Jump to content

Welcome to canucks.com Vancouver Canucks homepage

Photo

'Super-Earth' exoplanet spotted 42 light-years away


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 key2thecup

key2thecup

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,901 posts
  • Joined: 28-November 07

Posted 08 November 2012 - 01:52 PM

'Super-Earth' exoplanet spotted 42 light-years away

Astronomers have spotted another candidate for a potentially habitable planet - and it is not too far away.

The star HD 40307 was known to host three planets, all of them too near to support liquid water.
But research to appear in Astronomy and Astrophysics has found three more - among them a "super-Earth" seven times our planet's mass, in the habitable zone where liquid water can exist.
Many more observations will be needed to confirm any other similarities.

But the find joins an ever-larger catalogue of more than 800 known exoplanets, and it seems only a matter of time before astronomers spot an "Earth 2.0" - a rocky planet with an atmosphere circling a Sun-like star in the habitable zone.

HD 40307, which lies 42 light-years away, is not particularly Sun-like - it is a smaller, cooler version of our star emitting orange light.

But it is subtle variations in this light that permitted researchers working with the Rocky Planets Around Cool Stars (Ropacs) network to find three more planets around it.

The team used the Harps instrument at the European Southern Observatory's La Silla facility in Chile.

Harps does not spot planets directly - it detects the slight changes in colour of a stars' light caused by planets' gentle gravitational tugs - the "redshift" and "blueshift" that small motions cause.
Most recently, the instrument was used to spot an exoplanet circling our second-nearest stellar neighbour, Alpha Centauri B.

It is by its nature a high-precision measurement, and it has only been with the team's improved analysis of the natural variations in HD 40307's light that the team could unpick just how many tugs were changing it.

"We pioneered new data analysis techniques including the use of the wavelength as a filter to reduce the influence of activity on the signal from this star," said University of Hertfordshire researcher and lead author of the paper Mikko Tuomi.

"This significantly increased our sensitivity and enabled us to reveal three new super-Earth planets around the star known as HD 40307, making it into a six-planet system."

The outermost of the three new finds, HD 40307g, orbits the star in about 200 Earth-days and has a mass at least seven times that of Earth, joining a growing class of exoplanets called super-Earths.
The team say that the next step is to used space-based telescopes to get a more direct look at the planet and assess its composition.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20249753


  • 0

Dr. Ron Paul 2016!

 


#2 Tystick

Tystick

    Canucks Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,506 posts
  • Joined: 21-February 12

Posted 08 November 2012 - 02:02 PM

Sounds really cool!
Imagine travelling planets for a vacation B)
  • 1
Posted Image

#3 SkeeterHansen

SkeeterHansen

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,140 posts
  • Joined: 24-May 11

Posted 08 November 2012 - 02:04 PM

Thats awesome! I love space. B)
  • 0

/=S=/


#4 TOMapleLaughs

TOMapleLaughs

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 31,924 posts
  • Joined: 19-September 05

Posted 08 November 2012 - 02:12 PM

'New China.'
  • 0
Posted Image

#5 Buddhas Hand

Buddhas Hand

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,125 posts
  • Joined: 19-December 11

Posted 08 November 2012 - 02:44 PM

I wonder why more people are not open to the idea that if there is other life-forms out there, they might not be carbon based.
  • 0

The Real war is not between the east and the west. The real war is between intelligent and stupid people.

Marjane Satrapi

tony-abbott-and-stephen-harper-custom-da

That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons that history has to teach.

Aldous Huxley.


