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*Official* CBA Negotiations and Lockout Thread


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#1111 WiDeN

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 05:34 AM

I will watch the first one tonight, but I saw the 2nd one yesterday, and it's hilarious.

Edit: referring to the the last post on page 37. Go watch the videos.

Edited by WiDeN, 27 September 2012 - 05:35 AM.

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V a n c o u v e r C a n u c k s

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#1112 Boudrias

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 08:52 AM

I really shouldn't even dignify this half baked response. All NHL teams are making money with the exception of the Islanders which could barely cover their cap. If you're going to pluck one paragraph out of an entire post then you are less educated than I thought. Take the time to either read the article or the rest of my post. Having an NHL franchise is a sure bet to make millions a year, the issue is whether they are making enough.

Once again I do not understand how you can glorify the owners in this situation. It's the equivalent of your boss trying to cut your salary when the business is actually growing. Your boss in this situation would have to be particularly greedy.

It doesn't take any special virtue to be an NHL owner, and yes there was a number of suitors when teams like Nashville went up for sale, it's not the case for Pheonix as it's a failure regardless of ownership. Players on the other hand start skating at 5, and make it a life dream to one day play in the NHL. These are guys who put their bodies through torture to maybe have a chance at playing for a decade. With the increase in head injuries as of late, players are brave to continue.

Go support your owners, pay another 20% for a Canucks ticket because Aquilini doesn't have his own island like his other billionaire friends. Glad to see someone has fallen for Daly's rhetoric.

Your attitude towards this dispute appears to be based in the assumption that the owners are not virtuous, are greedy, are nothing special and are making millions. Dirty billionairs. Sad.

To me it is an issue whether they are making money because every business I ever knew that did not, went out of business. To suggest that there will always be 'owners' willing to subsidize our viewing pleasure is a leap of faith in itself. It has been a standard thought process from labour down through the decades than either business was making to much money to walk away or that business had to much capital invested in 'bricks & mortar' to be able to walk away.

You might question whether ownership is making money as does the NHLPA. Since many of these franchises are not owned by public corporations we will only be guessing. I hope they are. Certainly the players can assume that and make their demands accordingly. However, at the end of the day they are not part owners in the NHL they are a cost of doing business. Hopefully in that process both the players and ownership can mutually benefit. At some point both parties will have to agree to a process which will produce an agreement. The players agreed to a CBA in 2004 and benefited tremendously from it. In 2004 they did not see the growth in revenue and predicted player hardship. Their 57% share in revenue grew from $1.0 B to $1.83 B in 7 years. If ownership now feels that a new deal requires concession that is their decision as they risk their businesses and their future returns.

You suggested that owner friendly posters can simply expect higher ticket prices if the owners have their way. Ticket prices have been going up for decades. Most NHL tickets are more than I want to pay already and I don't go to many games. The risk the owners and players run is that more people like me won't go. If that time ever comes then they will have to react by cutting their costs. I do not expect either of these groups to take less than what they can get.

When my boy was going thru minor hockey I enjoyed his games as much as any NHL game. Eye of the beholder type stuff, right. Used to be the attraction of the 'game' to most Canadians was the fact that they had played the game. I always asked my son whether he had 'felt it' after a game. At one point I had stopped asking. One day he came home and said 'Dad I felt it tonight'. Describing what I meant by feeling it could be different for different people. For me it was having light feet, effortless stride and a desire to play all day.
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#1113 D-Bo7

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 07:10 PM

The NHL and NHLPA are scheduled to have talks all weekend. So hopefully they can start hammering this thing out with some real tangible results.
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#1114 canucktican

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 11:08 PM

The NHL and NHLPA are scheduled to have talks all weekend. So hopefully they can start hammering this thing out with some real tangible results.


Yes! *fingers crossed*
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#1115 Ossi Vaananen

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 03:41 AM

Your attitude towards this dispute appears to be based in the assumption that the owners are not virtuous, are greedy, are nothing special and are making millions. Dirty billionairs. Sad.

