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[Report] Lance Armstrong may confess to using Steroids.


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#1 WHL rocks

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 01:18 AM

After years of denials and swearing up and down that he never took Performance Enhancing Drugs according to reports Lance Armstrong is considering admitting to using them.

Apparently Armstrong thinks that if he comes out and admits to using PED's he would be able to carry on his career as a triathlete.

http://espn.go.com/s...enhancing-drugs

What a clown this guy is. I never doubted this idiot did use PED's but there were millions of ppl out there who believed this guy's lies and defended him.


Lance Armstrong may confess

AUSTIN, Texas -- Lance Armstrong, who has strongly denied the doping charges that led to him being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, has told associates he is considering admitting to the use of performance-enhancing drugs, The New York Times reported Friday.

The report cited anonymous sources and said Armstrong was considering a confession to help restore his athletic career in triathlons and running events at age 41. Armstrong has been banned for life from competing in sporting events governed by the World Anti-Doping Agency code.



Posted ImageArmstrong
Yet Armstrong attorney Tim Herman denied that Armstrong has reached out to U.S. Anti-Doping Agency chief executive Travis Tygart and David Howman, director general of the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Herman told The Associated Press he had no knowledge of Armstrong considering a confession and said: "When, and if, Lance has something to say, there won't be any secret about it."

Howman, reached while vacationing in New Zealand, told ESPN.com he has not been approached by Armstrong or his representatives, but added, "I would be open to any discussions. Never say never … I'm prepared to listen to anybody."

Howman said USADA, not WADA, would have the authority to decide whether or not to re-open the case if Armstrong were to present new information. "It's (USADA's) issue, although they could come to us to ask for guidance or advice," he said.
Speaking in general terms and not specifically about the Armstrong case, Howman said that new information that might merit revisiting a case could pertain to the individual defendant or shed light on others involved in doping offenses. He said there is precedent for cases to be re-opened and it would be "nonsensical" to close off that possibility.

The WADA code provides for reduced penalties in instances where athletes provide "substantial assistance" in resolving other doping cases. Howman did not want to speculate on the impact of a potential Armstrong confession, saying only, "This is such a significant case with so many issues, and it has had a considerable effect not only on the sport of cycling but the world sports scene itself."
Armstrong's trainer Michele Ferrari and former U.S. Postal Service cycling team physician Luis Garcia del Moral did not contest USADA's cases against them and also received lifetime bans, but longtime team director Johan Bruyneel asked for arbitration and his case is still pending.
Evidence that surfaced in USADA's case against Armstrong also prompted an ongoing independent review of the UCI, cycling's international governing body.
Armstrong, who recovered from testicular cancer that had spread to his lungs and brain, won the Tour de France each year from 1999 to 2005. Although he has vehemently denied doping, Armstrong's athletic career crumbled under the weight of a massive report by USADA detailing allegations of drug use by Armstrong and his teammates on his U.S. Postal Service teams.
The report caused Armstrong to lose most of his personal corporate sponsors, and he recently stepped down from the board of Livestrong, the cancer-fighting charity he founded in 1997.
Armstrong is facing other legal hurdles.
The U.S. Department of Justice is considering whether to join a federal whistle-blower lawsuit filed by former Armstrong teammate Floyd Landis. A Dallas-based promotions company also has said it wants to recover several million dollars paid to Armstrong in bonuses for winning the Tour de France. The British newspaper The Sunday Times has sued Armstrong to recover $500,000 paid to him to settle a libel lawsuit.


Edited by WHL rocks, 05 January 2013 - 01:24 AM.

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#2 cadillaccts

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 01:23 AM

I think we'd all be shocked if we really knew how many athletes are on ped's of some sort.

Lance's downfall was not admitting to it with so much evidence against him.
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#3 sedated

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:54 AM

I really liked the guy. He did a lot of good. Still did I guess in terms of the good he did.

But he handled this so poorly. He looks like a massive douche now. He tried to crap on so many people about blaming him and tried to drag people through the mud. Now he wants to just admit things like water un the bridge? Kind of outrageous sounding to me, not sure if it's the same to other people.

Worst part is, he lied about all the steroids and talked down on all those people that had reports and negative things to say involving him.. was it all true then? How he really was suppose to be a massive tool in real life, and treated other people like crap? And that he didn't even really like doing the cancer fundraiser stuff?

