Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Wetcoaster

Harper Rejects Recommendations to Loosen Restrictions on Firearms

32 posts in this topic

It seems time that people need to listen when PM Harper speaks of government policy and what his government would do in future. We have seen it on the issue of abortion, the death penalty and now gun control laws.

The Canadian Firearms Advisory Committee (CFAC) recently recommended changes to the gun control laws including making some prohibited weapons, including handguns and assault rifles, by reclassifying them to make them more easily available. It also recommended making firearm licences good for at least 10 years, rather than the current five - a measure opposed by police who say the five-year renewals are a chance to weed out unstable gun owners.

When the recommendations were reported gun enthusiasts were ecstatic. "A shocking outbreak of common sense? What are they drinking in Ottawa these days?" said one poster on Outdoorsmenforum.ca. "This is great! I am so glad we have a government that has some common sense ... at least for now," wrote another.

Well not so fast gunpowder breath...

Back in January 2011 PM Harper did his famous interview with the CBC's Peter Mansbridge in which he re-affirmed that if re-elected his government had no intention of making changes to the current abortion laws nor re-opening the debate on the abolition of capital punishment.

During that interview he also spoke of the gun control laws. He re-affirmed the Tories intention to follow through and scrap the long gun gun registry if re-elected and that was done.

However it seems the pro-gun lobby overlooked that he also vowed to not loosen other rules, such as licensing of gun owners or restricting handguns. "The core of our gun laws are supported by most gun owners," he said.

The CFAC recommendations did precisely that and in the House of Commons PM Harper made it clear those changes are not going to be made by his government. Harper told the Commons Thursday that a firearms committee report doesn't reflect the views of the government and that he would consider Liberal leader Bob Rae's proposal to expand the advisory committee to include police chiefs, anti-domestic violence groups and suicide prevention officers.

“Let me be as clear as I can be,” the prime minister said in response to a question from NDP Leader Tom Mulcair.

“Prohibited weapons exist as a category under the law for essential reasons of public security. The government has absolutely no intention of weakening that category of protections.”

Mr. Harper stressed repeatedly that the recommendations contained in a March 2012 “memorandum for the minister” are not government policy.

And when interim Liberal Leader Bob Rae suggested the government’s advisory committee — which is dominated by sport shooting enthusiasts and those opposed to gun control — needed wider representation, including from police chiefs, those fighting domestic violence and groups dealing with suicide prevention, Mr. Harper all but agreed.

“I will take the advice of the leader of the Liberal party under consideration,” Mr. Harper responded.

“I’m obviously very concerned with some of the recommendations made in that report, and I think the committee does need some re-examination in that light.”

The prime minister’s comments will certainly be a come-down for gun enthusiasts who were cheering a Toronto Star report of the committee recommendations earlier Thursday.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/harper-rejects-committees-advice-to-relax-gun-laws/article6033474/

And the Canadian gun control regime seems to be working:

Both Harper and Toews stressed the Conservative government's firearm focus is now on tougher sentences for gun-related convictions.

"We've made it very clear that we see no benefit to the long-gun registry," Toews told the Commons.

"However, what we have indicated is that we must continue to implement measures that in fact target the criminal use of firearms."

The Public Safety minister also noted that firearms crime rates are at their lowest in 50 years.

The homicide rate from guns is down 30 per cent since 2008, Toews added, "because of the very strong measures that this government has taken against the criminal use of firearms."

http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Changes+control+have+bearing+violence+against+women+says/7661235/story.html

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For all the hate Harper gets I actually have enjoyed all of his moves. Never voted for him but if I could vote again I just might.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Common sense prevails .. good policy .. if you throw enough darts you WILL eventually hit the target .. :rolleyes:

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a member of the "gunpowder breath" group. I have no problem with most of our firearms laws. I do have questions on why they chose 4.2" barrels as a restriction instead of just anything under 4" is prohibited (which would make sense). I mean do you really think .2" is enough to make a firearm that much easier to conceal? I get why .25 and .32 calibre's are prohibited to avoid the whole cheap firearm "Saturday Night Specials". Unlike others have no issues with non-restricted and restricted firearms being registered. My car and motorcycle are registered and I'm licensed to ride/drive both. Why should a firearm be any different?