To me it is an issue whether they are making money because every business I ever knew that did not, went out of business. To suggest that there will always be 'owners' willing to subsidize our viewing pleasure is a leap of faith in itself. It has been a standard thought process from labour down through the decades than either business was making to much money to walk away or that business had to much capital invested in 'bricks & mortar' to be able to walk away.

You might question whether ownership is making money as does the NHLPA. Since many of these franchises are not owned by public corporations we will only be guessing. I hope they are. Certainly the players can assume that and make their demands accordingly. However, at the end of the day they are not part owners in the NHL they are a cost of doing business. Hopefully in that process both the players and ownership can mutually benefit. At some point both parties will have to agree to a process which will produce an agreement. The players agreed to a CBA in 2004 and benefited tremendously from it. In 2004 they did not see the growth in revenue and predicted player hardship. Their 57% share in revenue grew from $1.0 B to $1.83 B in 7 years. If ownership now feels that a new deal requires concession that is their decision as they risk their businesses and their future returns.

You suggested that owner friendly posters can simply expect higher ticket prices if the owners have their way. Ticket prices have been going up for decades. Most NHL tickets are more than I want to pay already and I don't go to many games. The risk the owners and players run is that more people like me won't go. If that time ever comes then they will have to react by cutting their costs. I do not expect either of these groups to take less than what they can get.

When my boy was going thru minor hockey I enjoyed his games as much as any NHL game. Eye of the beholder type stuff, right. Used to be the attraction of the 'game' to most Canadians was the fact that they had played the game. I always asked my son whether he had 'felt it' after a game. At one point I had stopped asking. One day he came home and said 'Dad I felt it tonight'. Describing what I meant by feeling it could be different for different people. For me it was having light feet, effortless stride and a desire to play all day.


I really thought you were smarter than this. First you open with how NHL owners are virtuous by keeping their businesses alive, then you go on to close with how your son loves the sport. I shouldn't have to explain how the latter deviates from your thesis. You're numbers are once again inaccurate, and you fail to consider the hit players took from 76% to 57%. Sighting the growth only further weakens your point... the owners aren't making enough of a growing pot? I'm still confused.

Ticket prices do rise and as such decreases the amount of people able to go to a game. When the demand is high for these tickets as it is now in Vancouver, ownership can risk increasing the price as they will still have 18,000 + willing to pay it. Basic economics. With rising ticket prices it becomes less likely you will be able to take your son to a game.

Yes, I'm not a fan of the super wealthy. I've had opportunities to exploit others and make substantial sums. I have 2 degrees, I'm taking a masters course while running a branch of a major industrial company. I've had a chance to sell some of our materials to major oil companies, and if the Enbridge pipeline goes through it would be a substantial profit for my larger corporation. The difference is I do not want to be wealthy at the expense of the environment or of the public - some people genuinely want to make the world a better place. Aquilinis made their money being slum lords and buying failing companies to sell for a profit; do not think there is anything virtuous about this. The Aquilinis are actually one of the better ownership groups out there, when you consider that Katz (Oilers) has retracted his 100 million$ offer towards a new stadium and is expecting the tax payer to float a 475$ million arena. He then has the audacity to ask city council for 6 million a year to help cover the expected 10 million$ operating cost. This is a man worth billions but is asking the average Joe to float his utility bill; do not think these people virtuous.
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#1116 Boudrias

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 08:41 AM

I guess I am not as smart as yourself as I don't have the degrees. My learning was more at street level. I did two startups and bought an existing business. All three of these companies prospered by providing a service which people obviously saw benefit in supporting. I made money at it. I guess my success was at the expense of the 'people'. Your more on top of this and obviously your professors taught you well.

Oh and as an analogy, one of my companies biggest customers was one of those rapers and pilliagers, a multinational oil company. Their corporate objectives were not mine and to protect my company I diversified my sales away from their influence. At the same time I learned a lot from the relationship, particularly the pilliaging which was great. At no time did I think I had a right to what was their business. If NHL players think they are so hard done by then perhaps playing hockey in Euroland will be more fullfilling.

If they want the NHL then they should hammer out a deal and get on with it. Spare me the bleeding of green. Every day you get up you comsume what this world has to offer. Perhaps the next time one of those poor NHLers passes thru a crosswalk down on Georgia, in one of their 'toys', you might rethink that.

