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DonLever

Man Challenges Vancouver's Ban On Sleeping On The Streets

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A 57 year old man, aided by the Pivot Legal Society, is heading to the courts to challenge Vancouver's ban on sleeping on streets, parks, and public properties.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...ss-lawsuit.html

Clarence Taylor was ticketed several times by police and harassed by police and city officials.

The Pivot lawyers said people should be allowed to sleep on overpasses and boulevards where they would be in no one's way.

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“The reality is there is whole swaths of city streets, including under overpasses, boulevards, they're not in anybody's way, they're not causing any obstructions,” said Bernstein. “We feel that, if people feel they'd feel safest sleeping there, they should be able to sleep there legally.”
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I hope the bylaw is upheld. I have no sympathy.

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Well, Mayor Robertson said he will end homelessness by 2015. So by that time, there should be no more need to enforce the existing bylaws.

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You know what would be nice?

To have pivot legal society stand up for the public at large that gets harassed by homeless people looking for a handout.

Oh, and not having lawyers using their ability to challenge the courts for free to push their own political agenda.

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Well, Mayor Robertson said he will end homelessness by 2015. So by that time, there should be no more need to enforce the existing bylaws.

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This speaks to a much larger societal problem that should be addressed. Whether people can sleep under overpasses shouldn't be the question. WHY people are having to sleep under overpasses is the question.

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This speaks to a much larger societal problem that should be addressed. Whether people can sleep under overpasses shouldn't be the question. WHY people are having to sleep under overpasses is the question.
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Here in AUS we have heard simmiliar BS before

25 years later

One in eight people living in poverty in Australia: new report

13 October 2012

The Australian Council of Social Service has today released a new report showing poverty in Australia remains a persistent problem with an estimated 2,265,000 people or 12.8% of all people living below the internationally accepted poverty line used to measure financial hardship in wealthy countries.

The report provides the most comprehensive picture of poverty in the nation since 2006 and shows that people who are unemployed, children (especially in lone parent families), and people whose main source of income is social security payments, are the groups most at risk of poverty.

"This report reveals that despite years of unprecedented growth and wealth creation, we have made little ground in combatting the scourge of poverty with 1 in 8 people overall and 1 in 6 children living below the poverty line," said ACOSS CEO, Dr Cassandra Goldie.

"In a wealthy country like Australia, this is simply inexcusable

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The BC Court of Appeal dealt with a similar issue in its 2009 decsion in Victoria (City) v. Adams, 2009 BCCA 563 which involved a Victoria by-law:

http://www.canlii.org/en/bc/bcca/doc/2009/2009bcca563/2009bcca563.pdf

That case involved the homeless setting up temporary overnight shelters (not just sleeping in the space). The appeal court ruled that Victoria’s bylaws violated section 7 of the Charter (“life, liberty, and security of the person”). However, the court disagreed with the trial judge’s declaration that the bylaws were arbitrary. According to the Court of Appeal, the bylaws were not arbitrary, but they were overbroad and thus violated the Charter. The bylaws were declared of no force and effect “insofar and only insofar as they apply to prevent homeless people from erecting temporary overnight shelter in parks when the number of homeless people exceeds the number of available shelter beds in the City of Victoria.”

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The BC Court of Appeal dealt with a similar issue in its 2009 decsion in Victoria (City) v. Adams, 2009 BCCA 563 which involved a Victoria by-law:

http://www.canlii.or...2009bcca563.pdf

That case involved the homeless setting up temporary overnight shelters (not just sleeping in the space). The appeal court ruled that Victoria’s bylaws violated section 7 of the Charter (“life, liberty, and security of the person”). However, the court disagreed with the trial judge’s declaration that the bylaws were arbitrary. According to the Court of Appeal, the bylaws were not arbitrary, but they were overbroad and thus violated the Charter. The bylaws were declared of no force and effect “insofar and only insofar as they apply to prevent homeless people from erecting temporary overnight shelter in parks when the number of homeless people exceeds the number of available shelter beds in the City of Victoria.”

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The BC Court of Appeal dealt with a similar issue in its 2009 decsion in Victoria (City) v. Adams, 2009 BCCA 563 which involved a Victoria by-law:

http://www.canlii.or...2009bcca563.pdf

That case involved the homeless setting up temporary overnight shelters (not just sleeping in the space). The appeal court ruled that Victoria’s bylaws violated section 7 of the Charter (“life, liberty, and security of the person”). However, the court disagreed with the trial judge’s declaration that the bylaws were arbitrary. According to the Court of Appeal, the bylaws were not arbitrary, but they were overbroad and thus violated the Charter. The bylaws were declared of no force and effect “insofar and only insofar as they apply to prevent homeless people from erecting temporary overnight shelter in parks when the number of homeless people exceeds the number of available shelter beds in the City of Victoria.”

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Don't want to work, don't want to put the effort out to get the many handouts they'd be given either. Perpetual victims. I feel sorry only for the mentally unstable, especially if they've done something useful for society and worked, or even served in the military.

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I choose to be homeless, cause I don't like to work. I know not to sleep on overpasses or the streets and so do my homeless colleagues

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I'd wager a shiny looney that the vast majority fall in to this category.

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we foresaw this happening when they closed down riverview to cut costs to fit budgets (or make bonuses/get good public opinion?). didn't matter that they'd offload the social cost to another area which taxpayers would still be responsible for - the police, the ERs and the courts.

mental health care costs just don't garner too much advocacy, publicity or good public opinion.

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