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Six New Federal Ridings Added in B.C.


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#1 Wetcoaster

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 01:08 PM

Of the six new federal BC ridings, five of them are being added in the Lower Mainland and that has necessitated some substantial re-drawing of boundaries and only three BC ridings will remain unchanged.

Why now?



Canada's federal electoral map is changing

Every 10 years, after the census is conducted, the number of electoral districts and their boundaries are revised to reflect population shifts and growth. Your electoral district – which is where you live and vote for your member of Parliament – may change as a result of the redistribution process.

Ten electoral boundaries commissions have been established. They operate independently in each province to propose new boundaries, consult with Canadians and create the new electoral map for their province.

Commissions are not required for Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut since each territory is a single electoral district.

http://www.redecoupage-federal-redistribution.ca/content.asp?document=home&lang=e

In BC the electoral boundaries commission is chaired by Justice John E. Hall of the British Columbia Court of Appeal along with members Stewart Ladyman and Dr. J. Peter Meekison.
http://www.redecoupa...nt=index&lang=e

Here is the Commission's Report for BC:
http://www.redecoupa...nt=index&lang=e



B.C.’s federal political boundaries have been substantially redrawn in the Lower Mainland in a report submitted Monday to Canada’s chief electoral officer.


Because six new electoral districts are being added, five of those in the Lower Mainland, the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for British Columbia was able to preserve the original boundaries of only three existing ridings.


Those were Vancouver East, Victoria and Okanagan-Shuswap (renamed North Okanagan-Shuswap).


Only minor changes were made to ridings in northern B.C. and the Interior, but the commission made major adjustments elsewhere, including on Vancouver Island, which would get one new riding. There are currently 36 federal ridings.


In some instances, initially proposed boundaries were altered after feedback from the public, said Justice John Hall, chairman of the B.C. commission.


In Surrey, for example, boundaries were redrawn in Surrey Centre and the Newton area because they weren’t originally drawn up the best way possible.


MPs will now be given a chance to express their views on the changes to a parliamentary committee during the next month or two, forwarding objections, if any, to the commission.


The commission will consider MPs’ views but will have the final say on the boundaries, which will likely be decided before summer.


The commission tried to strike a balance between keeping to the population standard of 105,000 people per electoral district and retaining natural and historical community boundaries, Hall said Monday.


“Sometimes people agree with you, sometimes they disagree with you. We tried to take account of (public feedback) as much as we reasonably could, but sometimes there’s just sort of choices that are less bad,” he said.


In Vancouver, the riding of Vancouver-Granville was added but changes to the original proposals were not that dramatic, added Hall.


However, the proposed electoral district of Burnaby North-Seymour — which includes Burnaby North and part of North Vancouver — was virtually unchanged from the initial proposed boundaries, despite public opposition.


Hall acknowledged those new riding boundaries might not be welcomed.


NDP MP Kennedy Stewart, who holds the riding of Burnaby-Douglas, part of which is being carved up for the new riding of Burnaby-Seymour, is not happy with the changes.


He said the Burnaby riding changes faced stiff opposition in Burnaby and North Vancouver because they are separated by the Burrard Inlet and don’t form a natural constituency. A telephone survey of 2,000 people conducted by his office found 80 per cent of north Burnaby and North Vancouver residents opposed the new riding, he said. “My community is upset, North Vancouver is upset.”


Stewart, who won the previous election by a margin of just two per cent, said if people were to vote the same way under the new boundaries, he would lose by seven per cent.


Michael Pal, co-founder of the Voter Equality initiative to help everyday Canadians understand the process, said B.C. and Alberta fared well in the redrawing of the electoral map.


“It’s usually the urban and suburban areas that are under-represented, so redrawing the map every 10 years is a way to help those places with population growth so you actually have voter equality,” said Pal, who is also a fellow at the University of Toronto’s Mowat Centre policy think-tank.


With the addition of five electoral districts, there are now 26 in the Lower Mainland, representing nearly two thirds of the province’s ridings.


Ridings were also added in the Richmond-Delta and Langley-Cloverdale areas.


B.C.’s population has increased to 4.4 million from 3.9 million since the electoral boundaries were last redrawn in 2002.


Once electoral boundary changes are in place, Canada’s ridings will have increased to 338 from 308.

http://www.vancouversun.com/federal+ridings+added/7885010/story.html#ixzz2JOdq8x3L
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#2 Violator

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 01:27 PM

Burnaby-Seymour was the old riding at least according to Wikipedia this Kennedy Stewart fellow should realize that riding's change as his ridding has only been active since 1997.

http://en.wikipedia....rnaby—Seymour
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#3 Wetcoaster

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:35 PM

Burnaby-Seymour was the old riding at least according to Wikipedia this Kennedy Stewart fellow should realize that riding's change as his ridding has only been active since 1997.

http://en.wikipedia....byâ€"Seymour

He is a "Dipper" so what can you expect?? ::D
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#4 bolt

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:44 PM

What a waste of taxpayer money. We add 6 backbenchers just for BC , probably adding over $2 million in extra costs per year . Add up the 30 extra MPs and the figure goes to $30-50 million in extra costs. Over a 10 year time frame this equates to a half a billion dollars of total waste; There is no net benefit to this. There is only so much time allocated during a house sitting so why add to it. They should subtract and make the ridings more centralized. And we wonder why we are taxed so much.

Edited by bolt, 29 January 2013 - 02:47 PM.