Edited by Boudrias, 28 September 2012 - 08:42 AM.

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#1117 Boudrias

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 08:42 AM

I really thought you were smarter than this. First you open with how NHL owners are virtuous by keeping their businesses alive, then you go on to close with how your son loves the sport. I shouldn't have to explain how the latter deviates from your thesis. You're numbers are once again inaccurate, and you fail to consider the hit players took from 76% to 57%. Sighting the growth only further weakens your point... the owners aren't making enough of a growing pot? I'm still confused.

Ticket prices do rise and as such decreases the amount of people able to go to a game. When the demand is high for these tickets as it is now in Vancouver, ownership can risk increasing the price as they will still have 18,000 + willing to pay it. Basic economics. With rising ticket prices it becomes less likely you will be able to take your son to a game.

Yes, I'm not a fan of the super wealthy. I've had opportunities to exploit others and make substantial sums. I have 2 degrees, I'm taking a masters course while running a branch of a major industrial company. I've had a chance to sell some of our materials to major oil companies, and if the Enbridge pipeline goes through it would be a substantial profit for my larger corporation. The difference is I do not want to be wealthy at the expense of the environment or of the public - some people genuinely want to make the world a better place. Aquilinis made their money being slum lords and buying failing companies to sell for a profit; do not think there is anything virtuous about this. The Aquilinis are actually one of the better ownership groups out there, when you consider that Katz (Oilers) has retracted his 100 million$ offer towards a new stadium and is expecting the tax payer to float a 475$ million arena. He then has the audacity to ask city council for 6 million a year to help cover the expected 10 million$ operating cost. This is a man worth billions but is asking the average Joe to float his utility bill; do not think these people virtuous.


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#1118 Barry_Wilkins

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 01:44 PM

If they want the NHL then they should hammer out a deal and get on with it. Spare me the bleeding of green. Every day you get up you comsume what this world has to offer. Perhaps the next time one of those poor NHLers passes thru a crosswalk down on Georgia, in one of their 'toys', you might rethink that.


Though I only quoted the above, the entire post was right on the mark.

Ossi had to go down the debate fallacy path of the "call to authority". The "morals" card. Yep, Aquillini is indeed a slumlord. Even in the respectable properties he owns (with Zen), he's cheap and intransigent. I know, because my mother owned and lived in one of his apartments for years.

The point is that, as Boudrias says, we all have to negotiate with people who are immoral, and more than those, with others who are at least a little shady. Everybody's got some dirt on them, and if you don't, you're living in a monastery somewhere. But then, that wouldn't apply to anyone here, I wouldn't think.

The owners have stepped on a lot of toes to make their multimillions/billions. And the players, though the hard-working heroes of so many who watch hockey, have benefitted enormously from the lucky fact that so many of us will pay -- either directly through live gate, or indirectly through ad support of TV viewing -- large amounts to watch them play a game that they themselves are happy to indulge in at midnight once a week. More pressure on the players? Sure. But that's not really pressure, is it? It ain't the real world they're in. After you sign your three- or five-year contract, you can tool around on the ice just like in beer league central but you'll still get your $4 to $12 million. Try doing that for two weeks at any other job under an employer and see how fast they fire your a$$.

I sound like I'm siding with the owners. I'm not. As said, most are greedy and corrupt, to varying degrees. But this isn't a "fair" world. The players aren't going to get a half-way deal, not even one where it's 30-70 against them. The quicker they get off the idealistic rhetorical solidarity bandstand, the quicker they'll be better off financially, and the quicker all sides -- owners, players, fans -- can enjoy the game.

Oh, and since we're using personal experiences to back up our points, though I'm now an entrepreneur, the last job I had working for an employer saw me accept the fact that the company, and those I directly answered to, were often shady. I never lost any sleep at night, because I was as honest and honorable as possible under that set-up. But I also wasn't completely clean just because of the entire macro-level strictures. And I've been around many blocks in many different industries to know that most employess, if they're honest, will have to admit the same.

