Jump to content

Welcome to canucks.com Vancouver Canucks homepage

Photo

The War on Christmas is Over... Christmas Won but only In Canada, Pity


  • Please log in to reply
201 replies to this topic

#61 hudson bay rules

hudson bay rules

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,386 posts
  • Joined: 03-November 10

Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:40 PM

*
POPULAR

I know many Sikh, Chinese and other non-Christian families that "celebrate" Christmas as a family friendly gift giving event. All of them call it Christmas and aren't bothered in the slightest by the festivities they encounter in their new found home.

On a side note, they start playing Christmas tunes in Sept in the Philippines. :shock:
  • 5
I love rock and roll, just put another dime in the juice box baby.

#62 Lockhart

Lockhart

    Canucks Prospect

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,338 posts
  • Joined: 30-July 09

Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:46 PM

If all these immigrants are offended by Christmas, I'll drive them to the airport myself.
  • 3

#63 Bitter Melon

Bitter Melon

    Canucks Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,968 posts
  • Joined: 04-August 11

Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:47 PM

Holidays in the winter have existed long before, and will continue to exist long after Christmas. People like to celebrate when it gets dark at 4pm and it's always cold. Cheers up an otherwise bleak season.

Christmas traditions existed long before Christianity, and were adopted to help pagans phase over into a monotheistic religion. It's fun to celebrate. Food, family, gifts, all the seasonal specials on tv, etc. No matter what your religion, it doesn't matter, people can celebrate what they want.

I would say I'm baffled that people legitimately get offended by someone wishing them well, but given how PC and easily offended people are these days, I would be lying.

People need thicker skins.
  • 1

#64 Phil_314

Phil_314

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,234 posts
  • Joined: 07-November 09

Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:52 PM

Good. Interesting that this came up - our pastor gave a sermon on Sunday about "what next? we have to take the Christ out of our homes as well"?

However you want to celebrate this time of the year is fine by me.
Just don't tell me that I can't say Merry Christmas - that's would be the real "pity".


Agreed with the quote

Also, two things I don't understand are the imposition of "Season's Greetings" on Christmas cards, and the generic switching of "Christmas" for "Holiday". If an occasion can be switched for such a random term as "holiday", then what about (as mentioned) "Hanukkah", "Remembrance Day", or "Halloween"?

I'm certain you could find someone who experienced traumatic scares as children and so they are strongly averse to getting scared during Halloween, or they don't like to celebrate "freedom" that was purchased at the cost of many lives and large-scale destruction in other countries (what if the person was a pacifist, lost someone dear to them in war or immigrated to Canada after living in a place which was devastated in battle?). If anyone was to be offended and all P.C. I think those people would be most deserving of that privilege.

Edited by g@m3b0i, 10 December 2012 - 03:53 PM.

  • 1

John 3:16
For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. 17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him.


Jesus LOVES YOU!
2012, meet Matthew 24:36-47!

14 I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus.


#65 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:53 PM

Sorry, that's can't be proven in a court of law.

FYI, it was the Romans that "stole" it as you word it. - Not the Christians.

