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BBQ'n thick steaks..


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#31 J.R.

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:30 AM

I love charcoal...certainly better flavour. But it's a messy PITA
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#32 avelanch

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:33 AM

I love charcoal...certainly better flavour. But it's a messy PITA

i don't find an issue, it's great food for my garden (i only use natural chunk hardwood charcoal and no lighter fluid, so it's chemical free).
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#33 ronthecivil

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:59 AM

sooo, whats up with you guys and your gas grills.... you might as well just use an oven as the water vapour from your flames will prevent any decent smoke flavour from penetrating your meat.


Not all of us have places you can use a charcoal grill and as noted for those that do it's a PITA.

I could see going to the bother of lighting up charcoal if your say doing some ribs or something.

For roasts I do offset cooking and put a can of hickory chips in there (and refill it when I turn the roast 2/3 of the way through) and I can assure you that the roast and the drippings are very, very smokey with a nice crust and what not.

Make no mistake one day when I am a millionaire I will have a nice custom charcoal smoker and a 5k Teck BBQ for the rest (and a convection gas oven in the kitchen) but as it turns out I am not a millionaire yet.
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#34 Wetcoaster

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:59 AM

Unless you have a high quality convection oven where you can keep the temperature steady (the problem with convential ovens is they swing up and down in temperature) it would make me cry to put a roast in the oven.

Which is why restaurants do low temperature roasting for roasts - I do the same at home. Long and slow. And you get superb results even with cheaper cuts of beef. Just make sure your roast is at room temperature before it goes in the oven.

Here is how to do a Prime Rib Roast low and slow - this is how many restaurants do their Prime Rib.
http://www.seriousea...eef-recipe.html

The only change I make is because the the roasting process takes hours, I season just before the roast goes in the oven. And I use a probe thermometer to get to the perfect temperature.

Posted Image
http://www.leevalley...t=2,40733,44734


And the result???


Commandment I: Perfect Crust? Check.
Commandment II: No Gray Zone? Check.
Commandment III: Full-on Juiciness? Check.

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#35 ronthecivil

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:07 PM

Which is why restaurants do low temperature roasting for roasts - I do the same at home. Long and slow. And you get superb results even with cheaper cuts of beef. Just make sure your roast is at room temperature before it goes in the oven.

Here is how to do a Prime Rib Roast low and slow - this is how many restaurants do their Prime Rib.
http://www.seriousea...eef-recipe.html

The only change I make is because the the roasting process takes hours, I season just before the roast goes in the oven. And I use a probe thermometer to get to the perfect temperature.

Posted Image
http://www.leevalley...t=2,40733,44734


And the result???


Commandment I: Perfect Crust? Check.
Commandment II: No Gray Zone? Check.
Commandment III: Full-on Juiciness? Check.

Posted Image


Yup, but that's the problem. You have to have a really good oven. A conventional one won't be able to hold the low temperature as the elements keeping having to turn off and on which results in the temperature fluctuating. The ol' probe thermometer will show that.

I actually just cooked a nice 4 rib prime rib on the Q and I assure you it was terrific. I actually got up at five in the morning to take it out so that it would warm up and had it on low and slow by 9:30 in the morning.
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#36 Wetcoaster

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:15 PM

Yup, but that's the problem. You have to have a really good oven. A conventional one won't be able to hold the low temperature as the elements keeping having to turn off and on which results in the temperature fluctuating. The ol' probe thermometer will show that.

I actually just cooked a nice 4 rib prime rib on the Q and I assure you it was terrific. I actually got up at five in the morning to take it out so that it would warm up and had it on low and slow by 9:30 in the morning.

No you do not need a really good oven. Just a a good oven thermometer so that you can make sure your oven tops out at 200 degrees Fahrenheit - slow roasting takes place at 150 to 200 degrees so if the oven cycles a few degrees lower before coming back up to temperature, no problem.
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#37 J.R.

