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41 westerners taken hostage in algeria


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#1 sam13371337

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 05:23 PM

Islamists seize 41 hostages at Algeria gas plant
By Beatrice Khadige (AFP)–40 minutes ago
ALGIERS — Islamist gunmen killed two people and took 41 Western hostages Wednesday in Algeria in what they said was a revenge attack on the country for opening its airspace to French warplanes hitting Islamists in Mali.
The Islamists, who said they entered Algeria from northern Mali, told Mauritanian media they were holding 41 Westerners including French, British and Japanese citizens, as well as seven Americans, at a southern gas field.
One Briton and an Algerian were killed in the attack, Algeria's Interior Minister Dahou Ould Kablia said. Six people were wounded: another Briton, a Norwegian and a Scot, as well as an Algerian security agent and two policemen.
Britain said it was working closely with Algeria over the crisis.
The In Amenas gas field is jointly operated by British oil giant BP, Norway's Statoil and state-run Algerian energy firm Sonatrach. Production was shut down after the attack.
A worker at the scene told AFP by phone that the armed group was demanding freedom for 100 Islamists held in Algeria in exchange for the Western hostages.
"The assailants have demanded that these Islamists be taken to northern Mali," he said.
A group calling itself "Signatories for Blood" claimed the action in a post to the Mauritanian website Alakhbar.
It was in retaliation both for the French intervention in Mali and for Algeria's cooperation, it said.
"Algeria was chosen for this operation to teach (Algerian President Abdelaziz) Bouteflika that we will never accept the humiliation of the Algerian people's honour... by opening Algerian airspace to French planes," it said.
The group called for an end to the French action against the insurgents in Mali.
The Algerian interior minister, speaking on national television, insisted Algiers would not negotiate with the "terrorists", who he said were surrounded by the army and security services.
The group appeared to want to leave the country with the hostages, which Algiers had rejected, he said. They were "around 20 men from the region," he added, denying that they had come from either Mali or Libya.
The attack took place at dawn, when armed Islamists targeted a bus carrying oil workers to the In Amenas airport, the interior ministry said. Repelled by security escorts, they instead took hostages at the gas field's residential compound.
BP confirmed in a statement that the In Amenas gas complex had been attacked at around 0500 GMT.
A Statoil official said 12 employees, including nine Norwegians, had been "implicated" in the hostage-taking, without elaborating. The company said it had just under 20 staff members at the facility.
-- 'Many lives at stake' --
A French catering company said 150 of its Algerian employees were being held at the complex.
"The information I have is that a group of around 60 terrorists from neighbouring countries attacked the base overnight," said CIS Catering's executive director Regis Arnoux.
"They took all the expatriates hostage, regardless of nationality, and tied them up. The Algerian staff are being held inside the site," he told French newspaper the Journal du Dimanche.
"We fear the worst, there are many lives at stake," he added.
Algerian news agency APS said Algerian hostages were later freed, without saying how many.
Japanese engineering firm JGC said five Japanese workers were believed to have been seized, while separate sources said a Frenchmen, an Irish citizen and a Norwegian were seized.
French news channel France 24 reported that Malaysian and Filipino nationals were also among the hostages.
The US State Department confirmed that American citizens were being held. The White House said it was "closely monitoring" the situation.
British Foreign Secretary William Hague said London was in close touch with Algiers.
"A number of people are held hostage. This does include a number of British nationals. This is therefore an extremely dangerous situation," Hague said.
One of the attackers told AFP by telephone: "We are members of Al-Qaeda and we came from northern Mali."
An Islamist spokesman told Mauritanian media the attack was "a reaction to Algeria's flagrant interference in allowing French planes into its airspace to launch raids on northern Mali."
Five hostages were being held at the gas plant, while the others were in a housing complex on the site, he added.
France launched a major offensive against the jihadists in Mali on January 11 to prevent them from advancing on the capital Bamako.
Algeria announced on Tuesday it had closed its border with Mali, following the French offensive against Al-Qaeda in its southern neighbour, but the 2,000-kilometre (1,200-mile) desert frontier is almost impossible to seal.
On Saturday, Algeria expressed its "unequivocal support" for Mali's transitional authorities. A day later Paris said Algiers had authorised overflights by France-based Rafale fighter jets for the operation there.


http://www.google.co...025da9f63f5.841
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#2 nucklehead

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 05:26 PM

http://forum.canucks...-1-cargo-plane/
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#3 sam13371337

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 05:26 PM

it's a little ironic given how the west were supporting these people to overthrow the libyan government.