"Emperor Domitian (AD 51-96) may have changed Saturnalia’s date to December 25th in an attempt to assert his authority. He curbed Saturnalia’s subversive tendencies by marking it with public events under his control. The poet Statius (AD 45- 95), in his poem Silvae, describes the lavish banquet and entertainments Domitian presided over, including games which opened with sweets, fruit and nuts showered on the crowd and featuring flights of flamingos released over Rome. Shows with fighting dwarves and female gladiators were illuminated, for the first time, into the night.
The conversion of Emperor Constantine to Christianity in AD 312 ended Roman persecution of Christians and began imperial patronage of the Christian churches. But Christianity did not become the Roman Empire’s official religion overnight. Dr David Gwynn, lecturer in ancient and late antique history at Royal Holloway, University of London, says that, alongside Christian and other pagan festivals, ‘the Saturnalia continued to be celebrated in the century afterward’.
The poet Ambrosius Theodosius Macrobius wrote another Saturnalia, describing a banquet of pagan literary celebrities in Rome during the festival. Classicists date the work to between AD 383 and 430, so it describes a Saturnalia alive and well under Christian emperors. The Christian calendar of Polemius Silvus, written around AD 449, mentions Saturnalia, recording that ‘it used to honour the god Saturn’. This suggests it had by then become just another popular carnival.
Christmas apparently started – like Saturnalia – in Rome, and spread to the eastern Mediterranean. The earliest known reference to it commemorating the birth of Christ on December 25th is in the Roman Philocalian calendar of AD 354. Provincial schisms soon resulted in different Christian calendars. The Orthodox Church in the Eastern (Byzantine) half of the Roman Empire fixed the date of Christmas at January 6th, commemorating simultaneously Christ’s birth, baptism and first miracle.
Saturnalia has a rival contender as the forerunner of Christmas: the festival of dies natalis solis invicti, ‘birthday of the unconquered sun’. The Philocalian calendar also states that December 25th was a Roman civil holiday honouring the cult of sol invicta. With its origins in Syria and the monotheistic cult of Mithras, sol invicta certainly has similarities to the worship of Jesus. The cult was introduced into the empire in AD 274 by Emperor Aurelian (214-275), who effectively made it a state religion, putting its emblem on Roman coins.
Sol invicta succeeded because of its ability to assimilate aspects of Jupiter and other deities into its figure of the Sun King, reflecting the absolute power of ‘divine’emperors. But despite efforts by later pagan emperors to control Saturnalia and absorb the festival into the official cult, the sol invicta ended up looking very much like the old Saturnalia. Constantine, the first Christian emperor, was brought up in the sol invicta cult, in what was by then already a predominantly monotheist empire: ‘It is therefore possible,’ says Dr Gwynn, ‘that Christmas was intended to replace this festival rather than Saturnalia.’
Gwynn concludes: ‘The majority of modern scholars would be reluctant to accept any close connection between the Saturnalia and the emergence of the Christian Christmas.’
Devout Christians will be reassured to learn that the date of Christmas may derive from concepts in Judaism that link the time of the deaths of prophets being linked to their conception or birth. From this, early ecclesiastical number-crunchers extrapolated that the nine months of Mary’s pregnancy following the Annunciation on March 25th would produce a December 25th date for the birth of Christ."
http://www.historyto...nvent-christmas

I see your Matt Salusbury and raise you a Paul S. Taylor:

What are some of the most common misconceptions about Jesus Christ’s birth?



Why do many Christians celebrate Christmas on the 25th of December, if that is not when he was born?


The date was chosen by the Roman Catholic Church. Because Rome dominated most of the “Christian” world for centuries, the date became tradition throughout most of Christendom.


The original significance of December 25 is that it was a well-known festival day celebrating the annual return of the sun. December 21 is the winter solstice (shortest day of the year and thus a key date on the calendar), and December 25 is the first day that ancients could clearly note that the days were definitely getting longer and the sunlight was returning.


So, why was December 25 chosen to remember Jesus Christ’s birth with a mass (or Communion supper)? Since no one knows the day of his birth, the Roman Catholic Church felt free to chose this date. The Church wished to replace the pagan festival with a Christian holy day (holiday). The psychology was that is easier to take away an unholy (but traditional) festival from the population, when you can replace it with a good one. Otherwise, the Church would have left a void where there was a long-standing tradition, and risked producing a discontented population and a rapid return to the old ways.

http://www.christiananswers.net/christmas/mythsaboutchristmas.html
  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#66 Shift-4

Shift-4

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,452 posts
  • Joined: 11-August 06

Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:57 PM

On a side note, they start playing Christmas tunes in Sept in the Philippines. :shock:


You just reminded me of Felix, Navy Dad
I freaking hate that one.
  • 1
Hockey is the only sport, the rest are just games.