#6 uber_pwnzor

uber_pwnzor

    Canucks Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,451 posts
  • Joined: 07-December 11

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:02 PM

If this planet has seven times the mass of our earth then I certainly hope that there isn't life on it... Imagine how freakishly strong the aliens on it would be if they had to live with that G-force! They'd pound us to death!
  • 0

#7 stexx

stexx

    Canucks Prospect

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,233 posts
  • Joined: 19-April 08

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:06 PM

Sounds really cool!
Imagine travelling planets for a vacation B)


yeah might finally be able to get away from my nagging wife to watch a hockey game! MARS HOCKEY LEAGUE HERE I COME.
  • 0

#8 Spitfire_Spiky

Spitfire_Spiky

    Comets Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 742 posts
  • Joined: 28-March 09

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:10 PM

Don't get me wrong its exciting to explore space and see whats out there but the whole point seems moot when its 42 light years away? For all we know that star could of exploded and totaled the planet 40 years ago and we wouldn't even know it for another 2 years. They need to push more for a way to travel long distances in space and so we can get to these places before they even half ass try claiming to of discovered something that may not even exist any more.
  • 0
Mess with the Best, Die like the Rest

#9 RUPERTKBD

RUPERTKBD

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,250 posts
  • Joined: 23-July 04

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:33 PM

If this planet has seven times the mass of our earth then I certainly hope that there isn't life on it... Imagine how freakishly strong the aliens on it would be if they had to live with that G-force! They'd pound us to death!



One of my favorite "hard" SF authors, Robert L. Forward, wrote a book called Dragon's Egg which was about a planet with many times Earth's gravity. The inhabitants were not superstrong giants as one might expect, but instead were small, almost Amoebic lifeforms which were able to change their shape to deal with the increased G force.

Kevin J Anderson used a similar adaptation for his Saga of Seven Suns series, about life forms that live in the heart of Gas Giants.
  • 0
Orland Kurtenbach and Dennis Kearns had just been torched 8-1 by the Habs, but they still took time to come out to meet us, some fellow BC boys who were playing hockey in Montreal. THAT"S what being a Canuck is!

#10 RUPERTKBD

RUPERTKBD

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,250 posts
  • Joined: 23-July 04

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:43 PM

Don't get me wrong its exciting to explore space and see whats out there but the whole point seems moot when its 42 light years away? For all we know that star could of exploded and totaled the planet 40 years ago and we wouldn't even know it for another 2 years. They need to push more for a way to travel long distances in space and so we can get to these places before they even half ass try claiming to of discovered something that may not even exist any more.


I'm pretty sure we have ways of figuring out whether a star's going nova is imminent.

As far as travelling these immense distances, if one assumes that the speed of light cannot be exceeded, we are left with the idea put forth by several SF authors of generational space travel.

In a nutshell, you send several experts (of both genders) on a one-way trip into space. As their offspring grow, they are instructed on what they need to know to continue the journey. Theoretically, several generations later, the descendants of the original crew arive at the destination.

The problem with this idea is that if such a thing were to happen and the information were sent back to Earth at the speed of light, it would still be hundreds of years after the start of the mission. One would expect major advances in the field of astronomy by that time, likely making these findings redundant by the time they arrived back at Earth.
  • 0
Orland Kurtenbach and Dennis Kearns had just been torched 8-1 by the Habs, but they still took time to come out to meet us, some fellow BC boys who were playing hockey in Montreal. THAT"S what being a Canuck is!

#11 Ossi Vaananen

Ossi Vaananen

    Canucks Third-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,831 posts
  • Joined: 25-April 12

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:48 PM

Waiting on that artist's rendition. Awesome that it is so close.
  • 0

2d7ye0p.jpg

 

Credit to -Vintage Canuck-


#12 AbbyNucksFan

AbbyNucksFan

    Canucks Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,434 posts
  • Joined: 26-August 09

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:50 PM

7 times the mass of earth?

someone needs to go on a diet!
  • 0
Posted Image

Credit to LostViking for the sig! Thanks!

#13 Langdon Algur

Langdon Algur

    Canucks Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,540 posts
  • Joined: 05-July 07

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:56 PM

'New China.'


Damnit does these mean the Harper Gov't is planning a pipeline from the oil sands to space now?
  • 0
"What is the good of having a nice house without a decent planet to put it on?" ~ Henry David Thoreau

CDC's 2014 draft preferences vs. Canucks actual picks
http://forum.canucks...g-2014-edition/

#14 playboi19

playboi19

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,361 posts
  • Joined: 15-August 08

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:58 PM

I'm pretty sure we have ways of figuring out whether a star's going nova is imminent.