The reason I side with Boudrias and against Ossi is that the posters who agree with the latter seem to be making this out as a "moral" issue -- greedy owners, downtrodden players. Both sides, they're ALL greedy, as are all of us to varying extents. But the owners own the hammer. As others have said, the players are free to start up their own league or take away the jobs of their "brethren" in Europe. But if they were smart, they'd swallow their pride and "suffer" with the scraps the NHL deigns to throw their way.
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#1119 M A K A V E L I 96

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 03:38 PM


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#1120 -Vintage Canuck-

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 03:55 PM

@drosennhl
The afternoon CBA negotiating session has bled into the evening and it is still going.
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#1121 Bob Chen

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 04:14 PM

Lp
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Sig too big.

#1122 Mr. Self Destruct

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 05:20 PM

@drosennhl
The afternoon CBA negotiating session has bled into the evening and it is still going.


Well, at least they're still talking.
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Fire Bettman.

#1123 SamJamIam

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 07:29 PM

Well, at least they're still talking.


Sadly, reading between the lines on what Daly, the Fehrs and Bettman are saying, not much got done. This basically stems from the owners' original unrealistic starting demands. Negotiations started with the owners tossing out an insulting lowball offer. Players said "Get real" and made a totally different offer. The NHL responded by sorta kinda changing their demands but essentially just made provisions that took chunks out of HRR. So on paper they could offer the players an increased percentage of revenue while actually cutting them out entirely of some of what constitutes HRR now. NHLPA looked over the deal and said "Cut the crap, we'll deal when you're for real" and no counter offer was made. Now they're meeting again, mostly to hammer out stuff that needs to get done anyways. Bettman and Donald Fehr had a private meeting but obviously that was just a continuation of Fehr saying "Ready to table a real offer?" and Bettman replying with "When you do".

You can tell the NHL is not so much negotiating as saying "Oh yeah, here's a concession the papers can write about" even though it moves very little money. Meanwhile Bettman and Daly are going to the press and saying "They're not dealing! They want a lockout!" while ignoring that this isn't a strike. That's continued today so I can only assume the NHL is going ahead with their current approach and have no intention of changing it in the short term.
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#1124 Brick Tamland

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 09:05 PM

I heard from a player agent that I have an arms length relationship today that the two sides are One Billion dollars apart in terms of a new agreement. The agent expects one year to be lost and maybe more and said the only side that can give in is the players. It was a very sad and depressing conversation...
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#1125 The-Impersonator

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 08:38 AM

I heard from a player agent that I have an arms length relationship today that the two sides are One Billion dollars apart in terms of a new agreement. The agent expects one year to be lost and maybe more and said the only side that can give in is the players. It was a very sad and depressing conversation...


Wow - thanks for the update. At least I'll get my $5000+ back for my season tickets.
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#1126 gmen81

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 09:08 AM

--
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#1127 Drive-By Body Pierce

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 11:06 AM

I heard from a player agent that I have an arms length relationship today that the two sides are One Billion dollars apart in terms of a new agreement. The agent expects one year to be lost and maybe more and said the only side that can give in is the players. It was a very sad and depressing conversation...


*gulp*
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#1128 6YPE

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 11:34 AM

I'm getting to the point that I dont even care anymore... I've been a fan longer than most posters have been alive, and I'm sick of it... I used to side with the players, but I read a post here that changed my mind.

The bottom line is the owners own the teams, the players do not... if they want to play, sign an agreement or go play elsewhere. The players are not entitled to anything, let alone 50%....

The longer this goes, the more I am losing interest... pretty soon I wont even bother... its turning into a big waste of energy.
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#1129 TACIC

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 12:07 PM

It goes on and on
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#1130 Ossi Vaananen

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 12:30 PM

Sadly, reading between the lines on what Daly, the Fehrs and Bettman are saying, not much got done. This basically stems from the owners' original unrealistic starting demands. Negotiations started with the owners tossing out an insulting lowball offer. Players said "Get real" and made a totally different offer. The NHL responded by sorta kinda changing their demands but essentially just made provisions that took chunks out of HRR. So on paper they could offer the players an increased percentage of revenue while actually cutting them out entirely of some of what constitutes HRR now. NHLPA looked over the deal and said "Cut the crap, we'll deal when you're for real" and no counter offer was made. Now they're meeting again, mostly to hammer out stuff that needs to get done anyways. Bettman and Donald Fehr had a private meeting but obviously that was just a continuation of Fehr saying "Ready to table a real offer?" and Bettman replying with "When you do".