#67 Heretic

Heretic

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,906 posts
  • Joined: 08-April 07

Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:58 PM

What's really ironic, is that those who hate Christians and are opposed to "Christmas" should be in fact embracing "Christmas".

Why? As others have said, it's just a way the powers that be at the time got their beliefs to coincide with the Christians ones.
In other words, like everything the great deceiver does, it's a lie.
"Celebrating Jesus' birthday is a subtle trick of Satan to get God's people to focus on Jesus' humanity rather than His deity."
So...if you're anti Christian, you should be pro Christmas - not against it.
  • 1

McCoy: We were speculating. Is God really out there?
Kirk: Maybe he's not out there, Bones. Maybe he's right here. [points to his heart]

Posted Image


#68 Heretic

Heretic

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,906 posts
  • Joined: 08-April 07

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:00 PM

I see your Matt Salusbury and raise you a Paul S. Taylor:

What are some of the most common misconceptions about Jesus Christ’s birth?



Why do many Christians celebrate Christmas on the 25th of December, if that is not when he was born?


The date was chosen by the Roman Catholic Church. Because Rome dominated most of the “Christian” world for centuries, the date became tradition throughout most of Christendom.


The original significance of December 25 is that it was a well-known festival day celebrating the annual return of the sun. December 21 is the winter solstice (shortest day of the year and thus a key date on the calendar), and December 25 is the first day that ancients could clearly note that the days were definitely getting longer and the sunlight was returning.


So, why was December 25 chosen to remember Jesus Christ’s birth with a mass (or Communion supper)? Since no one knows the day of his birth, the Roman Catholic Church felt free to chose this date. The Church wished to replace the pagan festival with a Christian holy day (holiday). The psychology was that is easier to take away an unholy (but traditional) festival from the population, when you can replace it with a good one. Otherwise, the Church would have left a void where there was a long-standing tradition, and risked producing a discontented population and a rapid return to the old ways.

http://www.christian...tchristmas.html



I guess you have a hard time reading...I said I believe Jesus wasn't born on December 25th.
  • 0

McCoy: We were speculating. Is God really out there?
Kirk: Maybe he's not out there, Bones. Maybe he's right here. [points to his heart]

Posted Image


#69 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:10 PM

I guess you have a hard time reading...I said I believe Jesus wasn't born on December 25th.

So you agree that a fraud has been practised by the Christian Church. Good to see you are learning.

The marketing of the Christian religion would light the way for the PR industry that would follow centuries later and like the Christian Church would often make things up as they went along. Sell the sizzle not the steak.

The birth of Jesus on December 25 is told in the gospel of … No, it would seem, the date of Jesus’ birth is not marked in the gospels. A splinter group of Christians in Egypt celebrated his birth on January 6. That is until it was established in 375 AD at Antioch that the birth of Christ occurred on December 25. 375 AD? Antioch? It was through the Church of Antioch that Christianity was organised as a religion. The Roman Emperor Caesar Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus, or Constantine for short, inaugurated this change by adopting Christianity as the official religion of the Roman Empire.

The synods established in the wake of Constantine’s conversion discovered, usefully, that the Bible was only a starting point. The message was there, but it needed more structure, something that would make it speak to the people. It also needed more bureaucracy, a thing at which the Empire excelled. The synods were in effect run by advertising executives who would raise Christianity from the status of cult to that of Organised Religion.

The establishment of the Christian religion throughout the Empire was the great marketing challenge of the fourth century. What could be done with a heathen people stepped in the traditions of Mithra, Adonis, Attis, and a whole host of deities who were, it was eventually decided, Satan in disguise? Jesus may be the junior deity, the Church conceded, but that is only because Satan had been hard at work inverting the Truth that Christianity revealed. This argument was not sufficient to quell the heathen superstitions. What could be done?

It was the venerable Bede who noted in The History of the English Church and People that miracles were an absolute necessity when bringing a religion to the masses. Once the message was established, he continued, there would be no need for miracles. In other words, it is not faith but a subtle combination of superstition and fear that are key factors in establishing a major religion. The age of Bede was thus one of hands-on marketing, and persuading the pastoral folk that their ways were not The Way. This involved a certain amount of creative thinking and the hijacking of key dates in the calendar.