Disappointing to say the least. But I just find it really hard to take in and process that he'd cause such an uproar defending himself and throwing people under the bus and now just wants to admit it like nothing? I hope he at least apologizes to everyone he let down and crapped on in the process.
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#4 sedated

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:56 AM

I think we'd all be shocked if we really knew how many athletes are on ped's of some sort.

Lance's downfall was not admitting to it with so much evidence against him.


Not really. We're lucky that in hockey at least to our knowledge it seems to be the cleanest sport. But the NFL and MLB have been ripe with the stuff for a long ass time, and it's not like people didn't know it. People just thought really highly of some of the stars so it was kind of surprising to have to look at them as 'cheaters'. But I doubt anyone is surprised of how many of them do it. It's a huge problem in a lot of sports. It was probably worse like a decade or so ago than it is now before they became more aware. Can guarantee that there are some hugely tainted olympic results somewhere.
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#5 WHL rocks

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 11:36 AM

I think we'd all be shocked if we really knew how many athletes are on ped's of some sort.

Lance's downfall was not admitting to it with so much evidence against him.



Not really. We're lucky that in hockey at least to our knowledge it seems to be the cleanest sport. But the NFL and MLB have been ripe with the stuff for a long ass time, and it's not like people didn't know it. People just thought really highly of some of the stars so it was kind of surprising to have to look at them as 'cheaters'. But I doubt anyone is surprised of how many of them do it. It's a huge problem in a lot of sports. It was probably worse like a decade or so ago than it is now before they became more aware. Can guarantee that there are some hugely tainted olympic results somewhere.


Nonetheless its very naive to think hockey players don't use PED's. Hockey is a sport just like others. Take PED's and your "performance" gets "enhanced".
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#6 LeanBeef

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:20 PM

I don't think he has the balls to confess.
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#7 TOMapleLaughs

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:21 PM

Can he take back than holier-than-thou pep talk he gave to Vince Vaughn in Dodgeball?

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Makes OJ's appearances in the Naked Gun series look good again. (Okay, they were always good.)


On the costly lie scale, even Bill Clinton feels sorry for Lance Armstrong.
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#8 SterlingArcher

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 10:08 AM

Meh they stripped away all his titles. Banned him from the sport. At the end of the day he raised a ton of money for cancer research.

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#9 Aladeen

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 10:24 AM

Nonetheless its very naive to think hockey players don't use PED's. Hockey is a sport just like others. Take PED's and your "performance" gets "enhanced".

What about competative swimming? Not that anyone watches it other than the olympics. Just go back and watch Phelps in 2008 in Bejing and tell me that guy wasn't juicing.
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#10 WHL rocks

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 02:18 AM

So apparetly Armstrong is doing a tell all on... wait for this......................Oprah. lmao.

He'll pbbly do a fake I'm sorry, forgive me America, shed a few crocodile tears and start making millions again.


LOS ANGELES — Lance Armstrong has agreed to a tell-all interview with Oprah Winfrey where he will address allegations that he used performance-enhancing drugs during his cycling career.

According to a release posted on Oprah’s website on Tuesday, it’s the first interview with Armstrong since his athletic career crumbled under the weight of a massive report by USADA detailing allegations of drug use by the famous cyclist and teammates on his U.S. Postal Service teams.

It’s unclear if the interview at Armstrong’s home in Austin, Texas, has already been taped.

Nicole Nichols, a spokeswoman for Oprah Winfrey Network & Harpo Studios, declined to comment.

The show will air at 6 p.m. PST on Jan. 17 on OWN and Oprah.com.

Armstrong has strongly denied the doping charges that led to him being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles, but the New York Times reported Friday he has told associates he is considering admitting the use of performance-enhancing drugs.

The newspaper report cited anonymous sources, and Armstrong attorney Tim Herman told the Associated Press that night that he had no knowledge of Armstrong considering a confession.

Earlier Tuesday, 60 Minutes Sports reported that the head of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency told the show a representative for Armstrong offered the agency a “donation” in excess of $150,000 several years before an investigation by the organization led to the loss of Armstrong’s Tour de France titles.

In an interview for the premiere airing on Showtime on Wednesday night, USADA CEO Travis Tygart said he was “stunned” when he received the offer in 2004.

“It was a clear conflict of interest for USADA,” Tygart said. “We had no hesitation in rejecting that offer.”

