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Grapefruits

Convicted animal killer to be released in months

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I want to first make a disclaimer that the reasons I am about to provide are based on my own beliefs. These aren't official, documented reasons for why psychopaths are not placed in mental health facilities. I don't believe there is any documented reason. So, my explanation I provide is not something I stand by unequivocally. At the current time, this is what I believe.

The main reason why psychopaths are not put into mental health facilities:

Because psychopathy is not in the DSM, there is no real ground to stand on to suggest that this is an identified personality disorder. Certifying someone under the Mental Health Act requires that the certification be based on someone with a known disorder. Since psychopathy, while widely regarded as a personality disorder, does not exist within the DSM, they cannot be classified, which makes certification (i.e. hospitalization) not possible.

Secondary reasons:

(a) Related to the first point, the assessment of psychopathy is still in its infancy (relative to other mental disorders). Moreover, there is a lot of debate surrounding (1) what are the key components of psychopathy, and (2) how do we measure these components? Currently, Dr. Robert Hare's PCL-R is considered the gold standard as a measure of psychopathy. Yet, there is mountains of criticism regarding this instrument, particular its overemphasis on behavioural characteristics.

The reason why this is an issue for certification into a mental hospital is that, if we are not yet sure what the best way to measure psychopathy is, should we really be certifying an individual based on their psychopathy diagnosis? What if it isn't accurate? What if they are just bordering on the cut score for psychopath/non-psychopath? Without an official DSM criteria to stand on, it is a bit of a risk to be fully confident in saying, in every case, that "yes, this person is a psychopath".

(b ) Stigma. Related to point (a), psychopathy carries with it connotations that are far worse than saying someone is, for example, schizophrenic. Schizophrenia can be managed. Psychopathy cannot. If you are going to say that someone is a psychopath, that is a label that they will carry forever, and people will (and rightfully so) give up on the idea of treating them. However, as mentioned in point (a), what if our diagnosis was wrong?

( c) Hospital Management. At times, it must be hell on earth to be a nurse in a mental health facility. Throw psychopathy into the mix, and nurses would probably be begging for hell. Psychopaths would pose a risk to other patients/inmates and staff. Additionally, psychopaths would probably have a negative impact on the ability of hospitalized non-psychopaths to receive adequate treatment. For psychopaths, they are better off incarcerated in prisons, not in mental health facilities, IMO.

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I'd hit it, crazy in the head, crazy in bed FTW!

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I'd hit it, crazy in the head, crazy in bed FTW!

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She looks like an animal.

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Ok so what is needed is better tools to assess if someone is a danger to society or not and I can understand wanting to have that under control before one is arbitrarily tossed into jail.

However what you should as a group be lobbying for at least is that when one is clearly high scoring and with clear evidence that they intend to follow through on things (such as the case of people like the subject here who was already in jail for violence). In others words its understandable to not just pull people in off the streets but when they already have a violent criminal history perhaps those two things together will help zero in on the most critical people.

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She's been released:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2013/01/07/bc-kayla-bourque-released.html

A former Simon Fraser University student who was convicted of torturing and killing animals and admitted to wanting to kill homeless people has been released from jail and will live in Vancouver.

Kayla Bourque, 23, was convicted in November of causing unnecessary pain, suffering or injury to animals, willfully and without lawful excuse killing animals and possessing a weapon for a dangerous purpose. Child pornography charges she was facing were stayed.

The former SFU criminology student has admitted to taking delight in killing animals and fantasizing about shooting homeless people. Several psychologists who interviewed Bourque found she showed no remorse or insight into her crimes.

On Monday morning, Corrections Canada confirmed Bourque was released on probation after serving about eight months in custody.

She will be closely monitored by authorities and will have to abide by 46 court-ordered conditions that will severely restrict her movements and activities, said officials.

Under the conditions, Bourque is not allowed to have anyone in her home from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m., and anyone who does visit must be made fully aware of the charges she pleaded guilty to and their circumstances.

She can't associate with anyone under the age of 18 or access the internet. She is also banned from possessing duct tape, hypodermic needles or knives.

Showed no remorse or insight

One psychologist who spoke with Bourque ahead of her sentencing in Vancouver provincial court last year testified she will likely require supervision for the rest of her life.

'While intelligent and articulate, she had a preoccupation for causing pain.'
—Judge Malcolm Maclean

Other doctors described her as a sexual sadist and narcissist with an anti-social personality disorder and sociopathic tendencies.

"It is clear that Ms. Bourque is a very unique and troubling case," said Judge Malcolm Maclean as he delivered what he described as "probably one of the most comprehensive probation orders I've ever done."

Adopted from a Romanian orphanage at the age of eight months, Bourque grew up in Prince George, B.C. While in high school, Maclean said she admitted to having the urge to "kill someone."

Enrolled at SFU in criminology

After graduation, she enrolled in criminology and psychology at Simon Fraser University.

While living in residence last March, she told another student she had disemboweled and dismembered cats in the Prince George area and that she fantasized about getting a gun and shooting a homeless person.

She also said she wanted to kill someone in residence and was taking forensic classes because she wanted to "get away" with something in the future.

The classmate told campus security, and police were alerted.

Bourque was initially arrested under the Mental Health Act and a search of her residence turned up a blue nylon bag with a kitchen knife, a razor blade, three large garbage bags, a hypodermic needle and a mask.

Police also found a video showing her killing the family dog. Another video showed Bourque torturing the family cat.

Bourque's mother has said she does not want her daughter living in the family home.

"While intelligent and articulate," MacLean said. "She had a preoccupation for causing pain."

The probation order will be reviewed in three months.

Court ordered conditions of Kayla Bourque's release:

  • Not to leave residence between the hours of 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. daily seven days a week except: (a) for the purposes of obtaining emergency medical treatment, (B) and except with the prior written permission of a probation officer.

  • Not to associate with any person under the age of 18.

  • Not to attend any public school, parks, playgrounds, or public swimming pools, or areas adjacent to the swimming pools or any other locations where it can reasonably be expected that persons under the age of 18 are likely to be present.

  • Not to possess any computer or telecommunication device capable of accessing the internet.

  • Not to access to any social networking sites.

  • Attend, participate in, and complete the BC Corrections Branch core programs.

  • Attend and participate in psychiatric/psychological assessments, counselling or educational programming as may be directed and to the satisfaction of a probation officer.

  • Immediately advise probation officer of any close, intimate, familiar, or familial relationships and refrain from continuing such a relationship until that person has been advised of criminal record and background in the presence of a probation officer.

  • Not to engage in any areas of study, employment, or volunteer work involving contact with any animals or any vulnerable person, which includes but is not limited to the elderly, persons under the age of 18, the infirmed, or persons with physical or mental disabilities.

  • Not to attend any college or university or enrol in any post secondary courses.

  • Not to possess any weapons as defined in the Criminal Code of Canada including firearms, imitation firearms, ammunition, crossbows, or explosive substance, or any related authorization, licences, permits, or registration certificates in relation to those.

  • Not to possess any knives or other bladed instruments except for the immediate preparation and consumption of food, for the actual course of lawful employment and only at the sites of such employment.

  • Prohibited from owning, having custody or control of, or residing in any premises where animals or birds are present.

  • Not to attend any campus or property occupied by Simon Fraser University, including any adjacent parking lots or student residences.

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This is not the last we will hear of Kayla Bourque. Unfortunately.

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