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Study - 'Muricans at, or near the bottom, of every health/health service issue


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#1 Wetcoaster

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 09:09 PM

This comprehensive study by the US Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council compared he difference in life expectancy and health measures for people of all ages in the United States and their counterparts in 16 other developed countries. The countries in the analysis included Canada, Japan, Australia, France, Germany and Spain.


U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health


Released: January 9, 2013

Type: Consensus Report

Topics: Public Health, Aging

Activity: Understanding Cross-National Health Differences Among High-Income Countries

Boards: Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education


The United States is among the wealthiest nations in the world, but it is far from the healthiest. For many years, Americans have been dying at younger ages than people in almost all other high-income countries. This health disadvantage prevails even though the U.S. spends far more per person on health care than any other nation. To gain a better understanding of this problem, the NIH asked the National Research Council and the IOM to investigate potential reasons for the U.S. health disadvantage and to assess its larger implications.


No single factor can fully explain the U.S. health disadvantage. It likely has multiple causes and involves some combination of inadequate health care, unhealthy behaviors, adverse economic and social conditions, and environmental factors, as well as public policies and social values that shape those conditions. Without action to reverse current trends, the health of Americans will probably continue to fall behind that of people in other high-income countries. The tragedy is not that the U.S. is losing a contest with other countries, but that Americans are dying and suffering from illness and injury at rates that are demonstrably unnecessary.

http://www.iom.edu/R...rer-Health.aspx


The results were startling across age ranges under 75 but in the US the young die earlier and live in poorer health than their counterparts in other developed countries. This is a reversal of what was found back in the 1950's.

Posted Image

The main difference between the US and other countries being compared - lack of universal health care and the prevalence of firearms. And this is despite the US spending more per capita on health care than the other countries.

As the New York Times reports:


For Americans Under 50, Stark Findings on Health



Younger Americans die earlier and live in poorer health than their counterparts in other developed countries, with far higher rates of death from guns, car accidents and drug addiction, according to a new analysis of health and longevity in the United States.


Researchers have known for some time that the United States fares poorly in comparison with other rich countries, a trend established in the 1980s. But most studies have focused on older ages, when the majority of people die.


The findings were stark. Deaths before age 50 accounted for about two-thirds of the difference in life expectancy between males in the United States and their counterparts in 16 other developed countries, and about one-third of the difference for females. The countries in the analysis included Canada, Japan, Australia, France, Germany and Spain.


The 378-page study by a panel of experts convened by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council is the first to systematically compare death rates and health measures for people of all ages, including American youths. It went further than other studies in documenting the full range of causes of death, from diseases to accidents to violence. It was based on a broad review of mortality and health studies and statistics.


The panel called the pattern of higher rates of disease and shorter lives “the U.S. health disadvantage,” and said it was responsible for dragging the country to the bottom in terms of life expectancy over the past 30 years. American men ranked last in life expectancy among the 17 countries in the study, and American women ranked second to last.


“Something fundamental is going wrong,” said Dr. Steven Woolf, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University, who led the panel. “This is not the product of a particular administration or political party. Something at the core is causing the U.S. to slip behind these other high-income countries. And it’s getting worse.”


Car accidents, gun violence and drug overdoses were major contributors to years of life lost by Americans before age 50.


The rate of firearm homicides was 20 times higher in the United States than in the other countries, according to the report, which cited a 2011 study of 23 countries. And though suicide rates were lower in the United States, firearm suicide rates were six times higher.


Sixty-nine percent of all American homicide deaths in 2007 involved firearms, compared with an average of 26 percent in other countries, the study said. “The bottom line is that we are not preventing damaging health behaviors,” said Samuel Preston, a demographer and sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania, who was on the panel. “You can blame that on public health officials, or on the health care system. No one understands where responsibility lies.”


Panelists were surprised at just how consistently Americans ended up at the bottom of the rankings. The United States had the second-highest death rate from the most common form of heart disease, the kind that causes heart attacks, and the second-highest death rate from lung disease, a legacy of high smoking rates in past decades. American adults also have the highest diabetes rates.