The winter solstice celebrated on December 25 was a key date in the pagan calendar. It was understood to be the Nativity of the Sun, the turning point of the year that saw the power of the Sun on the rise again. The new Christians therefore appropriated it for their purposes. “Thus it was,” notes JG Frazer in his magisterial study of magic and religion, The Golden Bough, “that the Christian Church chose to celebrate the birth of its Founder on the twenty-fifth of December in order to transfer the devotion of the heathen from the Sun to him who was called the Sun of Righteousness.”

So just more myth, magic and fables. Coupled with stealing (or co-opting if you prefer that term) pagan holidays.

Follow the light of the word... plug in with BC Hydro.

Edited by Wetcoaster, 10 December 2012 - 04:17 PM.

  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#70 Jai604

Jai604

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,039 posts
  • Joined: 14-October 10

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:17 PM

If all these immigrants are offended by Christmas, I'll drive them to the airport myself.


Good job being a racist, bigoted douche.

So Canadians born here can't prefer the term "Happy Holidays"? Only immigrants?
  • 2

RIP LB RR PD


#71 Heretic

Heretic

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,906 posts
  • Joined: 08-April 07

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:18 PM

So you agree that a fraud has been practised by the Christian Church. Good to see you are learning.

The marketing of the Christian religion would light the way for the PR industry that would follow centuries later and like the Chrsitian Church would often make things up as they went along. Sell the sizzle not the steak.

The birth of Jesus on December 25 is told in the gospel of … No, it would seem, the date of Jesus’ birth is not marked in the gospels. A splinter group of Christians in Egypt celebrated his birth on January 6. That is until it was established in 375 AD at Antioch that the birth of Christ occurred on December 25. 375 AD? Antioch? It was through the Church of Antioch that Christianity was organised as a religion. The Roman Emperor Caesar Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus, or Constantine for short, inaugurated this change by adopting Christianity as the official religion of the Roman Empire.

The synods established in the wake of Constantine’s conversion discovered, usefully, that the Bible was only a starting point. The message was there, but it needed more structure, something that would make it speak to the people. It also needed more bureaucracy, a thing at which the Empire excelled. The synods were in effect run by advertising executives who would raise Christianity from the status of cult to that of Organised Religion.

The establishment of the Christian religion throughout the Empire was the great marketing challenge of the fourth century. What could be done with a heathen people stepped in the traditions of Mithra, Adonis, Attis, and a whole host of deities who were, it was eventually decided, Satan in disguise? Jesus may be the junior deity, the Church conceded, but that is only because Satan had been hard at work inverting the Truth that Christianity revealed. This argument was not sufficient to quell the heathen superstitions. What could be done?

It was the venerable Bede who noted in The History of the English Church and People that miracles were an absolute necessity when bringing a religion to the masses. Once the message was established, he continued, there would be no need for miracles. In other words, it is not faith but a subtle combination of superstition and fear that are key factors in establishing a major religion. The age of Bede was thus one of hands-on marketing, and persuading the pastoral folk that their ways were not The Way. This involved a certain amount of creative thinking and the hijacking of key dates in the calendar.

The winter solstice celebrated on December 25 was a key date in the pagan calendar. It was understood to be the Nativity of the Sun, the turning point of the year that saw the power of the Sun on the rise again. The new Christians therefore appropriated it for their purposes. “Thus it was,” notes JG Frazer in his magisterial study of magic and religion, The Golden Bough, “that the Christian Church chose to celebrate the birth of its Founder on the twenty-fifth of December in order to transfer the devotion of the heathen from the Sun to him who was called the Sun of Righteousness.”

So just more myth, magic and fables. Coupled with stealing (or co-opting if you prefer that term) pagan holidays.

Follow the light of the word... plug in with BC Hydro.


Wrong - I didn't say anything about the Church being a fraud, I said the Romans are the ones that committed "fraud" if you are looking to blame.

