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Man who helped Sandy Hook kids is harassed by conspiracy theorists


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#31 EmployeeoftheMonth

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:29 PM

Watch this video and you guys will all realize why this man is being harrased...



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx9GxXYKx_8&feature=youtu.be&bpctr=1358309673&bpctr=1358321944&bpctr=1358322026&bpctr=1358322036&bpctr=1358322048

Disgusting. Just not in the way those (you?) conspiracy sheep believe it is.
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#32 dudeone

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:34 PM




AP-GfK poll: Anger, concern follow Conn. shooting
By TOM RAUM and JENNIFER AGIESTA | Associated Press – 3 hrs ago

http://news.yahoo.com/ap-gfk-poll-anger-concern-conn-shooting-213806247--politics.html
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans were angrier about last month's horrific school shooting in Connecticut than they were about the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll.
And more favor stricter gun laws now than did shortly after the shooting deaths of 32 people on the campus of Virginia Tech in April 2007.


Three-quarters of Americans said they reacted to the Connecticut massacre of with deep anger, higher than the 65 percent who said they felt that way in a poll from NORC at the University of Chicago after the 9/11 attacks. A majority, 54 percent, said they felt deeply ashamed that an event like Newtown could happen in the United States, well above the 40 percent who said they felt that way in the wake of the disaster that followed Hurricane Katrina and 35 percent who felt that way after the shootings at Virginia Tech.


The massacre prompted 3 in 10 to give serious thought to whether they could really be safe anywhere these days and 4 in 10 felt strongly that the deaths could have been prevented. Both figures are higher now than after the Virginia Tech shooting deaths.


About a third said that after Newtown, they felt there may be too many guns in this country. A similar share said they worried how the shooting would impact U.S. gun laws.


President Barack Obama unveiled Wednesday a wide-ranging package of steps for reducing gun violence, including proposed bans on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines, as well as universal background checks for gun sales.


Many of the more restrictive proposals under consideration, such as the assault-weapons ban, would face stiff congressional opposition, particularly among Republicans.


By contrast, the general public appears receptive to stronger federal action following the Dec. 14 shooting spree at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., which claimed the lives of 20 children and six adults.


Some 58 percent favor strengthening gun laws in the United States. Just 5 percent felt such laws should be loosened, while 35 percent said they should be left unchanged.


In comparison, after the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007, an Associated Press-Ipsos poll found that 47 percent wanted stricter gun laws, 38 percent thought they should remain as is and 11 percent wanted to see them loosened.


Caroline Konczey, 63, a retired Navy officer from Indio, Calif., is among those supporting a ban on military-style assault weapons. "I can't imagine why anyone would want one," she said. "What do you do with that, unless you're a collector?"


She suggested an underlying source of gun violence was the breakdown of the nuclear family and a lack of access to mental health care. "Until you strengthen the structure of the family that teaches respect for people, then this stuff goes down," she said.


Specifically, majorities in the new poll favored a nationwide ban on military-style, rapid-fire guns (55 percent) and limits on the amount and type of gun violence that can be portrayed in video games, movies or on television (54 percent). About half (51 percent) of those surveyed back a ban on the sale of magazines holding 10 or more bullets.


A lopsided 84 percent of adults would like to see the establishment of a federal standard for background checks for people buying guns at gun shows, the poll found.


At the same time 51 percent said that they believed laws limiting gun ownership infringe on the public's Second Amendment right to possess and carry firearms. Among Republicans, 75 percent cited such infringement.


Most Democrats (76 percent) and independents (60 percent) back stricter gun laws, while a majority of Republicans (53 percent) want gun laws left alone.


There is also a gender gap. Gun control is a more important issue for women, with 68 percent saying it was very or extremely important to them, than for men (57 percent). And women are more likely to back stricter gun laws: 67 percent favor them, compared with 49 percent of men.


"Military-style weapons should be military guns, not John Q. Public guns," said Ellen Huffman, 55, of Huntersville, N.C., who supports a ban on assault-style weapons and high-capacity magazines.