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:35 PM

Yup, but that's the problem. You have to have a really good oven. A conventional one won't be able to hold the low temperature as the elements keeping having to turn off and on which results in the temperature fluctuating. The ol' probe thermometer will show that.

I actually just cooked a nice 4 rib prime rib on the Q and I assure you it was terrific. I actually got up at five in the morning to take it out so that it would warm up and had it on low and slow by 9:30 in the morning.

No you do not need a really good oven. Just a a good oven thermometer so that you can make sure your oven tops out at 200 degrees Fahrenheit - slow roasting takes place at 150 to 200 degrees so if the oven cycles a few degrees lower before coming back up to temperature, no problem.


Also helps to use good cookware. A nice cast iron Le Creuset say "Oval French Oven" will do wonders to ensure a nice steady, even temperature regardless of your crappty oven ;)

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#38 ronthecivil

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:40 PM

Also helps to use good cookware. A nice cast iron Le Creuset say "Oval French Oven" will do wonders to ensure a nice steady, even temperature regardless of your crappty oven ;)

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Ya but won't you end up steaming it if you leave the lid on?
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#39 Wetcoaster

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:41 PM

Also helps to use good cookware. A nice cast iron Le Creuset say "Oval French Oven" will do wonders to ensure a nice steady, even temperature regardless of your crappty oven ;)

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Only if you want to braise and not roast.
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#40 J.R.

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:46 PM

Ya but won't you end up steaming it if you leave the lid on?

Only if you want to braise and not roast.


Ron, braise vs roast as Wet noted.

And for the record, even with the lid off, the thick cast iron on 5 of 6 sides still does a heck of a job evening out the temp of the minor fluctuations particularly when roasting around the 200F mark as Wet noted in his other post.

Edited by J.R., 19 February 2013 - 12:47 PM.

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#41 jmfaminoff

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:46 PM

Pit smoke using green oak, put a highly rubbed brisket in at 230 for as much as 18-hours. Every couple of hours drown in your mop sauce and you will have magic in your mouth.

Edited by jmfaminoff, 19 February 2013 - 12:48 PM.

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#42 Wetcoaster

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:48 PM

Ron, braise vs roast as Wet noted.

And for the record, even with the lid off, the thick cast iron on 5 of 6 sides still does a heck of a job evening out the temp of the minor fluctuations particularly when roasting around the 200F mark as Wet noted in his other post.

I use a v-roast pan.

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#43 avelanch

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:49 PM

Yup, but that's the problem. You have to have a really good oven. A conventional one won't be able to hold the low temperature as the elements keeping having to turn off and on which results in the temperature fluctuating. The ol' probe thermometer will show that.

I actually just cooked a nice 4 rib prime rib on the Q and I assure you it was terrific. I actually got up at five in the morning to take it out so that it would warm up and had it on low and slow by 9:30 in the morning.

which is why you should get a gas oven, much more even cooking temp.

also, a pizza stone or a couple foil lined bricks do wonders to evening out electric oven temps.

Edited by avelanch, 19 February 2013 - 12:51 PM.

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#44 J.R.

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:56 PM

Yeah I second the pizza stone as well. Ours pretty much lives in our oven for just that reason.

Great for pizza too!! ...lol

Edited by J.R., 19 February 2013 - 12:56 PM.

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#45 Wetcoaster

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:16 PM

which is why you should get a gas oven, much more even cooking temp.

also, a pizza stone or a couple foil lined bricks do wonders to evening out electric oven temps.

Or get a top quality electric range.
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#46 Snake Doctor

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:18 PM

Anyone got the formula, I'm trying to grill some steaks but since they are so thick, I have no idea how to go about them, Google want's me to read essay's that I don't have time for, so if anyone has it pat down plz help me out, about the temp and cooking mins, Thanks!


My Suggestion is this. Highest heat for little time. So 5 min a side on the bbq.
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#47 ronthecivil

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:32 PM

Ron, braise vs roast as Wet noted.