Yes...satan is great at making believers and non believers believe in what he wants, not what God wants.
  • 3

McCoy: We were speculating. Is God really out there?
Kirk: Maybe he's not out there, Bones. Maybe he's right here. [points to his heart]

Posted Image


#72 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:26 PM

Wrong - I didn't say anything about the Church being a fraud, I said the Romans are the ones that committed "fraud" if you are looking to blame.

Yes...satan is great at making believers and non believers believe in what he wants, not what God wants.

Then you have missed the point yet again. Much like your illogical pastor, your Christian apologists seem to ignore reality and logic.
  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#73 Buddhas Hand

Buddhas Hand

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,226 posts
  • Joined: 19-December 11

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:35 PM

Wrong - I didn't say anything about the Church being a fraud, I said the Romans are the ones that committed "fraud" if you are looking to blame.

Yes...satan is great at making believers and non believers believe in what he wants, not what God wants.

How can a mythological figure make people do anything ,people choose to act in a certain way ,take responsibility for your actions .
  • 3

The Real war is not between the east and the west. The real war is between intelligent and stupid people.

Marjane Satrapi

tony-abbott-and-stephen-harper-custom-da

That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons that history has to teach.

Aldous Huxley.


#74 Tortorella's Rant

Tortorella's Rant

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,365 posts
  • Joined: 11-April 12

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:38 PM

Apologists ignoring reality and logic? Nnnnno wai, bro.
  • 0
Posted Image

#75 TOMapleLaughs

TOMapleLaughs

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,533 posts
  • Joined: 19-September 05

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:40 PM

Jesus Christ is true God and true man. He was conceived by the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He died upon the cross, the Just for the unjust, as a substitutionary sacrifice, and all who believe in Him are justified on the ground of His shed blood. He arose from the dead according to the Scriptures. He is now at the right hand of the Majesty on high as our great High Priest. He will come again to establish His kingdom of righteousness and peace.

The second coming of the Lord Jesus Christ is imminent and will be personal and visible. As the believer’s blessed hope, this vital truth is an incentive for holy living and sacrificial service toward the completion of Christ's commission.

•We give priority to world evangelization.
•We give priority in our missionary activity to evangelizing those people who have had the least opportunity to hear the gospel, thus expediting the return of Christ.

This is from the church which Stephen Harper attends. Goddamn rights he's pro-Jesus. Jesus is coming back, soon apparently, and he wants us all to get ready, yo.


Harper belongs to the Christian and Missionary Alliance Church, an evangelical Protestant movement that was founded in the United States in the late 19th century and has since crystallized into a denomination. The church believes the free market is divinely inspired and views science and environmentalism with what might be called scorn. There has been speculation why seemingly level-headed Harper at times ditches science and reason in favourable of a more 'faithful' approach to governmental decisions regarding science and environmentalism.

Much has been made of the government’s muzzling of the science community, its low regard for statistics, its hard line against environmentalists.

Because Stephen Harper otherwise appears to be a clear-headed rationalist, there is some wonder about the motivation for these impulses, including the question of whether they are triggered by his evangelical beliefs. The Prime Minister is a member of the Alliance Church, more specifically the Christian and Missionary Alliance.

Alberta journalist and author Andrew Nikiforuk, a Governor-General’s award winner, sees the evangelical creed as being at the root of much of Conservative policy-making in these areas – religion is trumping reason, he says. Mr. Nikiforuk is a conservationist and a Christian social conservative who has spent “many pleasant hours in a variety of evangelical churches and fundamentalist communities.” He recently wrote an analysis for The Tyee, British Columbia’s outstanding online newspaper, which garnered a huge response. Under the headline “Understanding Harper’s Evangelical Mission,” the article carries a subtitle reading, “Signs mount that Canada’s government is beholden to a religious agenda averse to science and rational debate.”