Youths fared no better. The United States has the highest infant mortality rate among these countries, and its young people have the highest rates of sexually transmitted diseases, teen pregnancy and deaths from car crashes. Americans lose more years of life before age 50 to alcohol and drug abuse than people in any of the other countries.


Americans also had the lowest probability over all of surviving to the age of 50. The report’s second chapter details health indicators for youths where the United States ranks near or at the bottom. There are so many that the list takes up four pages. Chronic diseases, including heart disease, also played a role for people under 50.


“We expected to see some bad news and some good news,” Dr. Woolf said. “But the U.S. ranked near and at the bottom in almost every heath indicator. That stunned us.”


There were bright spots. Death rates from cancers that can be detected with tests, like breast cancer, were lower in the United States. Adults had better control over their cholesterol and high blood pressure. And the very oldest Americans — above 75 — tended to outlive their counterparts.


The panel sought to explain the poor performance. It noted the United States has a highly fragmented health care system, with limited primary care resources and a large uninsured population. It has the highest rates of poverty among the countries studied.


Education also played a role. Americans who have not graduated from high school die from diabetes at three times the rate of those with some college, Dr. Woolf said. In the other countries, more generous social safety nets buffer families from the health consequences of poverty, the report said.


Still, even the people most likely to be healthy, like college-educated Americans and those with high incomes, fare worse on many health indicators.


The report also explored less conventional explanations. Could cultural factors like individualism and dislike of government interference play a role? Americans are less likely to wear seat belts and more likely to ride motorcycles without helmets.


The United States is a bigger, more heterogeneous society with greater levels of economic inequality, and comparing its health outcomes to those in countries like Sweden or France may seem lopsided. But the panelists point out that this country spends more on health care than any other in the survey. And as recently as the 1950s, Americans scored better in life expectancy and disease than many of the other countries in the current study.

http://www.nytimes.c...-says.html?_r=0


To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

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#2 Mr.DirtyDangles

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 11:13 PM

Excellent read :) Thanks for posting

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#3 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 11:40 PM

Sixty-nine percent of all American homicide deaths in 2007 involved firearms, compared with an average of 26 percent in other countries, the study said. “The bottom line is that we are not preventing damaging health behaviors,” said Samuel Preston, a demographer and sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania, who was on the panel. “You can blame that on public health officials, or on the health care system. No one understands where responsibility lies.”


You mean damaging health behaviours isn't the fault of a gun? Well damn. That's going to ruin a few convenient, dogmatic gimmicks here on CDC that follow every mass shooting, but rest assured, not going to stop the preachers from their aggrandising.

Edited by zaibatsu, 13 January 2013 - 11:47 PM.


#4 Wetcoaster

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 11:57 PM

[/size]
You mean damaging health behaviours isn't the fault of a gun? Well damn. That's going to ruin a few convenient, dogmatic gimmicks here on CDC that follow every mass shooting, but rest assured, not going to stop the preachers from their aggrandising.

The US public health authorities certainly seem to view this as public health concern.

In fact Harvard University's School of Public Health has a specific faculty known as the Harvard Injury Control Research Center that conducts extensive research and study in firearms, firearm homicides, suicides and injuries as well as gun control.
http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/hicrc/

Edited by Wetcoaster, 14 January 2013 - 12:05 AM.

To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

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Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#5 canuckster19

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 01:02 AM

Too many facts not enough explozeons!
Posted Image
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#6 Tearloch7

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 01:55 AM

Excellent read :) Thanks for posting


I do believe the key word there was "read" .. it was excellent, indeed .. :)

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#7 woofwoofmoomoo

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 02:47 AM

[/size]
You mean damaging health behaviours isn't the fault of a gun? Well damn. That's going to ruin a few convenient, dogmatic gimmicks here on CDC that follow every mass shooting, but rest assured, not going to stop the preachers from their aggrandising.

You mean that empty NRA rhetoric you keep repeating over and over again that isn't true?