Now libya is a failed state, mali will soon become one. And islamists have gained a major footstep in a strategic area and access to unlimited weapons.


Good job NATO.
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#4 sam13371337

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 05:27 PM

http://forum.canucks...-1-cargo-plane/


this has taken place in algeria. and its a hostage situation.

thought it was seperate and deserved its own thread since its major news
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#5 Richard Parker

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 05:34 PM

it's a little ironic given how the west were supporting these people to overthrow the libyan government.

Now libya is a failed state, mali will soon become one. And islamists have gained a major footstep in a strategic area and access to unlimited weapons.


Good job NATO.


Not sure how you found irony through the connection between a reported kidnapping in Algeria and the self-deterministic events that took place in Libya, or .....or the connection either, to be honest.

What does NATO have to do with the kidnapping in Algeria or the efforts underway in The Republic of Mali by French troops?
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#6 taxi

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 06:13 PM

it's a little ironic given how the west were supporting these people to overthrow the libyan government.

Now libya is a failed state, mali will soon become one. And islamists have gained a major footstep in a strategic area and access to unlimited weapons.


Good job NATO.


Yeah, and when Nato just sits back and watches things turn out so wonderfully. Take a look at Syria, for instance....err wait....

More of a damned if you do, damned if you don't situation. It's also likely Ghaddafi would have lost eventually anyway, the question was how many were going to die in the process.
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#7 Lancaster

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 06:38 PM

When the West gets involved, some folks get mad.
When the West don't get involved, some folks get mad.
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#8 Wetcoaster

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 05:32 PM

Algerian special forces have stormed the gas plant but the death and injury toll is still unclear.

Algerian helicopters and special forces stormed a gas plant in the stony plains of the Sahara on Thursday to wipe out Islamist militants and free hostages from at least 10 countries. Bloody chaos ensued, leaving the fate of the fighters and many of the captives uncertain.

Dueling claims from the military and the militants muddied the world's understanding of an event that angered Western leaders, raised world oil prices and complicated the international military operation in neighboring Mali.

At least six people, and perhaps many more, were killed — Britons, Filipinos and Algerians. Terrorized hostages from Ireland and Norway trickled out of the Ain Amenas plant, families urging them never to return.

Dozens more remained unaccounted for: Americans, Britons, French, Norwegians, Romanians, Malaysians, Japanese, Algerians and the fighters themselves.


The U.S. government sent an unmanned surveillance drone to the BP-operated site, near the border with Libya and 1,290 kilometers from the Algerian capital, but it could do little more than watch Thursday's intervention. Algeria's army-dominated government, hardened by decades of fighting Islamist militants, shrugged aside foreign offers of help and drove ahead alone.

With the hostage drama entering its second day Thursday, Algerian security forces moved in, first with helicopter fire and then special forces, according to diplomats, a website close to the militants, and an Algerian security official. The government said it was forced to intervene because the militants were being stubborn and wanted to flee with the hostages.

The militants — led by a Mali-based al-Qaeda offshoot known as the Masked Brigade — suffered losses in Thursday's military assault, but succeeded in garnering a global audience.

Gas plant seized Wednesday
Even violence-scarred Algerians were stunned by the brazen hostage-taking Wednesday, the biggest in northern Africa in years and the first to include Americans as targets. Mass fighting in the 1990s had largely spared the lucrative oil and gas industry that gives Algeria its economic independence and regional weight.

Casualty figures in the Algerian standoff varied widely. The remote location is extremely hard to reach and was surrounded by Algerian security forces — who, like the militants, are inclined to advertise their successes and minimize their failures.

"An important number of hostages were freed and an important number of terrorists were eliminated, and we regret the few dead and wounded," Algeria's communications minister, Mohand Said Oubelaid, told national media, adding that the "terrorists are multinational," coming from several different countries with the goal of "destabilizing Algeria, embroiling it in the Mali conflict and damaging its natural gas infrastructure."