Herman denied such an offer was made.

“No truth to that story,” Herman wrote Tuesday in an email to the AP. “First Lance heard of it was today. He never made any such contribution or suggestion.”

Tygart was travelling and did not respond to requests from the AP for comment.

USADA spokeswoman Annie Skinner said Tygart’s comments from the interview were accurate.

In it, he reiterates what he told the AP last fall: That he was surprised when federal investigators abruptly shut down their two-year probe into Armstrong and his business dealings, then refused to share any of the evidence they had gathered.

“You’ll have to ask the feds why they shut down,” Tygart told the AP.

“They enforce federal criminal laws. We enforce sports anti-doping violations. They’re totally separate. We’ve done our job.”




Read more: http://www.theprovin...l#ixzz2HT4IARW2
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#11 Ghostsof1915

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:52 PM

Clearly they need to sick the Spanish Inquisition on him....


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#12 Primus099

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:21 PM

What about competative swimming? Not that anyone watches it other than the olympics. Just go back and watch Phelps in 2008 in Bejing and tell me that guy wasn't juicing.


Phelps is just a freak of nature, just look at the guys body he looks like an alien with his long torso/arms/legs.
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#13 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:49 PM

No pity for this guy, he had many chances to come clean and mitigate the damage to his reputation. Instead, he wanted to be a bully and presume everyone else were oblivious to the prevalence of PED's.

Edited by zaibatsu, 10 January 2013 - 03:51 PM.

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#14 WHL rocks

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 01:27 PM

(CNN) -- The court of public opinion weighed in decidedly against Lance Armstrong, even before the broadcast of an interview in which he is said to acknowledge using performance-enhancing drugsafter years of denials.
On CNN's Facebook page, the opinions were passionate and pointed.
"This guy is a loser and a liar!!" Melinda Morgan said. "He is not sorry for what he did, he is sorry that he got caught!!"
Margaret Midkiff said there's no hope of Armstrong reviving his career. "He's lied to folks way too long."
For more than a decade, Armstrong has denied he used performance-enhancing drugs, but he was linked to a doping scandal by nearly a dozen other former cyclists who have admitted to doping.
But Oprah Winfrey appeared to confirm Tuesday on "CBS This Morning" that Armstrong acknowledges having used performance-enhancing drugs in the interview which will air across two nights.
After CBS, like other media, reported that Armstrong admitted using banned substances, Winfrey said she was surprised to see that not long after the interview, news of what he said had "already been confirmed."
Winfrey did not describe Armstrong's statements in detail, and has not released clips or quotes.
She said the former cyclist was forthcoming in an exhausting and intense interview taped in Armstrong's hometown of Austin, Texas.
"We were mesmerized and riveted by some of his answers," she said, adding that "he did not come clean in the manner that I expected." She didn't elaborate.
Some media outlets have reported that Armstrong has been strongly considering the possibility of a confession, possibly as a way to stem the tide of fleeing sponsors and as part of a long-term comeback plan.
Cycling fan and CNN iReporter Beverlee Ring said she has "mixed feelings" about the Winfrey interview.
He should apologize and do whatever it takes to begin the healing," she said. "Now is when the real work begins for Lance."
But Gretta Michellé said it's too late for redemption.
"He had the opportunity to be honest from the beginning and he should have," she posted on the Facebook page. "Winning was more important."
Sources: Armstrong says he used steroids
Armstrong's admission is a sharp about-face after more than a decade of vehemently denying he cheated en route to winning a record seven Tour de France titles. Cycling's international governing body, the UCI, stripped the titles from Armstrong following a report by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency that found widespread evidence of Armstrong's involvement in a sophisticated doping program.
The interview will air over two nights, beginning at 9 p.m. ET Thursday on the Oprah Winfrey Network. Winfrey has promised a "no-holds-barred" interview, with no conditions and no payment made to Armstrong.
Read more: Oprah interview with Lance Armstrong airs January 17
"I hope the ratings are (a) record low on that show," Matthew Black said in a Facebook comment.