You can tell the NHL is not so much negotiating as saying "Oh yeah, here's a concession the papers can write about" even though it moves very little money. Meanwhile Bettman and Daly are going to the press and saying "They're not dealing! They want a lockout!" while ignoring that this isn't a strike. That's continued today so I can only assume the NHL is going ahead with their current approach and have no intention of changing it in the short term.


I like this post, you nailed the NHL's negotiating tactics and approach to the media. This is a lockout, not a strike - players did not bring this upon themselves. They signed contracts put infront of them and expect the contracts to be honoured. Well put.
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#1131 Wilbur

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 12:54 PM

I'm getting to the point that I dont even care anymore... I've been a fan longer than most posters have been alive, and I'm sick of it... I used to side with the players, but I read a post here that changed my mind.

The bottom line is the owners own the teams, the players do not... if they want to play, sign an agreement or go play elsewhere. The players are not entitled to anything, let alone 50%....

The longer this goes, the more I am losing interest... pretty soon I wont even bother... its turning into a big waste of energy.

I feel the same way (perhaps I blame the players a little less). Starting to just not care anymore, I've moved onto other things to devote my leisure time to. The feeling seems to be contagious. I tried to get my hockey pool group together for a draft and I got 1 response out of 12. Even when hockey gets back I'm not sure I'll put the energy into running it.

I will be realistic though, when hockey comes back I will watch. But it won't be with the same enthusiasm. I'll probably devote 80-90% of the time I used to. The Canucks will be all right if fans here are like that but other markets can't afford to lose that 10-20%. And can you imagine the fan apathy there will be in markets that teams will struggle? If significant time is missed all teams will be starting with zero buzz and will have to win to get it. Unfortunate thing is not every team can win, so if markets think they have it rough now, just wait.

The owners are just as greedy as the players. Do the owners realize how ridiculous it looks when an owner cries at how unfair the economics are in April, then goes out and signs not one, but TWO players to 100+ million dollar deals? Sure the owners can run the league however they want, but they got what they wanted last negoation and managed to mess that up. How are we supposed to believe that won't happen this time? If that many teams are in that much trouble three things have to happen for it to be done fairly:

1) Players get around 50% of HRR - players give up something
2) Rich teams kick in extra revenue sharing - rich teams give up something
if that's not enough after a year or two
3) move a team or two to a better market - poor teams give up something

This way, all factions give up something. Now go figure it out or I'll just get more and more apathetic about your league.
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#1132 Ossi Vaananen

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 01:19 PM

Though I only quoted the above, the entire post was right on the mark.

Ossi had to go down the debate fallacy path of the "call to authority". The "morals" card. Yep, Aquillini is indeed a slumlord. Even in the respectable properties he owns (with Zen), he's cheap and intransigent. I know, because my mother owned and lived in one of his apartments for years.

The point is that, as Boudrias says, we all have to negotiate with people who are immoral, and more than those, with others who are at least a little shady. Everybody's got some dirt on them, and if you don't, you're living in a monastery somewhere. But then, that wouldn't apply to anyone here, I wouldn't think.

The owners have stepped on a lot of toes to make their multimillions/billions. And the players, though the hard-working heroes of so many who watch hockey, have benefitted enormously from the lucky fact that so many of us will pay -- either directly through live gate, or indirectly through ad support of TV viewing -- large amounts to watch them play a game that they themselves are happy to indulge in at midnight once a week. More pressure on the players? Sure. But that's not really pressure, is it? It ain't the real world they're in. After you sign your three- or five-year contract, you can tool around on the ice just like in beer league central but you'll still get your $4 to $12 million. Try doing that for two weeks at any other job under an employer and see how fast they fire your a$$.

I sound like I'm siding with the owners. I'm not. As said, most are greedy and corrupt, to varying degrees. But this isn't a "fair" world. The players aren't going to get a half-way deal, not even one where it's 30-70 against them. The quicker they get off the idealistic rhetorical solidarity bandstand, the quicker they'll be better off financially, and the quicker all sides -- owners, players, fans -- can enjoy the game.

