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Lance Armstrong the Fraud


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#1 Harbinger

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:44 PM

AUSTIN, Texas -- A person familiar with the situation says Lance Armstrong confessed to Oprah Winfrey during an interview Monday that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win the Tour de France.
The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the interview is to be broadcast Thursday on Winfrey's network.
THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE: Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.
Lance Armstrong's interview with Oprah Winfrey was "emotional at times," according to a person familiar with the situation, and it followed an apology to the staff at the Livestrong Foundation that left some of them in tears.
The person spoke on condition of anonymity and would neither confirm nor deny that the disgraced cyclist confessed to using performance-enhancing drugs during the taping, which is scheduled to be broadcast Thursday night and is supposed to remain confidential until then.
A group of about 10 close friends and advisers to Armstrong left a downtown Austin hotel about three hours after they arrived Monday afternoon for the interview. Among them were Armstrong attorneys Tim Herman and Sean Breen, along with Bill Stapleton, Armstrong's longtime agent, manager and business partner. All declined comment entering and exiting the session.
Soon afterward, Winfrey tweeted: "Just wrapped with (at)lancearmstrong More than 2 1/2 hours. He came READY!" She was scheduled to appear on "CBS This Morning" on Tuesday to discuss the interview.
Armstrong stopped at the Livestrong Foundation, which he founded, on his way to the interview and said, "I'm sorry" to staff members, some of whom broke down in tears. A person with knowledge of that session said Armstrong choked up and several employees cried during the session.
The person also said Armstrong apologized for letting the staff down and putting Livestrong at risk but he did not make a direct confession to using banned drugs. He said he would try to restore the foundation's reputation, and urged the group to continue fighting for the charity's mission of helping cancer patients and their families.
Armstrong spoke to a room full of about 100 staff members for about 20 minutes, expressing regret for everything the controversy has put them through, the person said. He told them how much the foundation means to him and that he considers the people who work there to be like members of his family. None of the people in the room challenged Armstrong over his long denials of doping.
Winfrey and her crew had earlier said they would film Monday's session at Armstrong's home. As a result, local and international news crews were encamped near the cyclist's Spanish-style villa before dawn.
Armstrong still managed to slip away for a run despite the crowds outside his home. He returned by cutting through a neighbor's yard and hopping a fence.
During a jog on Sunday, Armstrong talked to the AP for a few minutes saying, "I'm calm, I'm at ease and ready to speak candidly." He declined to go into specifics.
Armstrong lost the Tour titles he won from 1999 to 2005 following a voluminous U.S. Anti-Doping Agency report that portrayed him as a ruthless competitor, willing to go to any lengths to win the prestigious race. USADA chief executive Travis Tygart labeled the doping regimen allegedly carried out by the U.S. Postal Service team that Armstrong once led, "The most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen."
Yet Armstrong looked like just another runner getting in his roadwork when he talked to the AP, wearing a red jersey and black shorts, sunglasses and a white baseball cap pulled down to his eyes. Leaning into a reporter's car on the shoulder of a busy Austin road, he seemed unfazed by the attention and the news crews that made stops at his home. He cracked a few jokes about all the reporters vying for his attention, then added, "but now I want to finish my run," and took off down the road.
The interview with Winfrey was Armstrong's first public response to the USADA report. Armstrong was not expected to provide a detailed account about his involvement, nor address in depth many of the specific allegations in the more than 1,000-page USADA report.
In a text to the AP on Saturday, Armstrong said: "I told her (Winfrey) to go wherever she wants and I'll answer the questions directly, honestly and candidly. That's all I can say."
After a federal investigation of the cyclist was dropped without charges being brought last year, USADA stepped in with an investigation of its own. The agency deposed 11 former teammates and accused Armstrong of masterminding a complex and brazen drug program that included steroids, blood boosters and a range of other performance-enhancers.
Once all the information was out and his reputation shattered, Armstrong defiantly tweeted a picture of himself on a couch at home with all seven of the yellow leader's jerseys on display in frames behind him. But the preponderance of evidence in the USADA report and pending legal challenges on several fronts apparently forced him to change tactics after more a decade of denials.
He still faces legal problems.
Former teammate Floyd Landis, who was stripped of the 2006 Tour de France title for doping, has filed a federal whistle-blower lawsuit that accused Armstrong of defrauding the U.S. Postal Service. The Justice Department has yet to decide whether it will join the suit as a plaintiff.
The London-based Sunday Times also is suing Armstrong to recover about $500,000 it paid him to settle a libel lawsuit. On Sunday, the newspaper took out a full-page ad in the Chicago Tribune, offering Winfrey suggestions for what questions to ask Armstrong. Dallas-based SCA Promotions, which tried to deny Armstrong a promised bonus for a Tour de France win, has threatened to bring yet another lawsuit seeking to recover more than $7.5 million an arbitration panel awarded the cyclist in that dispute.
The lawsuit most likely to be influenced by a confession might be the Sunday Times case. Potential perjury charges stemming from Armstrong's sworn testimony in the 2005 arbitration fight would not apply because of the statute of limitations. Armstrong was not deposed during the federal investigation that was closed last year.
Many of his sponsors dropped Armstrong after the damning USADA report - at the cost of tens of millions of dollars - and soon after, he left the board of Livestrong, which he founded in 1997. Armstrong is still said to be worth about $100 million.
Livestrong might be one reason Armstrong has decided to come forward with an apology and limited confession. The charity supports cancer patients and still faces an image problem because of its association with Armstrong. He also may be hoping a confession would allow him to return to competition in the elite triathlon or running events he participated in after his cycling career.
World Anti-Doping Code rules state his lifetime ban cannot be reduced to less than eight years. WADA and U.S. Anti-Doping officials could agree to reduce the ban further depending on what information Armstrong provides and his level of cooperation.