As far as travelling these immense distances, if one assumes that the speed of light cannot be exceeded, we are left with the idea put forth by several SF authors of generational space travel.

In a nutshell, you send several experts (of both genders) on a one-way trip into space. As their offspring grow, they are instructed on what they need to know to continue the journey. Theoretically, several generations later, the descendants of the original crew arive at the destination.

The problem with this idea is that if such a thing were to happen and the information were sent back to Earth at the speed of light, it would still be hundreds of years after the start of the mission. One would expect major advances in the field of astronomy by that time, likely making these findings redundant by the time they arrived back at Earth.

Those poor kids.
  • 0

Subbancopy.jpg


#15 Rhinogator

Rhinogator

    Canucks Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,735 posts
  • Joined: 14-May 10

Posted 08 November 2012 - 04:06 PM

well 42 light years isn't that bad, assuming we can travel near the speed of light, time would slow down enough so that it feels like a week for the people in the shuttle. However, 42 years would have passed for the world.
  • 0
Posted ImagePosted Image

#16 coleman26

coleman26

    Canucks Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,520 posts
  • Joined: 09-August 12

Posted 08 November 2012 - 04:18 PM

well 42 light years isn't that bad, assuming we can travel near the speed of light, time would slow down enough so that it feels like a week for the people in the shuttle. However, 42 years would have passed for the world.


Sorry, it's actually quite the opposite. It would take 42 years for the shuttle travelling at the speed of light to get there, and the distortion of time relative to their speed would affect the people left behind. For the people travelling at the speed of light, time would appear to run at a rate of 1 second per second, while the people they were whipping past would experience them as only a blur. As it stands, unless they begin finding wormholes around the universe, 42 light years will be the distance traveled by any object moving at the speed of light for 42 years
  • 0

#17 Offensive Threat

Offensive Threat

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,480 posts
  • Joined: 18-March 03

Posted 08 November 2012 - 06:04 PM

, assuming we can travel near the speed of light,


That is a hell of a lot to assume. The fastest any human has ever traveled is 24,830 MPH by the crew of Apollo 10 in 1969. The speed of light is over 670 million miles per hour. So we have done less than 1% of the speed of light. Less than 0.01% actually. But we havent really been trying yet.
  • 0

Posted Image


#18 TheAntar

TheAntar

    Canucks Prospect

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,150 posts
  • Joined: 15-February 06

Posted 08 November 2012 - 06:29 PM

Coleman -- you may be quoting from another theory but if Einstein is right, it would in fact be that much less time passed for those people travelling near light speed.

The best analogy I know comes from physicist Brian Green who explains...


If time is north-south and space is east-west, the more you aim west (or travel through space) the less you're aimed north (traveling through time). In other words if you travel at Einsteins theoretical max speed -- that of light and/or gravity -- you don't travel through time at all... while if you move very close to the speed of light, you travel very subtly through time.

This would have the effect of it feeling like a very short trip if you're part of it, while taking just the 'right' amount of time (in this case 42 years) if you were stuck on Earth.

(edited as I made a couple typos on my iphone)

Edited by TheAntar, 08 November 2012 - 06:37 PM.

  • 0

#19 Hobble

Hobble

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,644 posts
  • Joined: 27-June 07

Posted 08 November 2012 - 06:51 PM

I really wish humanity would invest more in space travel. If they put as much money into it as oil or the next iPad, we'd be colonizing Mars by now.

I want a Halo/Mass Effect society, minus the galactic war.
  • 0

#20 theminister

theminister

    Canucks Franchise Player

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,293 posts
  • Joined: 07-July 03

Posted 08 November 2012 - 07:00 PM

I really wish humanity would invest more in space travel. If they put as much money into it as oil or the next iPad, we'd be colonizing Mars by now.

I want a Halo/Mass Effect society, minus the galactic war.


You're going to want that iPad in a Martian winter. :lol:

Just joking. You're right. Sort of. These consumer technologies advance us pretty quickly along the road we will need to travel to get to that future. What we are doing wrong is not investing in both.