Oh, and since we're using personal experiences to back up our points, though I'm now an entrepreneur, the last job I had working for an employer saw me accept the fact that the company, and those I directly answered to, were often shady. I never lost any sleep at night, because I was as honest and honorable as possible under that set-up. But I also wasn't completely clean just because of the entire macro-level strictures. And I've been around many blocks in many different industries to know that most employess, if they're honest, will have to admit the same.

The reason I side with Boudrias and against Ossi is that the posters who agree with the latter seem to be making this out as a "moral" issue -- greedy owners, downtrodden players. Both sides, they're ALL greedy, as are all of us to varying extents. But the owners own the hammer. As others have said, the players are free to start up their own league or take away the jobs of their "brethren" in Europe. But if they were smart, they'd swallow their pride and "suffer" with the scraps the NHL deigns to throw their way.


I understand some of what I've said could be misconstrued as a moral argument, but please review my first response which dealt primarily with financials to make my point. Sometime after I fell for Boudrais' discourse and wrote about greed.

The bottom line if we scrape away all the various media inputs, the negotiating tactics, and the opinions that follow, we have a very simple dichotomy. One side is asking for status quo. The other is looking to rollback salaries while the business is growing, negate signed contracts and limit contractual freedoms fought for back in 2004. If this doesn't paint a very simple picture I'm not sure what does.

Edited by Ossi Vaanenen, 29 September 2012 - 01:20 PM.

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Credit to -Vintage Canuck-


#1133 The-Impersonator

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 01:52 PM

The owners offered up the rediculous contracts. If someone offered you $2 million to do your particular gob you would not turn it down.

I am season a ticket holder and to be quite honest I could care less if the season is locked out. At least I'll get my money back. If there wasn't a 5 year wait list I would honestly consider dumping them.

I bought Seahawks season tickets this season pretty much knowing I won't be going to any Canuck games.
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#1134 canuckelhead70

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 02:53 PM

The owners offered up the rediculous contracts. If someone offered you $2 million to do your particular gob you would not turn it down.

I am season a ticket holder and to be quite honest I could care less if the season is locked out. At least I'll get my money back. If there wasn't a 5 year wait list I would honestly consider dumping them.

I bought Seahawks season tickets this season pretty much knowing I won't be going to any Canuck games.


But I would also have to perform my job and not decline in production....Scott Gomez example.15.5M for 9 goals over 2 years Players hold out and players demand trades even with valid contracts. Players tell teams they will not play for them if they are drafted.

Also remember teams do offer players contracts and the player say no, I want more money, then the club gives a little more and he still says no. Then the club basically asks what is it going to take for you to sign with us, the player says x amount of dollars and the club signs them. It's not like the clubs are running around saying here's 7M here's 9M. The player, not all the time, but more then likely most of the time demands what he will sign for to play for a team. All we see is the signing amount at the end of the day not the initial offers.
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#1135 Barry_Wilkins

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 04:17 PM

I understand some of what I've said could be misconstrued as a moral argument, but please review my first response which dealt primarily with financials to make my point. Sometime after I fell for Boudrais' discourse and wrote about greed.

The bottom line if we scrape away all the various media inputs, the negotiating tactics, and the opinions that follow, we have a very simple dichotomy. One side is asking for status quo. The other is looking to rollback salaries while the business is growing, negate signed contracts and limit contractual freedoms fought for back in 2004. If this doesn't paint a very simple picture I'm not sure what does.


Last lockout I sided completely with the owners because NHL salaries were increasing exponentially, and the stupid owners had to have the cap to save themselves (and the league). The players should have seen the long-term picture in that case a lot sooner, not even mentioning the fact that the owners were passionately unified on not giving in.

This time, I agree with you that the owners, at least at this point, are the ones who look poorly. But my biggest point here is that it doesn't matter who's right or wrong. All that matters is that the owners -- though probably not as tight as last lockout -- can and will outwait the players, and just like last time, there'll be a lost season with the players getting very little increase in what the owners are now offering (though probably more movement than last time).
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#1136 ccc44

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:06 PM

I'm getting to the point that I dont even care anymore... I've been a fan longer than most posters have been alive, and I'm sick of it... I used to side with the players, but I read a post here that changed my mind.