And for the record, even with the lid off, the thick cast iron on 5 of 6 sides still does a heck of a job evening out the temp of the minor fluctuations particularly when roasting around the 200F mark as Wet noted in his other post.


As it turns out I have cast iron pots like that so I could give it a try.
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#48 avelanch

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:52 PM

Or get a top quality electric range.

it's cheaper to go gas, or keep your cheap oven plus bricks...

I didn't even know they had "high end" electric ovens... I always thought that's what gas ovens were for. :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot:

Edited by avelanch, 19 February 2013 - 01:52 PM.

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#49 avelanch

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:55 PM

As it turns out I have cast iron pots like that so I could give it a try.

you mean a dutch oven? it's great for braising a roast. I make a mean yankee pot roast in mine.
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#50 Wetcoaster

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:00 PM

it's cheaper to go gas, or keep your cheap oven plus bricks...

I didn't even know they had "high end" electric ovens... I always thought that's what gas ovens were for. :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot:

Lots of restaurants use electric ovens.
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#51 taxi

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:40 PM

1) Buy a better BBQ
2) Use the infrared grill to sear the meat.
3) Do the 4-5 mins a side.
4) Disconnect oven so as to avoid desire to put meat into it. The oven is for cookies, not meat.


With an ultra thick cut of meat, the only way to cook it is in the oven or the BBQ on indirect heat. The oven will provide more consistent heat. Every time you open the BBQ, you let out all the heat, and the heat will vary wildly depending on where the meat is placed, even with a top end BBQ. A good oven, on the other hand, is designed to provide consistent heat. Top end restaurants will all use ovens to cook thicker cuts of meat.

And no the infrared searing will not produce the same effect that butter will.
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#52 Jai604

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 04:42 PM

Absolutely NOTHING wrong with finishing your steaks in the oven. If you have a good BBQ of course it's not necessary, but there is nothing wrong with using an oven. NONE.

Just remember a few things when cooking steaks (as it seems everyone else has given you advice on temperatures):

Don't ever cut your steaks to make them thinner, that is absolutely HORRID advice. Steaks should be an inch thick at the minimum.

Make sure your steaks are at room temperature before cooking. This ensures that the inside of the steak will cook and you won't have a seared steak that is still cold on the inside.

Flip ONCE. Never flip your steak more than once. Ever.

Do not use a fork to flip your steaks. You puncture your steak and lose all the juices. Use tongs.

If you want to poke your steak to check for doneness, use your finger. The meaty part at the base of your thumb is what a rare steak feels like. The palm of your hand is medium-rare. Don't cook a steak beyond medium-rare, ever. You'll ruin it.

The general rule is, the higher the fat content, the lower the heat, and the more time. When I say lower, I don't mean a lot lower, but slightly lower. The reasoning is that you want the fat in your steak to be able to break down and infuse into your steak. Steaks with a higher fat content can also be cooked to a higher done-ness if desired. For example, if you cook a sirloin steak, which is very lean, you'd probably want to cook it on high-high heat and eat it rare. A rib-eye steak, however (which has considerably more fat) you could cook on medium-high (like a 7.5/10) and have it medium rare.

Don't mess around with your steak and put sauce and other stuff on it. Good quality coarse sea salt and fresh-cracked pepper, or if you really need more flavour something like Montreal steak spice. That's it.

I also like to use grapeseed oil, as it has a very neutral flavour and high burning point. Exta-virgin olive oil is not a good choice. Save that for dressings.

Always let your steak rest 10 minutes covered.


Oh, also if you're barbecuing on the ol' Q, to get those sexy grill lines, put your steaks on the grill at a 45 degree angle. Halfway through the time of your sear on one side, turn them 90 degrees (not flip) to get that nice cross-hatched pattern.

Edited by Jai604, 19 February 2013 - 04:43 PM.

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#53 ronthecivil

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 04:48 PM

you mean a dutch oven? it's great for braising a roast. I make a mean yankee pot roast in mine.