Huffman said early detection of mental health problems would go a long way to curbing gun violence. If such problems are caught early enough "you won't have people killing people," she said.


Among gun owners, just 40 percent back a ban on the sale of military-type, rapid-fire guns, and 37 percent favor a ban on high-capacity magazines, while 66 percent of non-gun owners would ban military-style weapons and 60 percent would ban high-capacity magazines.


However, 80 percent of gun owners do support federal standards for gun-show background checks, as do 87 percent of non-gun owners.


Gun owners lean more Republican than the overall public. Fifty-five percent of them are Republicans, compared with 30 percent who are Democrats.


Max Lude, 70, a retired teacher from West Frankfort, Ill., said limiting magazines to 10 rounds "is probably the smartest thing they can do" to reduce mass tragedies. Mandatory background checks also would help, as would mandatory prison sentences for those convicted of gun grimes, said Lude, a National Rifle Association member and hunter-safety instructor.


"It's a complicated problem with a complicated solution," he said. "It's not just a one-time, quick-fix deal."


The gun control debate heated up after Adam Lanza, 20, shot his way into the Newtown school on Dec. 14 and killed 26 people before committing suicide. Lanza also killed his mother at her home before the shooting spree. His mother kept guns at the home she shared with her son.


The poll of 1,004 adults was conducted by telephone Jan. 10-14, 2013. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

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#33 Wetcoaster

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:40 PM

She should visit districts with teachers who are armed in Utah to make a more informed decision. One thing you'll notice is they aren't "packing" while they sit on the carpet with children as she, in an uninformed fashion, caricatures armed teachers doing. They also aren't inexperienced. They are licensed and trained.

Except that is not what a number of research studies bear out.

As Harvard University's Injury Control Research Center for Firearms Research has found more guns means more accidental shootings and accidental deaths as well as firearm homicides.

And they have also determined that the claim of large numbers of annual self-defense gun uses by American citizens is invalid and that purported self-defense gun uses are gun uses in escalating arguments and are both socially undesirable and illegal.

As far as children they have found that children in states with many guns have elevated rates of unintentional gun deaths, suicide and homicide. The state rates of non-firearm suicide and non-firearm homicide among children are not related to firearm availability.
http://www.hsph.harv...earms-research/
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#34 dudeone

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:01 PM

Why Sandy Hook Massacre Spawned Conspiracy Theories

By Benjamin Radford, LiveScience Bad Science Columnist | LiveScience.com – 8 hrs ago

http://news.yahoo.co...-184323398.html

One month after the Sandy Hook school shootings, the list of victims continues to grow. One man, Gene Rosen — who found six children and a bus driver in his driveway, brought them into his home, fed them and called parents to assure them that their children were safe — has been harassed by telephone, email and online by those who think he is lying about his actions, and is part of a conspiracy.

Rosen is not the first hero to be assaulted and insulted by conspiracy theorists with doubts. In 2002, when conspiracy theorist Bart Sibrel confronted astronaut Buzz Aldrin and called him a "coward and a liar" for faking the moon landings, the 72-year-old promptly punched Sibrel in the face.

A group called the Sandy Hook Truther movement has emerged from the dust and chaos over the past weeks to claim that the school shooting was all a staged event. Though many Americans are outraged and incredulous that anyone could doubt that the tragedy even happened, the Sandy Hook school shootings follow classic conspiracy thinking. Here are a few reasons why.

Poignant political implications

Shootings — even child murders — happen every day, several times a day, in America. According to UNICEF, America has the worst record of child abuse and homicide in the industrialized world, with an average of 27 children killed every week by their parents and caregivers. But those child murders don't have implications for enacting a national policy on gun control.

Most events producing conspiracy theories have important social and political implications, and the Sandy Hook shootings are no exception. No one, regardless of what side of the gun control issue they are on, can deny that guns played a key role in the Sandy Hook killings. So the conspiracy theorists must instead challenge the claim that the attack even occurred. They believe it's all a hoax to scare people into supporting more gun control and a step toward an outright repeal of the Second Amendment. [5 Milestones in Gun Control History]

'Holes' in the 'official story'

A common theme running through conspiracy thinking is that if you're smart enough, and just look closely enough at all the news coverage and available information, you can see lies and contradictions in accounts of the event. Truthers claim that they have found "absolute proof" that the shootings were a hoax, pointing to a 6-year-old girl named Emilie Parker, who was shot to death in the school massacre.