The official news agency said four hostages were killed in Thursday's operation, two Britons and two Filipinos. Two others, a Briton and an Algerian, died Wednesday in an ambush on a bus ferrying foreign workers to an airport. Citing hospital officials, the APS news agency said six Algerians and seven foreigners were injured.


APS said some 600 local workers were safely freed in the raid — but many of those were reportedly released the day before by the militants themselves.

The militants, via a Mauritanian news website, claimed that 35 hostages and 15 militants died in the helicopter strafing. A spokesman for the Masked Brigade told the Nouakchott Information Agency in Mauritania that only seven hostages survived.

By nightfall, Algeria's government said the raid was over. But the whereabouts of the rest of the plant workers was unclear.

U.S. President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron spoke on the phone to share their confusion. White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said the Obama administration was "seeking clarity from the government of Algeria."

Militants earlier said they were holding seven Americans, but the administration confirmed only that Americans were among those taken. The U.S. government was in contact with American businesses across North Africa and the Middle East to help them guard against the possibility of copycat attacks.

BP, the Norwegian company Statoil and the Algerian state oil company Sonatrach, operate the gas field and a Japanese company, JGC Corp, provides services for the facility.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe protested the military raid as an act that "threatened the lives of the hostages," according to a spokesman.

Jean-Christophe Gray, a spokesman for Cameron, said Britain was not informed in advance of the raid.

One Irish hostage managed to escape: electrician Stephen McFaul, who'd worked in North Africa's oil and natural gas fields off and on for 15 years. His family said the militants let hostages call their families to press the kidnappers' demands.

"He phoned me at 9 o'clock to say al-Qaeda were holding him, kidnapped, and to contact the Irish government, for they wanted publicity. Nightmare, so it was. Never want to do it again. He'll not be back! He'll take a job here in Belfast like the rest of us," said his mother, Marie.

No negotiations with militants
Algerian forces who had ringed the Ain Amenas complex had vowed not to negotiate with the militants, who reportedly were seeking safe passage. Security experts said the end of the two-day standoff was in keeping with the North African country's tough approach to terrorism.

Algerian Interior Minister Daho Ould Kabila said the 20-odd militants entered the country from nearby Libya in three vehicles, in an operation commanded by extremist mastermind Moktar Belmoktar, who is normally based in Mali.

"The Algerian authorities have expressed, many times, to the Libyan authorities, its fears and asked it a dozen times to be careful and secure borders with Algeria," Kabila was quoted as saying on the website of the newspaper Echourouk.

The militants made it clear that their attack was fallout from the intervention in Mali. One commander, Oumar Ould Hamaha, said they were now "globalizing the conflict" in revenge for the military assault on Malian soil.

Dueling claims from the military and the militants muddied the world's understanding of an event that angered Western leaders, raised world oil prices and complicated the international military operation in neighboring Mali.
http://www.cbc.ca/ne...atural-gas.html


Edited by Wetcoaster, 17 January 2013 - 05:32 PM.

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#9 canuck_trevor16

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 05:42 PM

should send US Navy SEALS to rescue?
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#10 aeromotacanucks

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 05:58 PM

should send US Navy SEALS to rescue?


Im not sure if USA wants another problem with islamists...

Edited by aeromotacanucks, 17 January 2013 - 06:00 PM.

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#11 Charlie.the.Unicorn

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:15 PM

SEND IN LIAM NEESON!!
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#12 taxi

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:23 PM

I´m not sure if USA wants another problem with islamists...


These people are going to hate the USA regardless of what they do. The only risk the USA runs is if their operation results in the death of innocent civilians from the local area. It would put locals on the side of the islamists.
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#13 Salmonberries

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:31 PM

I here them Westerners are pretty good at takin' care of themselves.

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#14 hockeyfan87

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 07:12 PM

These people are going to hate the USA regardless of what they do. The only risk the USA runs is if their operation results in the death of innocent civilians from the local area. It would put locals on the side of the islamists.