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#5 Wetcoaster

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 03:49 PM

What a waste of taxpayer money. We add 6 backbenchers just for BC , probably adding over $2 million in extra costs per year . Add up the 30 extra MPs and the figure goes to $30-50 million in extra costs. Over a 10 year time frame this equates to a half a billion dollars of total waste; There is no net benefit to this. There is only so much time allocated during a house sitting so why add to it. They should subtract and make the ridings more centralized. And we wonder why we are taxed so much.

The problem that certain provinces have a guaranteed minimum number of MP's constitutionally and one of the principles enshrined in Canadian history is "rep by pop" so as the population grows in other provinces, the only means of adhering to the ratio of constituents to MPs is to give the growing regions more MPs as you cannot cut back in the no/low growth provinces.

Per subsection 51 (1) of the Constitution Act 1867:

51. (1) The number of members of the House of Commons and the representation of the provinces therein shall, on the completion of each decennial census, be readjusted by such authority, in such manner, and from such time as the Parliament of Canada provides from time to time, subject and according to the following rules:


Rules


1. There shall be assigned to each of the provinces a number of members equal to the number obtained by dividing the population of the province by the electoral quotient and rounding up any fractional remainder to one.


2. If the number of members assigned to a province by the application of rule 1 and section 51A is less than the total number assigned to that province on the date of the coming into force of the Constitution Act, 1985 (Representation), there shall be added to the number of members so assigned such number of members as will result in the province having the same number of members as were assigned on that date.


3. After the application of rules 1 and 2 and section 51A, there shall, in respect of each province that meets the condition set out in rule 4, be added, if necessary, a number of members such that, on the completion of the readjustment, the number obtained by dividing the number of members assigned to that province by the total number of members assigned to all the provinces is as close as possible to, without being below, the number obtained by dividing the population of that province by the total population of all the provinces.


4. Rule 3 applies to a province if, on the completion of the preceding readjustment, the number obtained by dividing the number of members assigned to that province by the total number of members assigned to all the provinces was equal to or greater than the number obtained by dividing the population of that province by the total population of all the prov-inces, the population of each province being its population as at July 1 of the year of the decennial census that preceded that readjustment according to the estimates prepared for the purpose of that readjustment.


5. Unless the context indicates otherwise, in these rules, the population of a province is the estimate of its population as at July 1 of the year of the most recent decennial census.


6. In these rules, “electoral quotient” means

(a) 111,166, in relation to the readjustment following the completion of the 2011 decennial census, and

(b) in relation to the readjustment following the completion of any subsequent decennial census, the number obtained by multiplying the electoral quotient that was applied in the preceding readjustment by the number that is the average of the numbers obtained by dividing the population of each province by the population of the province as at July 1 of the year of the preceding decennial census according to the estimates prepared for the purpose of the preceding readjustment, and rounding up any fractional remainder of that multiplication to one.


Population estimates


(1.1) For the purpose of the rules in subsection (1), there is required to be prepared an estimate of the population of Canada and of each province as at July 1, 2001 and July 1, 2011 — and, in each year following the 2011 decennial census in which a decennial census is taken, as at July 1 of that year — by such authority, in such manner, and from such time as the Parliament of Canada provides from time to time.


Edited by Wetcoaster, 29 January 2013 - 03:50 PM.

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#6 Dittohead

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 04:37 PM

Of the six new federal BC ridings, five of them are being added in the Lower Mainland and that has necessitated some substantial re-drawing of boundaries and only three BC ridings will remain unchanged.

Why now?






The answer is right at the beginning...


Every 10 years, after the census is conducted, the number of electoral districts and their boundaries are revised to reflect population shifts and growth. Your electoral district – which is where you live and vote for your member of Parliament – may change as a result of the redistribution process.

Ten electoral boundaries commissions have been established. They operate independently in each province to propose new boundaries, consult with Canadians and create the new electoral map for their province.
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#7 Wetcoaster

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 08:31 PM

The answer is right at the beginning...


Every 10 years, after the census is conducted, the number of electoral districts and their boundaries are revised to reflect population shifts and growth. Your electoral district – which is where you live and vote for your member of Parliament – may change as a result of the redistribution process.

Ten electoral boundaries commissions have been established. They operate independently in each province to propose new boundaries, consult with Canadians and create the new electoral map for their province.

UHHHHHHHHH????

Yes that is why I supplied the answer in the body of my post. The question was posed in the the form of a rhetorical question and the information below operated as the answer. :picard:
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#8 Buggernut

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:24 PM

Great. Now do we have proportionately as many seats as Quebec?
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#9 Wetcoaster

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:58 PM

Great. Now do we have proportionately as many seats as Quebec?

As it stands, Quebec has 75 federal ridings and 3 more are being added.
http://www.cbc.ca/ne...boundaries.html


The census figures reveal that Quebec’s population of 7,903,001, now represents 23.6 per cent of the total Canadian population, down from 23.9 per cent of the country’s population in 2006.


Quebec remains the second largest province in Canada, and its population is still growing, but its share of the country’s overall population has gradually decreased from 28.9 per cent in 1951, while neighbouring Ontario has seen its share rise to 38.4 per cent from 32.8 per cent.


BC at the last census has a population of 4,400,057 representing 13.1 per cent of the population.

After re-distribution:

Quebec will have 78 seats out of 338 so 23.07 per cent

BC will have 42 seats out of 338 so 12.42%
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Always listen to experts. They'll tell you what can't be done and why. Then do it.

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#10 KoreanHockeyFan

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 06:50 PM

Wow, Burnaby went under some big changes. Oh well, Peter Julian's still got my riding in the bag, but it looks like Burnaby North is no longer going to be orange though.
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