Or was she? They claim that the smoking-gun photographic proof that Emilie is still alive is that she was photographed after the shooting with President Obama during a visit with the families. The girl is actually Emilie's sister, wearing the same dress that Emilie wore in another photograph.

In the topsy-turvy world of conspiracy thinking, any little girl who resembles Emilie and is wearing the same dress as one she owned must be her. It could not possibly be her sister, who could not possibly be wearing either Emilie's dress or an identical one. Instead, it's obviously proof that the whole shooting was faked.

But this claim, even if it were true, raises more questions than it answers. For example, if Sandy Hook was indeed a "staged event" as claimed, with Emilie Parker alive and the president part of the conspiracy, why would the government be so careless as to release a photograph of Emilie, knowing that she had been reported dead in a carefully orchestrated national hoax? Is a widely published photo opportunity with the president of the United States really the best place to hide someone who is supposedly dead?

Conspiracy theorist websites offer dozens of other examples and pieces of evidence, ranging from real or perceived contradictions in eyewitness accounts to conflicting news reports. And indeed there are some contradictions. [The 10 Most Bizarre Conspiracy Theories]

The minds of conspiracy theorists

But what the conspiratorial mind sees as misinformation and lies, others see as merely perfectly ordinary incomplete and inaccurate information following a multifaceted tragedy. Especially in the hours and first days after such a chaotic and horrifying event, witnesses can be confused and mistaken. Police officers and reporters can misspeak, or be given incorrect information.

Not every single statement about what occurred, from dozens of different people in different places at different times, will agree in every detail. Three different witnesses to a minor car accident will often give three slightly different accounts of what they saw, so it's unrealistic to expect dozens of people who were involved in a chaotic school massacre to report exactly the same things.

Part of the reason that conspiracy theories linger is that any contradictory evidence — no matter how conclusive or compelling — can just be dismissed by claiming that it's part of the cover-up. There is ultimately no evidence that would satisfy most conspiracy theorists. Those who distrust the government will use any excuse to support their beliefs, logical or not. Conspiracy theorists prefer complex mysteries over simple truths, and find mystery where none exists.

Research has shown not only that a person who believes in one conspiracy theory is likely to support others, but also contradictions don't deter conspiracy theorists.

The idea that the Sandy Hook massacre was faked is not only absurd, but also an insult to the victims of the tragedy. The victims are really, provably gone; they are not safely hidden away somewhere until the Sandy Hook shooting has served its ultimate goal of taking away America's guns. The bullet holes are there. The children and adults are dead. Toxic conspiracies, however, will live on.

Benjamin Radford is deputy editor of Skeptical Inquirer science magazine and author of six books, including "Media Mythmakers: How Journalists, Activists, and Advertisers Mislead Us." His website site is www.BenjaminRadford.com.
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#35 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:14 PM

That article above did okay in addressing the conspiracy which has been growing in popularity, but rather than simply trying to discredit them by saying they support other conspiracies, they need to focus more on the claims and debunk them the way it was done following 9/11.

Edited by zaibatsu, 16 January 2013 - 08:14 PM.

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#36 Wetcoaster

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 09:44 PM

That article above did okay in addressing the conspiracy which has been growing in popularity, but rather than simply trying to discredit them by saying they support other conspiracies, they need to focus more on the claims and debunk them the way it was done following 9/11.

Which as the article points out has very little effect.

Part of the reason that conspiracy theories linger is that any contradictory evidence — no matter how conclusive or compelling — can just be dismissed by claiming that it's part of the cover-up. There is ultimately no evidence that would satisfy most conspiracy theorists. Those who distrust the government will use any excuse to support their beliefs, logical or not. Conspiracy theorists prefer complex mysteries over simple truths, and find mystery where none exists.