I dunno. I just saw them and my gf ended up getting them for my birthday. They are like a pot combined with a cast iron frying pan. Looks like the pictures above but different colour. You can put them in the oven no problem. I actually did a casserole in one ended up boiling the pasta and then adding all the meat and stuff and cooking it all in the same pan and then baking it in the oven.

So if that's what a dutch oven is than ya I have one (or is it two, or is only the bigger more oval one the dutch oven?)
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#54 ronthecivil

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 04:49 PM

it's cheaper to go gas, or keep your cheap oven plus bricks...

I didn't even know they had "high end" electric ovens... I always thought that's what gas ovens were for. :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot: :emot-parrot:


They make electric convection ovens. I saw one in the brick just the other day for 1k or so. And it was pretty nice.

Not everyone has the luxury of a gas hookup.
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#55 ronthecivil

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 04:57 PM

With an ultra thick cut of meat, the only way to cook it is in the oven or the BBQ on indirect heat. The oven will provide more consistent heat. Every time you open the BBQ, you let out all the heat, and the heat will vary wildly depending on where the meat is placed, even with a top end BBQ. A good oven, on the other hand, is designed to provide consistent heat. Top end restaurants will all use ovens to cook thicker cuts of meat.

And no the infrared searing will not produce the same effect that butter will.


If your using indirect heat you can still use a probe thermometer (just wire it through the non lit side, and don't even dream of doing this when searing) to keep and eye on the roast. And ya it doesn't heat exactly evenly which is why you open the lid ONCE to turn the meat 180 about 2/3rd of the time (more like temperature, like at 110/120) through cooking. If you set the probe right (so the oven reader is centred above the meat) you get a pretty good idea of the temperature and can fine tune the controls.

Don't get me wrong I like the idea of trying out my cast iron pot as a holder for it if only to act as a temperature regulator but the bonus of the BBQ is you can put wood chips in a can and really put a nice smokey flavour on the meat.
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#56 hudson bay rules

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:08 PM

Putting it in the oven is a great way to overcook it. Beware.
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#57 nux4lyfe

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:30 PM

I'm so glad I made this thread, I've learned so much!, Thank You guys..I almost ruined some very expensive steaks!
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#58 hudson bay rules

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:35 PM

I'm so glad I made this thread, I've learned so much!, Thank You guys..I almost ruined some very expensive steaks!


so, what did ya do?
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#59 J.R.

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:42 PM

I also like to use grapeseed oil, as it has a very neutral flavour and high burning point. Exta-virgin olive oil is not a good choice. Save that for dressings.


Interesting. Though other than searing I cook my steak off flame anyway so I don't think it would make much if any difference.
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#60 taxi

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 06:17 PM

If your using indirect heat you can still use a probe thermometer (just wire it through the non lit side, and don't even dream of doing this when searing) to keep and eye on the roast. And ya it doesn't heat exactly evenly which is why you open the lid ONCE to turn the meat 180 about 2/3rd of the time (more like temperature, like at 110/120) through cooking. If you set the probe right (so the oven reader is centred above the meat) you get a pretty good idea of the temperature and can fine tune the controls.

Don't get me wrong I like the idea of trying out my cast iron pot as a holder for it if only to act as a temperature regulator but the bonus of the BBQ is you can put wood chips in a can and really put a nice smokey flavour on the meat.


Not talking about roasts though. Using wood chips on a steak you want to cook through a little bit more would be a waste. In order to get the smokey flavor of the chips, you're going to need to have the meat in the smoke for a relatively long period of time.

I also prefer the BBQ for roasts. You have more options in terms of allowing dripings out, smoking, etc...

If you want to finish off your steak with indirect heat, I'd still say the oven is the way to go, as you have the most control over how evenly the heat is distrubted through the steak. But like others have said, be careful not to overcook. I'd only really recommend this for fatty cuts of meat. I like to eat the leaner ones pretty rare.
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