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nux4lyfe

BBQ'n thick steaks..

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Make sure the steaks are at room temperature,

This recipe works well with steaks from 1 1/2 inches on up. Just adjust the cooking time and if you really want to be sure use an instant read thermometer to check the centre. The temperatures noted below will rise about 5 degrees as the steak rests for 5 minutes, I wrap my steak in foil and then in a towel to stay warm.

Medium rare (126 degrees F core temp): Cooked to a red warm centre. No part of the steak is cold and very little of the steaks juices have been cooked away. This is how I like my steak.

Medium (135 degrees F core temp): The centre is hot and red surrounded by pink. The outside is brown and fully cooked. Medium has every part of the steak is piping hot when eaten.

Anything more and you cook the juices out.

Here is a standard pan sear recipe (cast iron pan or grill pan) that starts on the stove top and finishes in the oven (a standard technique used by restaurants for thick steaks) - Just make sure that the steaks dried and then are very LIGHTLY oiled - I use grape seed oil as it has a much higher smoking point than canola oil. Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper after oiling. http://www.foodnetwo...cipe/index.html

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sear directly over the coals and then move it to the cool area of your grill to finish the doneness.

10 min rest is fine, tented under foil.

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Gotta turn the heat up to max to cook the inside - low temperatures won't reach the centre very fast unfortunately. Just crank the hit up and flip them often. Should take around 10-12 minutes.

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It would be helpful to know the cut and approximate thickness as fat content (depending on cut) and thickness can effect cooking times and methods.

My personal favourite is a filet mignon or "baseball" steak which tend to be closer to 1.5"+ thick.

As other posters have noted, bring it out of the fridge for a while (+/- 1 hour) to get up to room temperature. A good steak should require very minimal seasoning/no marinade (marinade is for tenderizing tougher, cheaper cuts of steak). Minutes before cooking I might (optional) splash a bit of the red wine (that you should be enjoying with your steak) on, some fresh ground pepper and some EVOO.

Get your BBQ as hot as you can and sear for about 2 minutes over full flame then turn one burner down to low and cook steak on the low flame side for another 4-5 minutes. Turn burner back up and sear other side for another 2 minutes and turn down burner again and cook for another 4 minutes. Remove from grill and rest under tented tinfoil for 5-10 minutes. YUMMMM

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Awful advice. The higher the heat the fast the outside will cook. For a really thick steak you want to be able to cook some of the inside before the outside is burnt.

You need to start with high heat to get that nice charcoal on the outside, then switch to a low heat to allow the inside to cook. If the steak is really thick, I'd even suggest putting them in the oven for a couple of minutes after pulling them off the bbq.

Keep in mind this is if you don't want very rare on the inside. Also depends on the cut of meat. If you have a marbled meat or fatty meat, you'll definitely want to cook them on a low temperature for at least a part of the process. It'll melt all that goodness into the meat and get rid of random fatty bits.

I'd suggest this, for best taste, if the steak is really thick, and you want it cooked more than medium rare:

1) Sear steak in garlic butter

2) Cook 4-5 minutes on each side on the bbq on high

3) Throw in oven until reached desired level of cooked on the inside

4) Throw back on BBQ 30 seconds a side

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4) Disconnect oven so as to avoid desire to put meat into it. The oven is for cookies, not meat.

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Hahah...that made me laugh! :lol:

Seriously though, the oven CAN be a great way to finish up meat. One of my favourite chicken methods is to pan sear the chicken for 2 minutes per side in butter (plus whatever seasoning/herbs etc you'd like) and then finish up in the oven for ~6 minutes (depending on thickness). Delicious, crispy outside and moist and tender inside....mmmm

No reason you couldn't do the same with steak, I just happen to like the flame grilled flavour.

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I have a convection toaster oven that works surprisingly well in that regard. It's nice too as you're not running a big-jebus 240V oven for a couple little pieces of meat. It also cost a LOT less than a full size convection oven.

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sooo, whats up with you guys and your gas grills.... you might as well just use an oven as the water vapour from your flames will prevent any decent smoke flavour from penetrating your meat.

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I love charcoal...certainly better flavour. But it's a messy PITA

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I love charcoal...certainly better flavour. But it's a messy PITA

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sooo, whats up with you guys and your gas grills.... you might as well just use an oven as the water vapour from your flames will prevent any decent smoke flavour from penetrating your meat.

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Unless you have a high quality convection oven where you can keep the temperature steady (the problem with convential ovens is they swing up and down in temperature) it would make me cry to put a roast in the oven.

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Which is why restaurants do low temperature roasting for roasts - I do the same at home. Long and slow. And you get superb results even with cheaper cuts of beef. Just make sure your roast is at room temperature before it goes in the oven.

Here is how to do a Prime Rib Roast low and slow - this is how many restaurants do their Prime Rib.

http://www.seriousea...eef-recipe.html

The only change I make is because the the roasting process takes hours, I season just before the roast goes in the oven. And I use a probe thermometer to get to the perfect temperature.

ft107s1.jpg

http://www.leevalley...t=2,40733,44734

And the result???

Commandment I: Perfect Crust? Check.

Commandment II: No Gray Zone? Check.

Commandment III: Full-on Juiciness? Check.

20091218-rib-roast-no-gray.jpg

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Yup, but that's the problem. You have to have a really good oven. A conventional one won't be able to hold the low temperature as the elements keeping having to turn off and on which results in the temperature fluctuating. The ol' probe thermometer will show that.

I actually just cooked a nice 4 rib prime rib on the Q and I assure you it was terrific. I actually got up at five in the morning to take it out so that it would warm up and had it on low and slow by 9:30 in the morning.

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Yup, but that's the problem. You have to have a really good oven. A conventional one won't be able to hold the low temperature as the elements keeping having to turn off and on which results in the temperature fluctuating. The ol' probe thermometer will show that.

I actually just cooked a nice 4 rib prime rib on the Q and I assure you it was terrific. I actually got up at five in the morning to take it out so that it would warm up and had it on low and slow by 9:30 in the morning.

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Also helps to use good cookware. A nice cast iron Le Creuset say "Oval French Oven" will do wonders to ensure a nice steady, even temperature regardless of your crappty oven ;)

388631e.jpg

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Also helps to use good cookware. A nice cast iron Le Creuset say "Oval French Oven" will do wonders to ensure a nice steady, even temperature regardless of your crappty oven ;)

388631e.jpg

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Ya but won't you end up steaming it if you leave the lid on?

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