Oh you mean like what's happening in Pakistan with their deliberate drone attacks.
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#15 Dittohead

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 08:25 PM

When the West gets involved, The same folks get mad.
When the West don't get involved, The same folks get mad.


fixed it for you.
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#16 Dittohead

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 08:27 PM

here's some insight...


http://www.liveleak....=7ef_1358465952
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#17 Dittohead

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 08:34 PM

It's Over Looks like Algeria Government plan to end it is to Kill everyone.

http://www.aljazeera...9454517593.html




At least 30 hostages and 11 members of an al-Qaeda-affiliated group were killed when Algerian forces stormed a desert gas plant to free the captives, Reuters news agency has quoted an Algerian security source as saying.
Eight Algerians and seven foreigners, including two British, two Japanese and a French national, were among the dead, the source said.

Algerian state television reported earlier that four foreigners had been killed after the end of the operation was announced late on Thursday.

Communication Minister Mohamed Said said troops had been forced to act after talks with the kidnappers failed.

He said many fighters had been killed in the operation at the In Amenas gas field.

Earlier, a spokesman for the group holding the hostages said 34 of the captives had been killed along with 15 kidnappers as a government helicopter attacked a convoy transporting hostages and their captors.


Edited by Dittohead, 17 January 2013 - 08:35 PM.

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#18 Wetcoaster

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:29 PM

It is now being reported that the raid was botched and at least 30 hostages have been killed. Reports are that the hostages were used as human shields and the Algerian troops were firing indiscriminately and killed a number of hostages.

At least thirty hostages who were being held by Islamist militants in Algeria were killed in a botched air raid by Algerian forces, a security source said Thursday.

The raid, which was carried out in Algerian helicopters and special forces, was meant to wipe out the al-Qaeda-linked militants and free the 41 hostages from at least 10 countries, but instead left up to 30 people, including several Westerns, dead.

Militants said that seven Americans were taken hostage, and claimed only two survived the strafing on Thursday. Sources said that the Obama administration was not aware of the raid ahead of time.

What ensued was bloody chaos at the isolated plant 800 miles south of the capital, Algiers, leaving the fate of many of the captives and the fighters uncertain. In launching its assault, Algeria also ignored offers of help from the SAS and American special forces.

'We asked them not to go in with all guns blazing and they just did it anyway,' said one London official. 'They insisted this was their sovereign territory and it was their operation.'

French sources said the decision to go in was taken because the terrorists were executing hostages. Last night, after a fierce day of fighting, Algerian officials said the rescue operation was over. They said at least 11 Islamist militants, including Tahar Ben Cheneb, a prominent commander in the region, were among the dead, along with three Egyptians, two Tunisians, two Libyans, a Malian and a French citizen.

A source said 30 hostages were killed, of whom the nationalities of 15 had been established. Of these, eight were Algerian and seven were foreigners, including two British, two Japanese and a French national. One Briton was killed when the terrorists seized the gas compound on Wednesday.

Fierce gun battles erupted as troops moved in on the Islamists and there were claims that hostages had been used as human shields. An eyewitness described a scene of carnage, saying: 'There were bodies all over the ground.'


Another spoke of Algerian forces firing at 'anything that moved'.

The Obama administration appeared to be in the dark Thursday about the hostage situation at the natural gas plant deep in the Sahara Desert. An administrative official told the Associated Press that the U.S. was not aware of the raid to free the hostages in advance.

Mr Obama’s administration was offering no details about how many American hostages had been taken and whether they were still in captivity – or even alive. A source told the AP that while some U.S. citizens escaped, others remained missing or unaccounted for.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said U.S. counterterrorism officials were in touch with their Algerian counterparts and that she planned to speak Thursday with Algerian Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal for the second time in as many days. She made a vague reference to ongoing U.S. 'planning,' without elaborating.

'The security of our Americans who are held hostage is our highest priority,' Clinton told reporters. 'Because of the fluidity and the fact that there is a lot of planning going on, I cannot give you any further details.

'This is a serious and sensitive situation,' Pentagon spokesman George Little told reporters traveling with Defense Secretary Leon Panetta in England. Little said military officials were actively seeking information, and that Panetta had been briefed by senior military officials.

Ahead of the raid, U.S. officials had been urging the Algerians to be cautious in their actions, but did not know a rescue mission was planned, said the administration official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.

Militants earlier said they were holding seven Americans, but the administration confirmed only that Americans were among those taken.

'We are deeply concerned about any loss of innocent life and are seeking clarity from the government of Algeria,' White House press secretary Jay Carney told reporters.