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#37 Mr. Ambien

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 12:16 AM

Which as the article points out has very little effect.

Part of the reason that conspiracy theories linger is that any contradictory evidence — no matter how conclusive or compelling — can just be dismissed by claiming that it's part of the cover-up. There is ultimately no evidence that would satisfy most conspiracy theorists. Those who distrust the government will use any excuse to support their beliefs, logical or not. Conspiracy theorists prefer complex mysteries over simple truths, and find mystery where none exists.

That paragraph is one of the reasons I made the post -- as I said, rather than simply discredit them like that paragraph does, they need to focus directly on the claims and debunk them like was done for 9/11.

One example of this is the nanothermite theory. Another was the rocket hitting the Pentagon theory. These were quite well debunked and not simply dismissed as "like other conspiracies".

Edited by zaibatsu, 17 January 2013 - 12:17 AM.

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#38 woofwoofmoomoo

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 03:05 AM

<p>

That paragraph is one of the reasons I made the post -- as I said, rather than simply discredit them like that paragraph does, they need to focus directly on the claims and debunk them like was done for 9/11.

One example of this is the nanothermite theory. Another was the rocket hitting the Pentagon theory. These were quite well debunked and not simply dismissed as "like other conspiracies".

All they need to do is point out that all this conspiracy and 2nd Amendment arguments are just BS cover for the real motivation of the NRA: to gin up nonsense so they can sell more weapons for the gun manufacturers they lobby for, to the paranoids that buy into that crap.

Edited by woofwoofmoomoo, 17 January 2013 - 03:08 AM.

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#39 Wetcoaster

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 11:31 AM

That paragraph is one of the reasons I made the post -- as I said, rather than simply discredit them like that paragraph does, they need to focus directly on the claims and debunk them like was done for 9/11.

One example of this is the nanothermite theory. Another was the rocket hitting the Pentagon theory. These were quite well debunked and not simply dismissed as "like other conspiracies".

As I said that is unlikely to work given that a substantial number of Americans who buy into conspiracy theories and will not be swayed by facts - the so-called facts in this construct are just part of the government conspiracy and cover-up in their wack-a-doodle universe. This is clear from a study that has just been released.
http://www.scribd.co...piracy-theories

As an example look at all the information out there on Obama's place of birth being Hawaii and yet 64% of registered Republican voters are "Birthers".

A whopping 64 percent of Republicans think it’s “probably true” that President Obama is hiding important information about his background and early life, including his possible birthplace, according to a new nationwide survey of registered voters from Fairleigh Dickinson University’s PublicMind project examining Americans’ belief in political conspiracy theories.


And it is not limited to Republicans:


Belief in conspiracy theories is not unique to Republicans — 56 percent of Democrats believe in one of the four popular myths researchers asked about — but it is more common. Among registered GOPers, 75 percent said at least one of the four theories was likely true. Moreover, researchers noted: “Generally, the more people know about current events, the less likely they are to believe in conspiracy theories — but not among Republicans, where more knowledge leads to greater belief in political conspiracies.”


“There are several possible explanations for this,” said Fairleigh Dickinson political scientist Dan Cassino, who helped conduct the poll. “It could be that more conspiracy-minded Republicans seek out more information, or that the information some Republicans seek out just tends to reinforce these myths.”


The four theories they asked about were: Birtherism (36 percent of all Americans believe it); that the government knew about 9/11 in advance (25 percent of Americans think that’s probably true); that Obama stole the 2012 election (19 percent believe this one); and that George W. Bush stole the 2004 election via vote rigging (23 percent believe it).


Basic rule of thumb - do not confuse conspiracy nuts with facts. They will not accept them and will just incorporate them into their conspiracy theory.

We see similar treatment of facts, studies and statistics from gun loons.
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#40 Tearloch7

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 02:06 PM

^ ^ ^ I refuse to believe any of the above .. are you doing some mind-control-juju on me? .. B)
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#41 Wetcoaster

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 02:11 PM

^ ^ ^ I refuse to believe any of the above .. are you doing some mind-control-juju on me? .. B)

These aren't the droids you're looking for.
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To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

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