#8 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:27 AM

You mean that empty NRA rhetoric you keep repeating over and over again that isn't true? -Guns Are the Devil 3:16

Fixed.

Edited by zaibatsu, 14 January 2013 - 08:28 AM.


#9 Mr. White

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:57 AM

It's because parents feed their kids this instead of water

Posted Image
Posted Image
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#10 Wetcoaster

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:43 AM

It's because parents feed their kids this instead of water

Posted Image

As the study points it that is but one of a number of issues that lead to these outcomes in young people.
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#11 Pouria

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 12:23 PM

This comprehensive study by the US Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council compared he difference in life expectancy and health measures for people of all ages in the United States and their counterparts in 16 other developed countries. The countries in the analysis included Canada, Japan, Australia, France, Germany and Spain.


U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health


Released: January 9, 2013

Type: Consensus Report

Topics: Public Health, Aging

Activity: Understanding Cross-National Health Differences Among High-Income Countries

Boards: Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education


The United States is among the wealthiest nations in the world, but it is far from the healthiest. For many years, Americans have been dying at younger ages than people in almost all other high-income countries. This health disadvantage prevails even though the U.S. spends far more per person on health care than any other nation. To gain a better understanding of this problem, the NIH asked the National Research Council and the IOM to investigate potential reasons for the U.S. health disadvantage and to assess its larger implications.


No single factor can fully explain the U.S. health disadvantage. It likely has multiple causes and involves some combination of inadequate health care, unhealthy behaviors, adverse economic and social conditions, and environmental factors, as well as public policies and social values that shape those conditions. Without action to reverse current trends, the health of Americans will probably continue to fall behind that of people in other high-income countries. The tragedy is not that the U.S. is losing a contest with other countries, but that Americans are dying and suffering from illness and injury at rates that are demonstrably unnecessary.

http://www.iom.edu/R...rer-Health.aspx


The results were startling across age ranges under 75 but in the US the young die earlier and live in poorer health than their counterparts in other developed countries. This is a reversal of what was found back in the 1950's.

Posted Image

The main difference between the US and other countries being compared - lack of universal health care and the prevalence of firearms. And this is despite the US spending more per capita on health care than the other countries.

As the New York Times reports:




For Americans Under 50, Stark Findings on Health



Younger Americans die earlier and live in poorer health than their counterparts in other developed countries, with far higher rates of death from guns, car accidents and drug addiction, according to a new analysis of health and longevity in the United States.


Researchers have known for some time that the United States fares poorly in comparison with other rich countries, a trend established in the 1980s. But most studies have focused on older ages, when the majority of people die.


The findings were stark. Deaths before age 50 accounted for about two-thirds of the difference in life expectancy between males in the United States and their counterparts in 16 other developed countries, and about one-third of the difference for females. The countries in the analysis included Canada, Japan, Australia, France, Germany and Spain.


The 378-page study by a panel of experts convened by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council is the first to systematically compare death rates and health measures for people of all ages, including American youths. It went further than other studies in documenting the full range of causes of death, from diseases to accidents to violence. It was based on a broad review of mortality and health studies and statistics.


The panel called the pattern of higher rates of disease and shorter lives “the U.S. health disadvantage,” and said it was responsible for dragging the country to the bottom in terms of life expectancy over the past 30 years. American men ranked last in life expectancy among the 17 countries in the study, and American women ranked second to last.


“Something fundamental is going wrong,” said Dr. Steven Woolf, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University, who led the panel. “This is not the product of a particular administration or political party. Something at the core is causing the U.S. to slip behind these other high-income countries. And it’s getting worse.”


Car accidents, gun violence and drug overdoses were major contributors to years of life lost by Americans before age 50.


The rate of firearm homicides was 20 times higher in the United States than in the other countries, according to the report, which cited a 2011 study of 23 countries. And though suicide rates were lower in the United States, firearm suicide rates were six times higher.