Read more: http://www.theprovin...l#ixzz2I05cLAw3


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#2 vancanfan

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:45 PM

The bugger finally comes clean
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#3 Harbinger

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:46 PM

The bugger finally comes clean


The article doesn't say definitively he did, But going to the livestrong foundation offices and apologizing. That pretty much sums it up.
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#4 vancanfan

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:48 PM

http://news.yahoo.co...-002603731.html

yeah this link says he also confessed to Oprah
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#5 Jägermeister

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:50 PM

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Who cares, take away his accolades and get on with it, no need to patronize the guy.
Sure he lied, but he's done so much for cancer research and for charity, I don't see how people can be so hostile towards a man who has done so much good.
He's raised over $325 million for cancer research, I think I can forgive him for doping. Plus think of it this way, without his doping he wouldn't have been such an influence and his organization would have not been nearly as successful as it is.

Edited by Jägermeister, 14 January 2013 - 05:51 PM.

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#6 MillerGenuineDraft

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:55 PM

Who cares, take away his accolades and get on with it, no need to patronize the guy.
Sure he lied, but he's done so much for cancer research and for charity, I don't see how people can be so hostile towards a man who has done so much good.
He's raised over $325 million for cancer research, I think I can forgive him for doping. Plus think of it this way, without his doping he wouldn't have been such an influence and his organization would have not been nearly as successful as it is.


I love your glass half full attitude. (no sarcasm)
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#7 Harbinger

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:58 PM

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Who cares, take away his accolades and get on with it, no need to patronize the guy.
Sure he lied, but he's done so much for cancer research and for charity, I don't see how people can be so hostile towards a man who has done so much good.
He's raised over $325 million for cancer research, I think I can forgive him for doping. Plus think of it this way, without his doping he wouldn't have been such an influence and his organization would have not been nearly as successful as it is.



So cheat at all costs and lie about it in the face of accusations and sue others for telling the truth. Sounds like great moral values to instill on people. I can't wait to see how many lawsuits are filed against him for monies he was given because of his lying cheating and now stealing.
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#8 Down by the River

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:58 PM

Strip him of his Yellow Jackets, and he has still done more for society than I will ever have the opportunity to do.
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OMG we could've had McKeown!

I think Virtanen was a terrible pick given that he's out for 6 months which will hinder his development. You don't pick someone at #6 under that circumstance, along with the fact that he was given a 3/5 IQ (aka he's dumb). 

God dammit Benning. WHY VIRTANEN? Terrible move.

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#9 Everybody Hates Raymond

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:59 PM

You'd be surprised how many champions likely used performance enhacing drugs. NHL only has "no problem" because they're extremely hush-hush about these things for image
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#10 vancanfan

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:03 PM

It almost begs to answer the question, if Armstrong doped yet still made all this money for charity, is that really ok ?