The bottom line is the owners own the teams, the players do not... if they want to play, sign an agreement or go play elsewhere. The players are not entitled to anything, let alone 50%....

The longer this goes, the more I am losing interest... pretty soon I wont even bother... its turning into a big waste of energy.

The players should be getting 60 percent

Edited by ccc44, 30 September 2012 - 12:07 PM.

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SHOTS ! SHOTS ! SHOTS !

#1137 Tortorella's Rant

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:37 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYI7bjDsIXk


Damn you, you beat me to it.
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#1138 -Vintage Canuck-

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:39 PM

Damn you, you beat me to it.


Well, he's the one who made the video.
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#1139 -Vintage Canuck-

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:40 PM

Young Oilers Nugent-Hopkins, Eberle take lockout in stride:

OKLAHOMA CITY -- This certainly wasn't how centre Ryan Nugent-Hopkins envisioned starting the 2012-'13 hockey season.


But with plenty of uncertainty surrounding the NHL lockout, the sophomore forward is doing what he can to make the best of a bad situation.


Nugent-Hopkins was one of many Oilers youngsters in attendance Sunday at the opening of training camp for the Oklahoma City Barons, Edmonton's American Hockey League affiliate.


"It's good with everything that's going on to still get a chance to play and stay in shape," Nugent-Hopkins said. "There are some things I want to work on.


"A big thing for me is I want to be a two-way centre. I take a lot of pride in my defence, and that's something I'm definitely going to be focused on."


Nugent-Hopkins was among the NHL's top rookies last season, registering 52 points (18 goals, 34 assists) in 62 games. The former No. 1 overall selection did so despite missing 20 games with a shoulder injury.


Nugent-Hopkins sees his opportunity in Oklahoma City as a blessing in disguise, just as he does last season's injury.


"That first year I wanted to learn as much as I possibly could," he said. "It was a great learning experience.


"There were some positives from the injury. Watching the game from upstairs, I was able to see it from a different perspective, and I believe it will help me moving forward."


Moving forward is also what right-winger Jordan Eberle is concentrating on right now. Eberle hasn't spent much time in Oklahoma City, arriving Friday night, and he says he can already tell the winning attitude the team and the city have.


Eberle had 76 points (34 goals, 42 assists) last season with Edmonton. Eberle has earned a reputation for being a scorer but doesn't want to be known as a one-dimensional player.


"I've always been known as an offensive guy," he said. "That's not bad or anything, but I want to be known as a complete player.


"I get a chance to work on some things here. I'm going to work on my defence and penalty kill. With the lockout, this is the next best option here in North America. They made it to the conference final last season, and we want to continue that success. The winning attitude is great and something we want to take back with us to Edmonton. I'm going to enjoy this experience."


While Eberle will work on overall improvement, his new teammates can't wait to see what he can produce offensively.


"He can score goals, no doubt about that," defenceman Colten Teubert said. "He's going to contribute a lot of points and be exciting to watch. And for somebody his size, he is very strong with the puck.


"With Nuge (Nugent-Hopkins), he's an unbelievable playmaker. He's going to do things here that are going to make the people here in Oklahoma City say, 'Wow.' He is that special of a talent."


Barons coach Todd Nelson wasted no time getting down to business Sunday. There was no feeling-out process, instead, it was right to work on systems and schemes.


Nelson knew before the start of camp that Nugent-Hopkins and Eberle would be in attendance but realized quickly Sunday he'll have something special for however long the NHL lockout continues.


"Those are some highly skilled guys," Nelson said. "They've been impact players in the NHL.


"Obviously when they get here what that's going to do is raise the level of play for the rest of the guys. Right now they're out here working hard and having fun. It was a real good first day."


The Barons will practise all week before playing two exhibition games against the Houston Aeros on Friday and Saturday.


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#1140 Tortorella's Rant

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:41 PM

Well, he's the one who made the video.


I know. But I was hoping I could have posted it before him.. :unsure:
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