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Cpt.Clutch

Port man is closed

48 posts in this topic

So halt the construction and tie up the company in litigation. Sounds like a perfectly good plan. The way I see it you actually end up with more lanes if you do it my way.

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Depends on the contract.

Either way, when public safety is an issue, action is usually immediate.

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I suspect that some sortof steel mesh will be affixed directly underneath the freezing points in question, then whatever falls off will be caught so it can melt.

Either that or the shape of whatever is catching the ice will be changed so it can't accumulate.

Worst case they'd run electric heat up there to keep it from freezing up during these times.

All solutions aren't great to work on, given the location. Hope for non-freezing weather in the meantime.

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Depends on the contract.

Either way, when public safety is an issue, action is usually immediate.

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I thought it was cause the highway after the Brunette onramp was flooded.

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Just watching this on CTV news right now.

Scary s***!

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Er, i meant fixing the problem.

Getting lawyers involved, as usual, just adds to the problem.

If only lawyers were more like engineers.

^^ I don't think electric heat would be ultra-costly, as it won't be needed often. But that probably won't be required.

The option of simply letting the ice fall and then deal with the litigation isn't even on the table.

It was. They immediately closed the bridge. When the ice is melted they will no doubt open it up.

You can bet the lawyers will be picking over the contract with a fine tooth comb.

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Man what a gong show eh? Seems like such an oversight. How can they have not checked to ensure that the bridge could handle cold temperatures and falling snow?

Sounds like it was a commuter's worst nightmare being on the roads today.

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The easiest way to solve this issue is to leave the other bridge standing. so it can be used in cases of emergency. Set up a system that makes it still work

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Sounds like it was a commuter's worst nightmare being on the roads today.

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$$$$

What costs more? Paying for claims due to damage and delays or putting in an electric heating system?

If either turns out to be more than "not much" (don't count on it) than you can expect lawyers to argue over what the actual terms were in the contract. I doubt "prevent ice and snow from falling on the travelled path" is in even the fine print....

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Er, i meant fixing the problem.

Getting lawyers involved, as usual, just adds to the problem.

If only lawyers were more like engineers.

^^ I don't think electric heat would be ultra-costly, as it won't be needed often. But that probably won't be required.

The option of simply letting the ice fall and then deal with the litigation isn't even on the table.

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They won't be arguing over claims on vehicles if someone gets seriously injured or killed by falling ice.

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This was an unreasonable oversight. Vancouver's not likely to get any temperatures under -10, so the cold precipitation we'll get is packing snow, freezing rain and hail. Every time the city had snowfall, rain followed. The result that we always get is ice and slush. They should have seen this coming.

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Ice chunks have been known to fall from that bridge as well in similar conditions. Lets face it, it was a freak storm. Many bridges have had the same issues across the world.

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They are saying they followed the Canadian bridge code to the "T".

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Add Christmas lights to the structures that accumulate ice

your welcome

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