As someone who goes to the range to shoot, I find it odd that you can have a .22LR rifle and have a 30 round clip, but buy a Finnish rifle in 9mm it's pinned to five rounds. Yet I can have a pistol in 9mm and I can have a 10 round magazine. The inconsistency of the rules seem odd.

But I'd rather have rules that are easy to follow, and I understand the rationale behind them, than just owning whatever the hell you want with no instruction like the Excited States of America. You mention anything about being logical and safe with firearms and just basic regulation, they go all psycho. As far as I'm concerned firearms like driving is a privilege not a right.

IMG_0531.jpg

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dec. 3rd. Conservatives are calling Justin Trudeau a flip-flopper for first voting for the long gun registry and then recently admitting it was a failed policy. That's fine, but lest Conservatives forget, Stephen Harper did the exact same thing. This Conservative Prime Minister in 1995 voted in support of the long gun registry twice before opposing it all within the same year.

Conservatives might not support a gun registry, but perhaps they could at least support registering a memory or two.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man, it's getting hard to track where the guy stands on firearms.

I think it depends on who he's talking to at the time. The need for politicians to pet Alberta's love for guns seems to be great.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is it hard to track? Like he said on abortion and the death penalty, it seems quite clear.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is it hard to track? Like he said on abortion and the death penalty, it seems quite clear.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harper flops on abortion:

Aug 23rd.Ottawa refuses to fund abortion in G8 plan

Canada is refusing to fund abortion services as part of a G8 initiative to improve the health of mothers in poor countries.

Just as G8 officials arrived in Halifax for talks on the maternal-health initiative on Monday, the Conservative government said that other Group of Eight nations can finance projects that include abortion services if they choose - but Canada won't.

However, the political stumbles and controversy over abortion in Canada, the host of this June's G8 summit, raised concerns that the position could lead to clashes with other countries and slow progress on the initiative, which is aimed at reducing childbirth and infant deaths through vaccinations, better nutrition, clean water and basic medical care.

The Harper government's flip-flops on whether it would provide aid to programs that include contraception, and its stand against abortion, have already caused tension.

Last month, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and British Foreign Secretary David Milliband said any maternal-health initiative must include family planning and access to safe abortions.

On Monday, International Co-operation Minister Bev Oda tried to smooth away those conflicts. The G8 talks in Halifax this week will include consideration of family-planning projects, but Canada won't fund abortions, she said, adding that other G8 countries can make that part of their contribution if they want.

"Within the scope of this G8 initiative, countries will be able to identify their own priorities," Ms. Oda told reporters in Halifax before meeting counterparts from other G8 countries for two days of talks.

"Canada's contribution to maternal and child health may involve various interventions, including family planning, which includes the use of contraceptive methods. The details remain to be determined, however, Canada's contribution will not include funding for abortion."

Her parliamentary secretary, Jim Abbott, echoed the statement in the House of Commons.

NDP Leader Jack Layton charged that Prime Minister Stephen Harper's government is now offside with the G8 consensus on the initiative, which was Canada's own idea. Liberal MP Bob Rae asked whether it meant Canada will cut off aid to governments of poor countries with family-planning programs that include abortion.

"Does that mean we're going to boycott governments that have a freedom of choice policy in their country?" he asked.

The question of whether family planning would be part of the G8 maternal-health initiative is deemed important by most experts because many of the estimated 500,000 childbirth deaths in developing countries each year are caused by complications from women becoming pregnant too young and too often in quick succession.

The inclusion of safe abortion services, where they are legal, is also promoted by many experts, because so many deaths are caused by complications from botched abortions.

"There isn't a division on what it includes or not includes. Canada's initiative, that [G8 countries]support, is saving the lives of mothers and children under the age of 5, and it does not mean supporting abortions," Ms. Oda said.

She argued that the U.S. development agency USAID also does not fund abortions - but experts noted that it finances family-planning organizations and government programs that include abortion.

Funding family planning but not abortions will be impractical in the real world, said Katherine McDonald, executive director of Action Canada for Population and Development. To cut off abortion funding, Canada must cut off all funding for any family-planning program that provides abortions.