Wasn't there some physicist who was working on the theory of a 'gravity laser?' I forget the details but it had something to do with tuning pure gravity towards a specific point in space and folding the two places together. The upshot, if I remember correctly, was that you didn't have to use existing wormholes. The downside was that you would need to build it a significant distance away from any bodies in the solar system. Anyone remember this?
  • 0

small.pngNEW YORK ISLANDERS ROSTER - CDC GM LEAGUEsmall.png


2013 CDCGML CUP CHAMPIONS


#21 coleman26

coleman26

    Canucks Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,520 posts
  • Joined: 09-August 12

Posted 08 November 2012 - 07:38 PM

Coleman -- you may be quoting from another theory but if Einstein is right, it would in fact be that much less time passed for those people travelling near light speed.


Interesting. i'll have to double check that, but it seems to fly in the face of everything I've ever understood to be true. I could very well be wrong, of course.
  • 0

#22 Green Building

Green Building

    Canucks Prospect

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,438 posts
  • Joined: 16-October 09

Posted 08 November 2012 - 08:03 PM

Interesting. i'll have to double check that, but it seems to fly in the face of everything I've ever understood to be true. I could very well be wrong, of course.


http://www.pbs.org/w...hotsciencetwin/

Travelling at the speed of light indeed slows time to a fraction of how we recognize, and interpret it, during everyday activities. You may be right though, when you say " time would appear to run at at rate of one second per second ", as time would feel normal, if feel is the right word. Simply put, it might just be another form of spatial awareness we don't have any experience in reacting to yet.

edit: this is not really on topic, but a really great video I had to find to help explain relative light speed and time dilation to those who are curious

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHRK6ojWdtU&feature=related

Edited by Green Building, 08 November 2012 - 08:28 PM.

  • 0

#23 RUPERTKBD

RUPERTKBD

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,250 posts
  • Joined: 23-July 04

Posted 08 November 2012 - 08:05 PM

Those poor kids.

They wouldn't know anything else...
  • 0
Orland Kurtenbach and Dennis Kearns had just been torched 8-1 by the Habs, but they still took time to come out to meet us, some fellow BC boys who were playing hockey in Montreal. THAT"S what being a Canuck is!

#24 Heretic

Heretic

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,476 posts
  • Joined: 08-April 07

Posted 08 November 2012 - 08:13 PM

That is a hell of a lot to assume. The fastest any human has ever traveled is 24,830 MPH by the crew of Apollo 10 in 1969. The speed of light is over 670 million miles per hour. So we have done less than 1% of the speed of light. Less than 0.01% actually. But we havent really been trying yet.


Yes...but a few months before my 100th birthday, on April 5, 2063, Zefram Cochrane will be the first human to travel at the speed of light.
  • 0

McCoy: We were speculating. Is God really out there?
Kirk: Maybe he's not out there, Bones. Maybe he's right here. [points to his heart]

Posted Image


#25 coleman26

coleman26

    Canucks Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,520 posts
  • Joined: 09-August 12

Posted 08 November 2012 - 09:51 PM

Yeah, it does appear like my understanding of time dilation was completely incorrect. Thanks for the link though, I'm not a big fan of being wrong, so that'll help :)
  • 0

#26 Green Building

Green Building

    Canucks Prospect

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,438 posts
  • Joined: 16-October 09

Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:40 PM

Yeah, it does appear like my understanding of time dilation was completely incorrect. Thanks for the link though, I'm not a big fan of being wrong, so that'll help :)


No worries dude. For me, I would rather be corrected when wrong, than to continue being wrong forever.

That, and what's the point of discussion otherwise. ;)
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Canucks.com is the official Web site of The Vancouver Canucks. The Vancouver Canucks and Canucks.com are trademarks of The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership.  NHL and the word mark and image of the Stanley Cup are registered trademarks and the NHL Shield and NHL Conference logos are trademarks of the National Hockey League. All NHL logos and marks and NHL team logos and marks as well as all other proprietary materials depicted herein are the property of the NHL and the respective NHL teams and may not be reproduced without the prior written consent of NHL Enterprises, L.P.  Copyright © 2009 The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership and the National Hockey League.  All Rights Reserved.