During her conversation with Algeria's prime minister Wednesday, Clinton expressed Washington's 'willingness to be helpful,' State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said. They also discussed what type of assistance might be needed, Nuland added, but declined to provide details.

A local worker said from his home Thursday that the Islamist gunmen of the ‘Battalion of Blood’ told the terrified staff that they would not harm Muslims but would kill ‘Christians and infidels.’

Last night, as the military operation to rescue those captured ended, a local worker revealed how the militants appeared to have a clear strategy for their prisoners – some of whom even ended up having explosives strapped to their chest.

The terrorists told us at the very start that they would not hurt Muslims but were only interested in the Christians and infidels,' Abdelkader, 53, told the Mail from his home in the nearby town of In Amenas. '"We will kill them," they said.'

The U.S. government sent an unmanned surveillance drone to the BP-operated site, near the border with Libya and 800 miles (1,290 kilometers) from the Algerian capital, but it could do little more than watch Thursday's intervention. Algeria's army-dominated government, hardened by decades of fighting Islamist militants, shrugged aside foreign offers of help and drove ahead alone.

With the hostage drama entering its second day Thursday, Algerian security forces moved in, first with helicopter fire and then special forces, according to diplomats, a website close to the militants, and an Algerian security official. The government said it was forced to intervene because the militants were being stubborn and wanted to flee with the hostages.

The militants — led by a Mali-based al-Qaida offshoot known as the Masked Brigade — suffered losses in Thursday's military assault, but succeeded in garnering a global audience.

Even violence-scarred Algerians were stunned by the brazen hostage-taking Wednesday, the biggest in northern Africa in years and the first to include Americans as targets. Mass fighting in the 1990s had largely spared the lucrative oil and gas industry that gives Algeria its economic independence and regional weight.

The hostage-taking raised questions about security for sites run by multinationals that are dotted across Africa's largest country. It also raised the prospect of similar attacks on other countries allied against the extremist warlords and drug traffickers who rule a vast patch of desert across several countries in northwest Africa. Even the heavy-handed Algerian response may not deter groups looking for martyrdom and attention.

Casualty figures in the Algerian standoff varied widely. The remote location is extremely hard to reach and was surrounded by Algerian security forces — who, like the militants, are inclined to advertise their successes and minimize their failures.

'An important number of hostages were freed and an important number of terrorists were eliminated, and we regret the few dead and wounded,' Algeria's communications minister, Mohand Said Oubelaid, told national media, adding that the 'terrorists are multinational,' coming from several different countries with the goal of 'destabilizing Algeria, embroiling it in the Mali conflict and damaging its natural gas infrastructure.'

The official news agency said four hostages were killed in Thursday's operation, two Britons and two Filipinos. Two others, a Briton and an Algerian, died Wednesday in an ambush on a bus ferrying foreign workers to an airport. Citing hospital officials, the APS news agency said six Algerians and seven foreigners were injured.

APS said some 600 local workers were safely freed in the raid — but many of those were reportedly released the day before by the militants themselves.

The militants, via a Mauritanian news website, claimed that 35 hostages and 15 militants died in the helicopter strafing. A spokesman for the Masked Brigade told the Nouakchott Information Agency in Mauritania that only seven hostages survived.

By nightfall, Algeria's government said the raid was over. But the whereabouts of the rest of the plant workers was unclear.

President Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron spoke on the phone to share their confusion. White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said the Obama administration was 'seeking clarity from the government of Algeria.'

An unarmed American surveillance drone soared overhead as the Algerian forces closed in, U.S. officials said. The U.S. offered military assistance Wednesday to help rescue the hostages but the Algerian government refused, a U.S. official said in Washington. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the offer.

Militants earlier said they were holding seven Americans, but the administration confirmed only that Americans were among those taken. The U.S. government was in contact with American businesses across North Africa and the Middle East to help them guard against the possibility of copycat attacks

BP, the Norwegian company Statoil and the Algerian state oil company Sonatrach, operate the gas field and a Japanese company, JGC Corp, provides services for the facility.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe protested the military raid as an act that 'threatened the lives of the hostages,' according to a spokesman.
Jean-Christophe Gray, a spokesman for Cameron, said Britain was not informed in advance of the raid.