"If Canada follows that model, it's a replica of the Bush-era global gag law. If they don't, how will we know that none of the money is used for abortion?" she said.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What did he have to say about the environment in his election promises?

Artists join opposition to water protection act changes

Musicians, including environmental activist Sarah Harmer, are joining those raising concerns about the Harper government's second omnibus budget legislation.

C-45 includes changes to the Navigable Waters Protection Act that limit federal protection for waterways to only 62 rivers, 97 lakes and three oceans that are specifically included in a list annexed to the bill. The government says it has chosen to protect only the busiest waterways in Canada that meet specific criteria for navigation.

...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liberal leadership candidate Marc Garneau is calling for an outright ban on assault weapons.

Liberal Marc Garneau floats assault weapon ban

But party leadership candidate says he wouldn't revive long-gun registry

The Canadian Press Posted: Dec 18, 2012 4:52 PM ET Last Updated: Dec 19, 2012

There's no reason semi-automatic rifles like the one used to slaughter 20 young schoolchildren in Connecticut should be available in Canada, says Liberal leadership hopeful Marc Garneau.

The Montreal MP said Tuesday he'd look at banning semi-automatic weapons, like the military-style, .223-calibre Bushmaster used in last week's massacre.

"There is absolutely no reason that anybody can vote to say that that kind of weapon, that can fire off great numbers of rounds like that, is necessary," Garneau told The Canadian Press.

"That kind of weapon, to me, definitely — well, it is (already) a restricted weapon but one should look at not allowing those things."

Gunman Adam Lanza used a Bushmaster to mow down 20 Grade 1 students at a Newtown, Conn., elementary school last Friday. He also killed six educators and his mother before killing himself.

Garneau noted that almost exactly a year ago, a deranged man attacked students at a primary school in central China. Because he was wielding a knife, not a gun, the carnage was far less —22 children and one adult injured, but no deaths.

"This person had the same kind of intent as the person in Newtown but all of the kids today are still alive."

The Bushmaster is currently a restricted firearm in Canada but it is legal to own one under certain conditions.

A person must be 18 years of age, pass a restricted firearms safety course and obtain a firearms licence and registration certificate. A restricted weapon can be licensed for use in target practice or target shooting competitions or as part of a gun collection.

In limited circumstances, a restricted firearm may be allowed in pursuit of one's occupation or to protect life.

Semi-automatics in Canada are generally restricted to magazines holding only five cartridges.

Garneau proposes tighter gun controls

Several weeks ago, Garneau proposed a four-point plan for tightening gun control in Canada, including further limiting access to assault weapons. He went further Tuesday, suggesting an outright ban.

He said his aim is "putting them out of circulation, not allowing them to be used."

Garneau also said he'd go further than the Harper Conservatives in imposing "very severe" penalties on those who use guns in the commission of crimes.

He'd restrict ownership of guns by people with a history of domestic violence or involvement in gangs and he'd beef up interdiction of firearms flowing illegally across the border from the United States.

Garneau reiterated, however, that he would not revive the Liberal-created long-gun registry, which the Conservative government scrapped earlier this year.

"It was an initiative that had some strong points, in the sense that the police and the RCMP supported it, as did groups representing victims and others," he said.

"But it also had some bad points in that many Canadians, particularly in rural areas, were dead set against it. So it became a very, very divisive issue in this country.

"The Conservatives have killed it and I would not bring it back."

Justin Trudeau, the presumptive front-runner in the leadership contest, has similarly said the gun registry was a failed policy which he would not resurrect.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/12/18/pol-cp-marc-garneau-liberal-leadership-assault-rifle-ban.html

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1977 called, it wants its gun control measure back.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Unnecessary hysteria that stems from south of the border. (edit: whoops, make that two posts up now)

Our restrictions work fine for us, no need to change them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"There is absolutely no reason that anybody can vote to say that that kind of weapon, that can fire off great numbers of rounds like that, is necessary," Garneau told The Canadian Press.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone needs to tell Marc Garneau that the magazines in Canada (under law) are only allowed to hold 5 rounds.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.