Mr. Harper is quiet on the issue of his religion, and the media have mostly steered clear of the subject. After all, religion is a personal business. Many of our prime ministers have been of faith, and it has not been in our tradition to pry. (In retrospect, it would have been right for Canadians of the day to know about Mackenzie King’s table-rapping séances and spiritualism – they certainly seemed to affect his policy-making. But Mr. King’s devotion to the deities wasn’t revealed until he was out of office.)

While religious privacy is important, the evangelical movement is not a typical religion when it comes to politics. Its aggressive propagation of social conservatism and biblical fundamentalism has had a significant impact on U.S. politics and presidents such as George W. Bush. In the United States, a politician’s ties to the religious right are fair game – evangelicals represent something like a third of the American population. In Canada, where that number is more like 10 per cent, evangelicals have achieved nowhere near the notoriety, and Mr. Harper, restrained by public opinion, has not pursued a strong social conservative agenda, undercutting the notion that his government is beholden to theocons.

But the Conservatives’ positions on research, statistics, environmental assessment, pipeline opponents, climate change and so on leads many to wonder. In Mr. Nikiforuk’s view, “Republican religious tribalism is now Ottawa’s worldview.” He says Mr. Harper openly sympathizes with, if not endorses, evangelicals’ climate skepticism, their distrust of mainstream science and their view of libertarian economics as God’s will.

Not long after the Conservatives were first elected, Mark Noll, a church historian and one of the most influential evangelicals in the U.S., said he thought many Canadians would be upset to learn about the conservative beliefs of the Christian and Missionary Alliance. “They certainly are far less tolerant than, say, the United Church of Canada.” But the Conservatives’ image has not suffered much, if at all, from the affiliation.

Since Mr. Harper never speaks about his religious beliefs, much of what’s said about them is speculation. Just because he is an evangelical does not necessarily mean he holds to all evangelical teachings or even most of them – just as being Catholic does not necessarily mean one believes a communion wafer is literally the body of Christ. As for intolerant views, there are many religious denominations guilty of the same.

That said, given evangelicals’ strong ties to politics, the subject should not be left unexamined. The Prime Minister is under no obligation to tell anyone about his religious convictions. But if his government’s policy-making in important areas like the environment is being motivated by religious faith at the expense of reason, it is cause for debate.


Not that Harper is an advertised full-blown religious nutbar or anything, but it's interesting how his values and his church's are as one.
  • 1
Posted Image

#76 Jägermeister

Jägermeister

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,964 posts
  • Joined: 24-May 12

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:41 PM

Last year my boss actually told me dress up as Santa for work one day and just walk around and stuff, this year we aren't supposed to do anything like that again.
Not that I care too much but all this PC stuff is getting pretty silly.

Edited by Jägermeister, 10 December 2012 - 04:41 PM.

  • 0
Posted Image

#77 debluvscanucks

debluvscanucks

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Super Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,352 posts
  • Joined: 19-February 08

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:45 PM

I'm with Scotty on this one.
  • 0

Posted Image


#78 Heretic

Heretic

    Canucks All-Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,906 posts
  • Joined: 08-April 07

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:47 PM

Then you have missed the point yet again. Much like your illogical pastor, your Christian apologists seem to ignore reality and logic.


Yet you don't get any points unless they're your own. Right?
I wonder who is really ignoring reality and logic. :emot-parrot:
  • 1

McCoy: We were speculating. Is God really out there?
Kirk: Maybe he's not out there, Bones. Maybe he's right here. [points to his heart]

Posted Image


#79 hudson bay rules

hudson bay rules

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,386 posts
  • Joined: 03-November 10

Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:52 PM

You just reminded me of Felix, Navy Dad
I freaking hate that one.


was wondering what the frack you were on about


  • 0
I love rock and roll, just put another dime in the juice box baby.

#80 Wetcoaster

Wetcoaster

    Canucks Hall-of-Famer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,454 posts
  • Joined: 26-April 04

Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:03 PM

Yet you don't get any points unless they're your own. Right?
I wonder who is really ignoring reality and logic. :emot-parrot:

Seems pretty clear.