Diplomats privately described the fiasco as the most serious hostage crisis since Iran seized 52 American officials in 1979.

Norway's prime minister, Jens Stoltenberg, summed up the anger and frustration felt by Western governments and said too he had been in constant contact with Mr Sellal.

'My message was that concern for the lives and health of the hostages had to go first,' he said. 'That was also the attitude of David Cameron. Our desire was that they showed restraint.

'We all feel deep anxiety of not knowing what has happened to our citizens and the other hostages. I feel for the families. What has happened is abominable.'

The militant group believed to be holding the hostages has claimed that it carried out the attack in retaliation for the French military intervention against Al Qaeda-backed rebels in neighbouring Mali.

NOTE - graphic photos at the link.
http://www.dailymail...o=feeds-newsxml
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#19 Dittohead

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 10:19 PM

^^ Old news
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#20 MoneypuckOverlord

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 11:11 PM

sad news. very very very sad news. There's really nothing anyone else in the world can do. It is impossible for anyone to save these hostages to some extent. Maybe some lives would have been saved if a special force group went in, such us the Navy seals, or even our very own JTF2. It's a very tough operation, and very risky.
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combine results.  Ehlers 5'11 162 lbs of solid rock.  


#21 Wetcoaster

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 11:54 PM

^^ Old news

Nope... more detailed news.
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#22 Buggernut

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:26 AM

If there is one silver lining to the tragic outcome, maybe it'll send a message to the terrorists that hostage taking is not effective.

Oh, and maybe, just maybe, the governments of the victims' countries will issue an advisory to their citizens not to go to these craphole countries, even if there is a crapload of oil there.
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#23 Salmonberries

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:25 AM

If there is one silver lining to the tragic outcome, maybe it'll send a message to the terrorists that hostage taking is not effective.

Oh, and maybe, just maybe, the governments of the victims' countries will issue an advisory to their citizens not to go to these craphole countries, even if there is a crapload of oil there.

Don't need oil anyway.....we can run our cars on crap.

http://crave.cnet.co...in-uk-50000253/


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#24 Wetcoaster

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 03:06 PM

Death toll is now at 81. It seems this was not payback for French troops being deployed in Mali as the operation was planned well before it was decided to send in French troops.


The death toll from the bloody terrorist siege at a natural gas plant in the Sahara climbed to at least 81 on Sunday, as Algerian forces searching the complex for explosives found dozens more bodies.


Many of the bodies were so badly disfigured they could not immediately be identified, a security official said.


Algerian special forces stormed the facility on Saturday to end the four-day siege of the remote desert refinery, and the government said then that 32 militants and 23 hostages were killed, but that the death toll was likely to rise.


The militants came from six countries, were armed to cause maximum destruction and mined the Ain Amenas refinery, which the Algerian state oil company runs along with BP and Norway's Statoil, said Algerian Communications Minister Mohamed Said. The militants "had decided to succeed in the operation as planned, to blow up the gas complex and kill all the hostages," he said in a state radio interview.


In addition to the bodies found at the site Sunday, a wounded Romanian who had been evacuated and brought home died, raised the overall death toll to at least 81.


British Prime Minister David Cameron said Sunday three Britons were among those killed in the raid on Saturday and that another three were believed dead, as is a British resident.


"People will ask questions about the Algerian response to these events, but I would just say that the responsibility for these deaths lies squarely with the terrorists who launched a vicious and cowardly attack," Cameron said.


Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird denounced the "deplorable and cowardly attacks" and said Ottawa is closely monitoring the situation.


“While the full scale and exact details of the situation remain unclear, Canadian officials remain in close contact with Algerian authorities to seek further information," he said in a statement on Saturday.


“The thoughts and prayers of our entire country are with the families and friends of the innocent lives lost," he said.


The minister said it's believed no Canadians or dual nationals were among the hostages and a permanent resident of Canada who was at the site is safe and has left Algeria.


With few details emerging from the remote site of the gas plant in eastern Algeria, it was unclear whether anyone was rescued in the final operation, but the number of hostages killed Saturday — seven —was how many the militants had said that morning they still had.


Search for explosives


The squads were sweeping the plant in the Sahara Desert to defuse mines they said were planted throughout the vast site, not far from the Libyan border.