Is it right for a charitable organization to take money from lets say a drug cartel ?

Just saying, it seems like a real grey area.
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#11 Jägermeister

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:05 PM

So cheat at all costs and lie about it in the face of accusations and sue others for telling the truth. Sounds like great moral values to instill on people. I can't wait to see how many lawsuits are filed against him for monies he was given because of his lying cheating and now stealing.


IMO his good deeds outweigh his bad deeds.
It's subjective so you can disagree all you want, but I'm not going to paint a man who has done as much in a bad light.
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#12 Harbinger

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:09 PM

IMO his good deeds outweigh his bad deeds.
It's subjective so you can disagree all you want, but I'm not going to paint a man who has done as much in a bad light.



we can definitely disagree and there is no problem with that.
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#13 Tearloch7

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:14 PM

Speaks to his character and perhaps, to a lessor extent, the American psyche .. 'win at all costs, no matter what it takes .. we can deal with the consequences later' .. key word here is that he is a "fraud" ..
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#14 canucklax

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:21 PM

So cheat at all costs and lie about it in the face of accusations and sue others for telling the truth. Sounds like great moral values to instill on people. I can't wait to see how many lawsuits are filed against him for monies he was given because of his lying cheating and now stealing.


Wow your attitude is horrible. I'd try to point out what other users have said about the hundreds of millions he has raised for cancer research, but you only want to crusify him for doing what was done by every other cyclist in the era, and then trying to deny it. Of course he wanted to hide what he may have done(still no positive tests) but to judge him solely on that is asinine. Doping or no, he completed a task many of could never in riding the Tour, even after fighting cancer, and then raised so much for a health issue that affects everyone in the world. So please leave your extremely pessimistic view at the door and appreciate the good he's done for the world
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#15 thepedestrian

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:27 PM

He's a fraud?? I think everyone --knew-- he was on performance enhancing drugs and all of the top competitive cyclists are. You simply can't compete with them without using them and thats the truth. Its just who gets busted and who doesn't. He didn't have an unnatural competitive edge because the other cyclists were also using performance enhancing drugs.

Many of your favorite NHL players use steroids also. (Allthough they haven't been busted) Are they all frauds? Is Usain Bolt a fraud?
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#16 Harbinger

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:27 PM

He's a fraud?? I think everyone --knew-- he was on performance enhancing drugs and all of the top competitive cyclists are. You simply can't compete with them without using them and thats the truth. Its just who gets busted and who doesn't. He didn't have an unnatural competitive edge because the other cyclists were also using performance enhancing drugs.

Many of your favorite NHL players use steroids also. (Allthough they haven't been busted) Are they all frauds? Is Usain Bolt a fraud?


If you claim to be clean and you are not. Then yes you are a fraud. That is pretty much the definition of fraud.
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#17 thepedestrian

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:29 PM

Speaks to his character and perhaps, to a lessor extent, the American psyche .. 'win at all costs, no matter what it takes .. we can deal with the consequences later' .. key word here is that he is a "fraud" ..


No it doesn't speak to the American psyche. It speaks to any competitive person that wants to win so bad they are willing tro do whatever it takes. People with the kind of dedication and work ethic very few people have. If you don't think he worked his ass off for those titles then you are sadly mistaken.
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#18 thepedestrian

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:32 PM

If you claim to be clean and you are not. Then yes you are a fraud. That is pretty much the definition of fraud.


I agree. I am more speaking to kind of the 'aura' that surronds him. Coming back from cancer to win the Tour De France is simply amazing. Performance enhancing drugs or not. You can't take away that what he did was amazing.
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#19 Harbinger

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:41 PM

I agree. I am more speaking to kind of the 'aura' that surronds him. Coming back from cancer to win the Tour De France is simply amazing. Performance enhancing drugs or not. You can't take away that what he did was amazing.


Actually I think they did just that. That's what stripping him of his 7 titles means. He didn't win anything. He cheated and should never have even had the opportunity to even compete. No one that cheated should have. Now he gets to be shamed in front of the world for being the liar and fraud he really was. No one thinks of Ben Johnson as a champion anymore either.

