some of his last moments with his father and that's his own choosing (and a rather selfish one, as he likely carries those vibes to his Father's bedside with him). He should focus on what's important here and make this a time of peace and tranquility....not uneasiness and tension (which tend to have a way of seeping out and infusing elsewhere). So they can't watch a game?...maybe he should do what I did and sit by his Father's bed telling stories of "remember when...." in recalling their favourite hockey moments. It doesn't mean they have to actually watch a current game....stream one of their favourite games.

Situations are what they are and what we make of them is the only thing within our control. Although I also understand and empathize with the anger that this man is feeling as he watches his Father slip away, an unselfish act would be to push that aside and focus on the positive. To ease through the letting go phase gently, vs exerting energy into fighting circumstances beyond his control.

He has his priorities all messed up as far as I'm concerned...he will never get this time back so he should be focusing his attention on making his father comfortable and that his dignity is protected. Posting pictures isn't really necessary or in line with that.

I'm with EOTM on this one...inappropriate. And rather exploitive in nature to me.

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That would be harder.

But we can also make our own music.

I can hear my daughter saying right now as I'm singing; Aww geez dad, that's horrible. Can't you just watch an old recorded game?

B)

its true

its like taking music away from us , like if all the artists across the globe went on strike because of the music industry

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"exploiting his dying Father"

A man is heartbroken his Father can't watch hockey his last days on Earth and he's "exploiting" him by making this story.

To get the NHL back?

You really think he's just "crying out for attention"

The internet is evil you people are emotionless nazi's

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Sadly one fan's story isn't going to sway anything. This lockout is about money and nothing else. All this does is make fans hate the situation even more.

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