I am not the one who believes in an invisible guy in the sky and believes myths and fables based on oral legends and committed to paper centuries after the alleged events and occurrences.

As United Church minister Robert Ripley has pointed out:

Of course the path to creating the canon of Scripture was long and hard. A wide diversity of early Christians quarrelled over their interpretation of Jesus' teachings. The church rejected a Gospel of Peter (yes, the first pope) as unorthodox and kept 1 Timothy, which is widely considered a forgery. The contentious process took over three centuries.

...

(As Catholic Church apologist Micheal) Coren fails to mention that following a malleable oral tradition, and in the absence of original writings, all we have are pieces of copies of copies of copies made over centuries by scribes who made intentional alterations to make the text say what either they wanted it to say, or thought it should say. So much for maintaining the correct word of God.


  • 0
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#81 J.R.

J.R.

    Rainbow Butt Monkey

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,405 posts
  • Joined: 04-July 08

Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:13 PM

I know many Sikh, Chinese and other non-Christian families that "celebrate" Christmas as a family friendly gift giving event. All of them call it Christmas and aren't bothered in the slightest by the festivities they encounter in their new found home.

On a side note, they start playing Christmas tunes in Sept in the Philippines. :shock:


I'm a white atheist of Roman Catholic upbringing and I celebrate Christmas as a family/friend celebration with zero religious crap gumming up the works. We even have a non religious tree-topper (a cone of glittery string) :lol:

..and I have zero problem with people saying Christmas and even use it myself.
  • 0
"Science is like an inoculation against charlatans who would have you believe whatever it is they tell you."
- Neil deGrasse Tyson

Posted ImagePosted Image

#82 J.R.

J.R.

    Rainbow Butt Monkey

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,405 posts
  • Joined: 04-July 08

Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:21 PM

Yet you don't get any points unless they're your own. Right?
I wonder who is really ignoring reality and logic. :emot-parrot:


Do you honestly not see the correlation he's making?

If one of the largest holidays in Christianity is based on lies and pilfered pagan ritual by Romans in the name of Christianity...what does that say for the religion's authenticity/integrity?

Doesn't that imply that it's quite likely that other, large parts of the bible/holidays etc of the religion may be based on lies, pilfered rituals etc that happened to be convenient for others in power at the time?

Of course not :rolleyes:
  • 0
"Science is like an inoculation against charlatans who would have you believe whatever it is they tell you."
- Neil deGrasse Tyson

Posted ImagePosted Image

#83 Pouria

Pouria

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,933 posts
  • Joined: 25-October 08

Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:30 PM

If all these immigrants are offended by Christmas, I'll drive them to the airport myself.


I doubt any immigrants are offended by Christmas. In fact they celebrate Christmas even if it isn't part of their religion or culture.
  • 0

Posted Image


#84 Drybone

Drybone

    Canucks Prospect

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,403 posts
  • Joined: 01-July 12

Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:19 PM

I think the time for kicking Heretic when he is down has passed.

The point that Christmas was not the day Jesus was born is duly noted. Christians still have the right to celebrate that day. They have used the only date they know, the Roman date, as the day to celebrate it.

There is nothing wrong with that.
  • 2
Posted Image

#85 KoreanHockeyFan

KoreanHockeyFan

    Canucks Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,553 posts
  • Joined: 04-January 07

Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:32 PM

Oh my god, who the hell cares. It's just a greeting and everyone is getting all riled up over it.

"A War on Christmas," seriously? This crap comes up every damn year. It's just another sensationalist attempt by the mainstream media in order to increase viewership. Christmas is Christmas for some, and for others it's a holiday. End of story. There is nothing more to it, and for sure there is no damn "war" around it.

For those Christians who believe the sacred day of Christmas is dying out and is under attack, it's not. You're still allowed to go to church before and during Christmas to participate in a service, and you're allowed to have a Christmas dinner at home with friends and family. In fact, Christmas has been growing every year with all the ornaments, decorations around people's houses, in malls, and our outrageous Christmas shopping that takes place in November for some.

