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Are you happy with your master's degree?


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#31 inane

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 01:10 PM

Only 8.6% of Canadians--2.98 million--have a four year university level bachelor's degree.http://www.statcan.g...educ43a-eng.htm. In the US, that figure is north of 30%, and 7.6% with master's degrees.


Well, I was doing interviews for an entry level position in October. We had about 200 applications, 12 had a phd and about half a masters. Everyone had a BA.

In the professional world, a BA is what a high school diploma was in the 80's-90's.
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#32 hockeyville88

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 01:24 PM

Teaching doesn't get the respect it deserves. So i hope you accomplish your goal.

Agreed. In the case of grade school I think the lack of respect might be related to the fact that not many of the teachers are passionate about what they're doing. At least, that was the case when I was there. It was just a job to them and they didn't really take pride in it.

In university though, the biggest difference was that my profs really loved what they were teaching about and they took a lot of pride in transferring that knowledge and interest in the field and in the subject over to us. I gained a lot of respect for my profs for their knowledge, accomplishments, and for just the fact that they liked that they did.
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#33 literaphile

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 02:38 PM

You have to article for 9 months before you can write the bar in Canada.


That's not entirely accurate - it depends on the province you're articling in. The law society for each province determines how the articling and bar process works.

In BC, there's no "bar exam" as such, but a 10-week course called the PLTC (professional legal training course). You can take the PLTC at any time during your articles - right at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end. It's up to you and (more importantly) the firm you're articling with.
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#34 jmfaminoff

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 08:19 PM

Well, I was doing interviews for an entry level position in October. We had about 200 applications, 12 had a phd and about half a masters. Everyone had a BA.

In the professional world, a BA is what a high school diploma was in the 80's-90's.

As for your company, I do not know what field you are in. To me, receiving 200 applicants seems to be an HRIS problem. We do not conduct HR like we did in the 1980s and 80s. Anyone can fill an application online. Unless it is a specialized position that was well advertised or that you work for such a prestigious company, most of those applicants are entertaining fantasies and are not serious about working at your company. The fact is HRIS does not discern an applicant's motivation.

I would not generalize that a BA is equivalent to the high school diploma of the 1990s, but an associates degree might be. One reason is that some high schools now offer dual credit and/or advanced placement opportunities. However, in academia, there are questions as to whether these programs adequately prepare students for university.

Two other issues are social promotion and grade inflation--I was a victim of that. I had decent grades in high school and I thought I was a good student. I earned a 1.41 GPA my freshman year of university and was given a time-out. After maturing and gaining life experience I went back and graduated with honors. After my first year of grad school I had a 4.0, but I have slacked off a bit this year so my GPA is down to 3.9. I just hope I do well on my thesis later this spring.
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#35 inane

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 09:02 PM

As for your company, I do not know what field you are in. To me, receiving 200 applicants seems to be an HRIS problem. We do not conduct HR like we did in the 1980s and 80s. Anyone can fill an application online. Unless it is a specialized position that was well advertised or that you work for such a prestigious company, most of those applicants are entertaining fantasies and are not serious about working at your company. The fact is HRIS does not discern an applicant's motivation.

I would not generalize that a BA is equivalent to the high school diploma of the 1990s, but an associates degree might be. One reason is that some high schools now offer dual credit and/or advanced placement opportunities. However, in academia, there are questions as to whether these programs adequately prepare students for university.

Two other issues are social promotion and grade inflation--I was a victim of that. I had decent grades in high school and I thought I was a good student. I earned a 1.41 GPA my freshman year of university and was given a time-out. After maturing and gaining life experience I went back and graduated with honors. After my first year of grad school I had a 4.0, but I have slacked off a bit this year so my GPA is down to 3.9. I just hope I do well on my thesis later this spring.


Well we didn't look at them all, just the hr department told us that. We didn't want anyone with a masters or phd. Point though, that a ba was just common and in no way made them stand out.

As for grades, in the real world,no one gives a damn. I have no idea what any of my employees or colleagues got for marks in any course or test or overall gpa. Totally irrelevant. Real world experience and the ability to think on you feet trumps any test score or grade every time.
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#36 Mainly Mattias

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 12:37 AM

Well we didn't look at them all, just the hr department told us that. We didn't want anyone with a masters or phd. Point though, that a ba was just common and in no way made them stand out.

As for grades, in the real world,no one gives a damn. I have no idea what any of my employees or colleagues got for marks in any course or test or overall gpa. Totally irrelevant. Real world experience and the ability to think on you feet trumps any test score or grade every time.

I keep telling my students that but they still are focused on memorizing and marks rather than comprehension.

Mind you, some employers have been requesting transcripts so as to use that as another method of weeding down the numbers..
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#37 :D

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 12:47 AM

C's get degrees, pals.
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#38 Down by the River

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:42 AM

Finished my MA last Spring and started my PhD Fall 2012. I can say that I am happy with my MA, but only because it was necessary to do my PhD. In many fields, an MA is absolutely useless unless you are wanting to go on to get a PhD. This is particularly true if you are interested in taking the academic route. When I started my MA, I knew that I was going to go on to do a PhD. I would never have started grad school with the end goal of getting an MA. Law School would have been a better route.

I'm doing my PhD in Criminology.
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God dammit Benning. WHY VIRTANEN? Terrible move.

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#39 jmfaminoff

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:50 AM

I keep telling my students that but they still are focused on memorizing and marks rather than comprehension.

Mind you, some employers have been requesting transcripts so as to use that as another method of weeding down the numbers..

Interpersonal skills are so important. Being able to work with people, knowing how to listen, and contributing to a team are vital. It is hard to teach those things, because you have to have students that are willing.

Some jobs require expertise. There are reasons why the majority of CEOs have MBAs and finance backgrounds. Looking at a candidate's transcript might be helpful.

My finance professor told us a story about going to a car dealership to buy a car-- he has a PhD in Finance. The price was agreed on the car, and then they went to finance it. The financing manager ran the numbers and then quoted him a certain price.

So he asked the guy, "How did you come to those numbers?" The manager replied, "I do not know, that is what the computer tells me it is."

The problem was that those numbers were off. Prof pulled out his BA-II Plus, ran the numbers, and the difference was about five dollars a month--almost 250 over the life of the loan.

Could you imagine making that mistake over hundreds of loans each year? That adds up to some serious cash.
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