The siege at Ain Amenas transfixed the world after radical Islamists linked to al-Qaeda stormed the complex on Wednesday, which contained hundreds of plant workers from all over the world.


The Algerian military and its attack helicopters surrounded the complex for four tense days that were punctuated with gun battles and dramatic tales of escape.


"They had decided to succeed in the operation as planned, to blow up the gas complex and kill all the hostages," said Communications Minister Mohamed Said, speaking on a state radio interview.


Authorities said the bloody takeover was carried by 32 men from six countries, under the command from afar of the one-eyed Algerian bandit Moktar Belmoktar, founder of the Masked Brigade, based in neighboring Mali. The attacking force called itself "Those Who Sign in Blood."


The militants initially said the operation was payback for French military intervention in neighboring Mali, where al-Qaeda-linked rebels are on the march, but later they said it was two months in the planning, long before France sent in troops.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...a-reaction.html

Edited by Wetcoaster, 20 January 2013 - 03:08 PM.

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#25 Dittohead

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 03:34 PM

If there is one silver lining to the tragic outcome, maybe it'll send a message to the terrorists that hostage taking is not effective.

Oh, and maybe, just maybe, the governments of the victims' countries will issue an advisory to their citizens not to go to these craphole countries, even if there is a crapload of oil there.


The islamics only care about causing chaos. they are quite happy to die and kill infidels.
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#26 DarthNinja

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 05:14 PM

it's a little ironic given how the west were supporting these people to overthrow the libyan government.

Now libya is a failed state, mali will soon become one. And islamists have gained a major footstep in a strategic area and access to unlimited weapons.


Good job NATO.


Ghaddafi was disposed of once he declared he would go head to head against the USD federal reserve in Africa by creating a new currency backed by gold and he would issue interest-free loans to African nations. This, on top of building his new satellites that would result in the loss of over 1/2 trillion $ every year to certain other nations' interests (who conveniently are part of NATO).

Yes we hear that France sent troops to Mali to fight those dastardly 'Mali Islamists' who obviously have their sights set on world domination and instilling Shari'ah law across the world once they are finished with Mali. Right. France is supported by Britain and the USA in this operation.

Of course what most people so 'in tune with reality' fail to realize is the fact that Germany put France, Britain and the USA on notice to demand the repatriation of 674 tonnes of gold it was storing in France, Britain and the USA! Now those countries are collectively militarily attacking one of the most gold-rich nations in the world.

Unbelievable how blind the world is.
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#27 Wetcoaster

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 01:43 PM

It is now being reported that there were two Canadians among the hostage takers NOT the hostages.


The Islamist militants who attacked a natural gas plant in the Sahara included two Canadians and a team of explosives experts who had memorized the layout of the sprawling complex and were ready to blow the place sky-high, Algeria's prime minister says.


Abdelmalek Sellal did not say Monday whether the Canadians were among the 29 militants killed by Algerian forces that stormed the site, or the three who were captured alive. At least 37 hostages died in the attack, with five more unaccounted for, according to Algeria.


There have been changing reports about the numbers and profiles of those involved.



The militants had said during the four-day standoff that their band included people from Canada.


Reuters reported that Sellal said a Canadian co-ordinated the attack, giving the militant's name only as Chedad.


The kidnappers came from Egypt, Canada, Mali, Niger, Mauritania and Tunisia, the prime minister said.


Other news reports have cited security sources as saying two Canadians were among the hostage-takers. Some of the hostages who had escaped recalled hearing at least one of the militants speaking English with a North American accent.


Ottawa seeking more information


As of Monday morning, there has been no official communication between the Algerian and Canadian governments about the identity or the nationality of any of the hostage takers, the Prime Minister's Office told CBC News.


The Canadian government said earlier Monday it's aware of reports that Canadians may have been involved in the hostage incident at the Ain Amenas natural gas plant.



"We are pursuing all appropriate channels to seek further information and are in close contact with Algerian authorities," foreign affairs spokeswoman Chrystiane Roy told CBC News on Monday.


"Canada condemns in the strongest possible terms this deplorable and cowardly attack and all terrorist groups which seek to create and perpetuate insecurity in the Sahel countries of West Africa."