For those Atheists who are offended by the phrase "Merry Christmas," people are just saying that greet you, there's no religious imposition behind it. Quit your whining and stop nit-picking at trivial things.

/rant.

Edited by KoreanHockeyFan, 10 December 2012 - 06:33 PM.

  • 1

#86 Squirrels.Gone.Wild

Squirrels.Gone.Wild

    Comets Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 432 posts
  • Joined: 16-July 09

Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:39 PM

Posted Image

Personally, I think anyone who is offended by "Happy Holidays" or "Merry Christmas" is an asshole. Go find something more worthy of being offended by.

Edited by Squirrels.Gone.Wild, 10 December 2012 - 07:02 PM.

  • 0

#87 hudson bay rules

hudson bay rules

    Canucks Second-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,386 posts
  • Joined: 03-November 10

Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:43 PM

Correct me if I'm wrong but it's the atheists that are against public Christmas celebrations rather than the Muslims, Sikhs Buddhists etc? Right?
  • 1
I love rock and roll, just put another dime in the juice box baby.

#88 Kamero89

Kamero89

    Comets Star

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 790 posts
  • Joined: 14-February 12

Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:44 PM

*
POPULAR

If all these immigrants are offended by Christmas, I'll drive them to the airport myself.

Most immigrants celebrate Christmas...

No one thinks you are dumb Westcoaster, but a lot of people can see you post to get people to see your own personal political agenda. You are really no different than Fox News. You put your own opinion on everything, and only cover one specific view of everything.

It is mainly the media who ham up this "war". The percentage of people who complain is REALLY small.
  • 5

#89 Jägermeister

Jägermeister

    Canucks First-Line

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,964 posts
  • Joined: 24-May 12

Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:53 PM

If an occasion can be switched for such a random term as "holiday", then what about (as mentioned) "Hanukkah", "Remembrance Day", or "Halloween"?

I'm certain you could find someone who experienced traumatic scares as children and so they are strongly averse to getting scared during Halloween.


Halloween has actually been changed to "Black and Orange Spirit Day" in Toronto schools.

The school board has outlined six reasons why Halloween had to be changed for this school term.

1. “Halloween is a religious day of significance for Wiccans and therefore should be treated respectfully.”

2. “Peer and social/media consumer pressures target all children and their families as consumers of costumes, makeup, food products, etc. Many students and their families can feel this socio-economic marginalization keenly.”

3. “The images and icons associated with consumer-oriented Halloween can come into conflict with some students’ and their families’ religious beliefs.”

4. “The food products that are marketed heavily during the Halloween period can come into conflict with students’ and their families’ dietary habits.”

5. “Some students have had first-hand traumatic experiences of violence that make talking about death, ghosts, etc., extremely alienating.”

6. “Many recently arrived students in our schools share no background cultural knowledge of trick-or-treating or the commercialization of death as ‘fun.’”


Edited by Jägermeister, 10 December 2012 - 06:53 PM.

  • 0
Posted Image

#90 Armada

Armada

    Canucks Franchise Player

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,071 posts
  • Joined: 03-February 08

Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:55 PM

Alright...

So there's actually s*** going on in the world right now that actually matters and then there's this news.

For crying out loud who cares?

People... :picard:

Edited by Armada, 10 December 2012 - 06:55 PM.

  • 0
Posted Image
______________Eat, Sleep,Posted ImageRave, Repeat




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Canucks.com is the official Web site of The Vancouver Canucks. The Vancouver Canucks and Canucks.com are trademarks of The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership.  NHL and the word mark and image of the Stanley Cup are registered trademarks and the NHL Shield and NHL Conference logos are trademarks of the National Hockey League. All NHL logos and marks and NHL team logos and marks as well as all other proprietary materials depicted herein are the property of the NHL and the respective NHL teams and may not be reproduced without the prior written consent of NHL Enterprises, L.P.  Copyright © 2009 The Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership and the National Hockey League.  All Rights Reserved.