Posted ImageArmstrong may have to pay back bonuses
Winfrey declined to characterize Armstrong's statements, saying she preferred that viewers make up their own minds. She said the interview was at times emotional and surprisingly intense.
"I would say that he met the moment," she said.
Word that Armstrong may have allowed some emotion to show through didn't seem to soften many critics.
"Go ahead and cry, Lance ... it won't help you one bit," Lori Polacek said. You "blew it a long time ago!"
Cancer charity: The trump card?
Some were willing to cut Armstrong a break because of his long-running cancer charity: the Livestrong Foundation.
"Who cares?" said Pedro Murillo. "He raised so much for cancer research, that's more important (than) if he doped for some races."
<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2...ada/index.html" style="padding: 0px; margin: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: initial; color: rgb(0, 66, 118); outline: 0px;" target="_blank">Armstrong's demise: How an all-American hero fell to earth
David Flowe said he doesn't care if Armstrong was involved in doping or if he even confesses to it.
"The man is an inspiration for those battling cancer," he said. "Quit being so judgmental of others especially someone who has done so much good for the world!"
Armstrong, 41, has been an icon for his cycling feats and celebrity, bringing more status to a sport wildly popular in some nations but lacking big-name recognition, big money and mass appeal in the United States.
He fought back from testicular cancer to win the Tour de France from 1999 to 2005. He raised millions via his Lance Armstrong Foundation to help cancer victims and survivors, an effort illustrated by trendy yellow "LiveSTRONG" wristbands that helped bring in the money.
Before the interview with Winfrey, the disgraced cycling legend apologized to the staff of his cancer charity, a publicist for Livestrong Foundation said.
Armstrong was tearful during the 15-minute meeting and didn't address the issue of steroid use in cycling, said Rae Bazzarre, director of communications for the foundation.
Bazzarre added that Armstrong offered to the staff a "sincere and heartfelt apology for the stress they've endured because of him."
He urged them to keep working hard to help cancer survivors and their families.
Armstrong in talks to return Postal Service money
Banned for life
The USADA hit Armstrong with a lifetime ban after the agency issued a 202-page report in October that said there was overwhelming evidence he was directly involved in a sophisticated doping program.
The report detailed Armstrong's alleged use of performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions. The USADA said it had tested Armstrong fewer than 60 times and the International Cycling Union conducted about 215 tests.
"Show one failed test, just one," Ron Berg said, challenging the wave of public opinion against Armstrong. "You can't, because he passed them all. ... They hate him for his success and tried to fail him, they could not."
The agency did not say that Armstrong ever failed a test, but his former teammates testified as to how they beat tests or avoided them altogether.


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#15 MANGO

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 06:56 PM

I think Lance would have come out earlier if it would have cleaned up the sport. The problem with his confessing is that it would only make him culpable. The real problem is the system (cycling and the UCI). I've got a feeling that this will not be over for many years and hopefully the UCI will get a good lambasting as well. The UCI joining the witch hunt was only brought about by pressure from the USADA, it wasn't on their own accord. I think that the UCI is going to regret joining forces with the USADA. the UCI allowed doping to a certain extent and when the USADA finds this out, that will be the day cycling gets cleaned up. I think Lance knows this and this is part of his plan to get his credibility back as well as cleaning up the sport and repairing any damage to his legacy. In five to ten years it will be.....Lance helps clean up cycling by dropping bombs on the UCI:-)
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#16 NucksPatsFan

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:27 PM

His legacy as someone who raised millions and millions of dollars for cancer > his legacy as a bicycle racer
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#17 SkeeterHansen

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:29 PM

I don't think he has the balls to confess.


:bigblush:
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#18 Tearloch7

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:29 PM

No pity for this guy, he had many chances to come clean and mitigate the damage to his reputation. Instead, he wanted to be a bully and presume everyone else were oblivious to the prevalence of PED's.


A +1 for you, Moriarty .. :ph34r:
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#19 WHL rocks

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:13 PM

I don't like this guy's attitude, his bullying tactics and the fact he's liar. But as far as cheating goes was he really cheating? Everyone in cycling was doping. Was he not evening the playing field?

I have more of a problem with him lying about what he did and suing ppl for telling the truth. Not as much for actually using PED's.
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#20 Captain Aerosex

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 03:04 PM

No pity for this guy, he had many chances to come clean and mitigate the damage to his reputation. Instead, he wanted to be a bully and presume everyone else were oblivious to the prevalence of PED's.


The guy's raised hundreds of millions of dollars for cancer research, and you're mad at him for using PEDs like the hundreds of other guys who ride damn bicycles for a living.

Who the hell are you?
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