Meanwhile, Foreign Affairs said this weekend it believes no Canadians or dual nationals were among the hostages. A permanent resident of Canada who was at the site is safe and has left Algeria.


Attack planned for 2 months


The Algerian prime minister, speaking to reporters in the capital of Algiers on Monday, said a number of the hostages were found killed with a bullet to the head.


The militants wore Algerian army uniforms, and included a team of explosives experts ready to blow up the place, he said. The group "knew the facility's layout by heart," Sellal added.


"Their goal was to kidnap foreigners," the prime minister said. "They wanted to flee to Mali with the foreigners but once they were surrounded they started killing the first hostages."


The facility had 790 Algerian workers and 134 foreigners from 26 countries, he said. Algeria says 685 Algerian workers and 107 foreign workers were freed.


The Algerians were released early in the standoff — former hostages said the attackers immediately separated out the foreigners, forcing some to wear explosive belts.



A former driver at the natural gas complex, originally from Niger, was among the band of al-Qaeda-linked militants, Sellal said.


Sellal said the heavily armed militants came from neighbouring Mali carrying a great deal of explosives and mined the facility. They had prepared the attack for two months.


The operation was led by an Algerian, Amine Benchenab, who was known to security services, he added.


Authorities have said the attack was under the command from afar of the one-eyed Algerian bandit Moktar Belmoktar, founder of the Masked Brigade, based in Mali.


Armed with heavy machine-guns, rocket launchers, missiles and grenades, the militants singled out foreign workers — from countries including Japan, Britain, the Philippines and Romania — at the plant, killing some of them on the spot and attaching explosive belts to others.


Algerian forces stormed the gas plant on Saturday, bringing the four-day hostage situation to a violent end. Algerian authorities began searching the refinery for explosive traps left behind by the attackers and found dozens more bodies.


At least 25 more bodies were found Sunday, but many were so badly disfigured that it was unclear whether they were hostages or militants, a security official said.


Some hostages still missing


Confirmed dead so far include:


Six from the Philippines.

Three from Britain.

Two from Romania.

One from France.

Three from the U.S.

Seven from Japan.


Algeria says five foreign hostages remain missing, but other governments say that figure is too low.


Japan's prime minister said Monday that seven Japanese citizens were confirmed dead at the gas plant. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said that three other Japanese are still missing.


Three Americans were killed during the hostage-taking but seven made it out safely, an Obama administration official said Monday. The FBI has recovered the bodies of the Americans and notified their families, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity because he wasn't authorized to speak publicly about the matter.



The deceased Americans were identified as Victor Lynn Lovelady and Gordon Lee Rowan, the official said. One American death was confirmed Friday, that of Texas resident Frederick Buttaccio.


Many other hostages remain unaccounted for, including five Norwegian employees of Statoil, the energy company said Sunday. The U.K. government said three other Britons and a Colombian who lived in the U.K. are still missing.


Four Filipino workers are unaccounted for, said a government spokesman in Manila, and two Malaysians are missing, its government said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2013/01/21/algeria-hostage-canadians.html
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To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

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#28 Dittohead

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 03:03 PM

I'm sure we paid for their education too.

of course its not payback, they can't react that quickly.

Edited by Dittohead, 21 January 2013 - 03:05 PM.

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#29 Wetcoaster

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:28 AM

RCMP have been deployed to Algeria to investigate claims by the Algerian government that two Canadians were involved with the hostage takers.

Given that the RCMP would have a problem investigating its way out of a sack if you opened one end and pointed them in the correct direction, I do not see much value.

No word if they have been equipped with tasers.

RCMP officers are in Algeria in the wake of a deadly hostage situation in the north African country, CBC News has confirmed.

The deployment comes one day after Prime Minister Stephen Harper said the government was seeking more information to substantiate claims by Algerian Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal that two Canadian nationals were among the group of al-Qaeda-linked militants who took hundreds prisoner at a natural gas processing complex in the Sahara.

"We have no substantial information at the present time on these particular individuals, but obviously we will continue to work with the government of Algeria to find out more about this particular matter," Harper said at a press conference in Cambridge, Ont., on Wednesday.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...ia-hostage.html
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To err is human - but to really screw up you need a computer.

Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati

Illegitimi non carborundum.

Never try to teach a pig to sing - it wastes your time and annoys the pig.




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