Sixty-nine percent of all American homicide deaths in 2007 involved firearms, compared with an average of 26 percent in other countries, the study said. “The bottom line is that we are not preventing damaging health behaviors,” said Samuel Preston, a demographer and sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania, who was on the panel. “You can blame that on public health officials, or on the health care system. No one understands where responsibility lies.”


Panelists were surprised at just how consistently Americans ended up at the bottom of the rankings. The United States had the second-highest death rate from the most common form of heart disease, the kind that causes heart attacks, and the second-highest death rate from lung disease, a legacy of high smoking rates in past decades. American adults also have the highest diabetes rates.


Youths fared no better. The United States has the highest infant mortality rate among these countries, and its young people have the highest rates of sexually transmitted diseases, teen pregnancy and deaths from car crashes. Americans lose more years of life before age 50 to alcohol and drug abuse than people in any of the other countries.


Americans also had the lowest probability over all of surviving to the age of 50. The report’s second chapter details health indicators for youths where the United States ranks near or at the bottom. There are so many that the list takes up four pages. Chronic diseases, including heart disease, also played a role for people under 50.


“We expected to see some bad news and some good news,” Dr. Woolf said. “But the U.S. ranked near and at the bottom in almost every heath indicator. That stunned us.”


There were bright spots. Death rates from cancers that can be detected with tests, like breast cancer, were lower in the United States. Adults had better control over their cholesterol and high blood pressure. And the very oldest Americans — above 75 — tended to outlive their counterparts.


The panel sought to explain the poor performance. It noted the United States has a highly fragmented health care system, with limited primary care resources and a large uninsured population. It has the highest rates of poverty among the countries studied.


Education also played a role. Americans who have not graduated from high school die from diabetes at three times the rate of those with some college, Dr. Woolf said. In the other countries, more generous social safety nets buffer families from the health consequences of poverty, the report said.


Still, even the people most likely to be healthy, like college-educated Americans and those with high incomes, fare worse on many health indicators.


The report also explored less conventional explanations. Could cultural factors like individualism and dislike of government interference play a role? Americans are less likely to wear seat belts and more likely to ride motorcycles without helmets.


The United States is a bigger, more heterogeneous society with greater levels of economic inequality, and comparing its health outcomes to those in countries like Sweden or France may seem lopsided. But the panelists point out that this country spends more on health care than any other in the survey. And as recently as the 1950s, Americans scored better in life expectancy and disease than many of the other countries in the current study.

http://www.nytimes.c...-says.html?_r=0



Its all the junk food and crap that these young Americans eat. Go to any state, especially southern states and you will see them stuffing their mouths like a pig in a fast food restaurant. You order a small drink from a fast food restaurant and they will give you a 2 L bottle. No wonder people are so big and fat there compared to us Canadians. This is what has caused all the health problems. You can have the best health care system but still have huge problems regarding the health of the younger population.

Edited by Pouria, 14 January 2013 - 12:24 PM.

Posted Image


#12 Pouria

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 12:27 PM

[/size]
You mean damaging health behaviours isn't the fault of a gun? Well damn. That's going to ruin a few convenient, dogmatic gimmicks here on CDC that follow every mass shooting, but rest assured, not going to stop the preachers from their aggrandising.


Dude, you should marry a gun. You defend it more than a husband would defend his wife against haters.

Posted Image


#13 Wetcoaster

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 01:53 PM

Its all the junk food and crap that these young Americans eat. Go to any state, especially southern states and you will see them stuffing their mouths like a pig in a fast food restaurant. You order a small drink from a fast food restaurant and they will give you a 2 L bottle. No wonder people are so big and fat there compared to us Canadians. This is what has caused all the health problems. You can have the best health care system but still have huge problems regarding the health of the younger population.

As the study makes clear that may be a contributing factor but there are number of other factors at work.
To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

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Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

#14 Jägermeister

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:22 PM

If you really want to see how unhealthy the US can be, look no further than Disney World.
I suspect over 75% obesity rates in that place.

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#15 kazin!

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:49 PM

Health care in the States is an arms race of medical equipment/technology. This'll all change with Obamacare though.
Posted Image




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