Edited by Harbinger, 14 January 2013 - 06:44 PM.

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#20 Tearloch7

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:42 PM

No it doesn't speak to the American psyche. It speaks to any competitive person that wants to win so bad they are willing tro do whatever it takes. People with the kind of dedication and work ethic very few people have. If you don't think he worked his ass off for those titles then you are sadly mistaken.


No where did I say he did not work hard .. it just speaks to the fact that the American dream must be achieved at any cost .. even if that means lying and cheating .. people applaud his charity work as do I .. it still does not take away from the fact he is a cheat and a fraud ..
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#21 Stefan

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:50 PM

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Wooooooaaaaaaah.
This guy did steroids? So he's sort of like a typical baseball player, except he donated millions of dollars to cancer research.
BURN HIM!!
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#22 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:06 PM

We all know he was a cheater, the fact that he was doping is nothing new, which is why I won't need to watch or even care about this show. He had his chance to come clean many years ago, instead he went after snitches and was a bully. There's no taking away from the fact that his public image has rightfully taken a thrashing and it wouldn't surprise me if his cancer was a result of doping. His public problems are self-imposed and I don't feel bad for that.

Still, as a few others mention, due to his donations to cancer research and philanthropy, I can't be too hard on the guy. I don't care so much that Lance Armstrong is taking an image beating (should be a clue to others not to cheat), but I hope LiveStrong continues to do well without him. At least Lance had some other people in mind besides himself.

Edited by zaibatsu, 14 January 2013 - 07:08 PM.

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#23 Bitter Melon

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:09 PM

I find it fascinating that people are willing to crucify a man who has done more good than they ever will for 'cheating'.
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#24 canucklax

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:49 PM

No where did I say he did not work hard .. it just speaks to the fact that the American dream must be achieved at any cost .. even if that means lying and cheating .. people applaud his charity work as do I .. it still does not take away from the fact he is a cheat and a fraud ..

Please stop speaking out of your rear. There's been so much anti-American hate on these boards the last few weeks its sickening. The "American Dream" isn't to cheat, steal, or lie your way to the top. The dream is to have a job that you don't mind, live comfortably and have a family that loves you for most Americans. For many immigrants it is to get a job that allows you to send money home, to allow them to be able to have a better life. It varies person to person, but it most certainly isn't the selfish view you stereo-typically plaster on anyone from the 50 states
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#25 Harbinger

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:51 PM

Lance and I both have something in common. Neither of us have any tour de france championships.
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#26 Bertuzzi Babe

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:56 PM

Lance and I both have something in common. Neither of us have any tour de france championships.


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#27 Bertuzzi Babe

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:57 PM

I find it fascinating that people are willing to crucify a man who has done more good than they ever will for 'cheating'.


Truly honourable and laudable people do not have to cheat and/or do fraudulent things order to accomplish good things in the world.

Edited by Bertuzzi Babe, 14 January 2013 - 10:01 PM.

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#28 canucklax

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:01 PM

Truly honest and honourable people do not have to cheat and/or do fraudulent things order to accomplish good things in the world.


Please name some modern people who fall under that. Nobody is a saint nowadays, too much info is available
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#29 Tearloch7

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:04 PM

Please stop speaking out of your rear. There's been so much anti-American hate on these boards the last few weeks its sickening. The "American Dream" isn't to cheat, steal, or lie your way to the top. The dream is to have a job that you don't mind, live comfortably and have a family that loves you for most Americans. For many immigrants it is to get a job that allows you to send money home, to allow them to be able to have a better life. It varies person to person, but it most certainly isn't the selfish view you stereo-typically plaster on anyone from the 50 states


Get your head out of yer arse so you can hear me clearly .. Lance Armstrong IS NOT AN IMMIGRANT .. and many American athletes adopt a "win at all costs" mentality .. if you are in denial about that FACT then you can not see past your own bias ..
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#30 canucklax

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:08 PM

Get your head out of yer arse so you can hear me clearly .. Lance Armstrong IS NOT AN IMMIGRANT .. and many American athletes adopt a "win at all costs" mentality .. if you are in denial about that FACT then you can not see past your own bias ..


I was pointing out that the American Dream is different for everyone. Just because many American athletes adopt the mentality does not mean that the view is exclusive to them
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