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TOMapleLaughs

Review: HAS our drafting/development Actually Improved Under Gillis?

75 posts in this topic

Too early to tell but mg hasn't drafted impressively what so ever

Go to hockey futures website and look at every other teams picks in the past 4-5 years. Canucks picks have extremely low success rates compared to other teams.

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How you can call any pick a bust after two years is incredible. Most of our core has been drafted by us or signed as an undrafted free agent. I don't see this changing anytime soon.

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MG is bad at drafting. AV is bad at all things.

Fire both.

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The Canucks don't have one impact/scoring forward on their roster who was brought in by Gillis via free agency,trade or draft.

AV is a scapegoat. He actually gets more out the talent the Canucks have then he should. The Canucks just aren't that talented.

Booth is a overpaid/overrrated floater and Gillis has a good knack of finding players off bad teams who have somewhat productive years there simply because they are the focal points on those bad teams(ie. they get all the power play time and top line minutes)

Gillis is a complete and utter failure as a GM. Mark my word if AV is fired the Canucks will get worse.

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I'm of the belief that the biggest obstacle in terms of prospect development remains to be the head coach of the Canucks.

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Bieksa

Kesler

Burrows

Hansen

Edler

Schneider

Tanev

Hodgson

Kassian

Schroeder

All players drafted and then 'developed' under AV

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Bieksa

Kesler

Burrows

Hansen

Edler

Schneider

Tanev

Hodgson

Kassian

Schroeder

All players drafted and then 'developed' under AV

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And Michel Therrien developed Crosby, Malkin, Letang, Fleury, Staal. We should get him!!!!

Just because he is the coach doesn't mean he developed all those players otherwise you could say the same about every team?..... Schroeders played like 10 games, not sure how AV has developed him... or Kassian

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And Michel Therrien developed Crosby, Malkin, Letang, Fleury, Staal. We should get him!!!!

Just because he is the coach doesn't mean he developed all those players otherwise you could say the same about every team?..... Schroeders played like 10 games, not sure how AV has developed him... or Kassian

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no they were not. tanev was undrafted and kass was traded for... just saying

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The Canucks don't have one impact/scoring on their roster who was brought in by Gillis via free agency,trade or draft.

AV is a scapegoat. He actually gets more out the talent the Canucks have then he should. The Canucks just aren't that talented.

Booth is a overpaid/overrrated floater and Gillis has a good knack of finding players off bad teams who have somewhat productive years there simply because they are the focal points on those bad teams(ie. they get all the power play time and top line minutes)

Gillis is a complete and utter failure as a GM. Mark my word if AV is fired the Canucks will get worse.

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The only sample we can really use from Gillis is the 08 and 09 drafts. Everything else is too early, and 2010 is largely a write off, because of our picks being dealt - this was also a notoriously weak draft, so I have no problem with dealing our first.

2011 and 2012 are too recent, as these guys aren't even out of junior yet.

That being said, I would have to correct you on some evaluations. The first being Andersson, who is currently on the Wolves top pairing, and has been a defense main stay down there all year. Being a Swede, and playing in the SEL gives him some upside as a puck mover. We'll see him as a call up as early as next year.

The 2011 class might be most indicative of Gillis's changes to the drafting/development department. Corrado and Jensen are steals for where they went, and Swedish defenseman Tommernes has been a key part of his SEL team's success, even while playing against partial NHL line ups.

From this past year, Gaunce has shown tremendous development this past month, demonstrating offense with 17 points in 12 games. Myron has taken the jump to pro and is currently PPG in the ECHL awaiting AHL call up. Hutton has gone from benched rookie to top pairing D on the powerhouse Maine team.

You seem to forget the epic fails by Nonis, which were blatant even at the time of the draft. I'm talking Patrick White, Daniel Rahimi, to a large degree taking Grabner 16th when he was rated in the 40s (which is where our 2nd was that year), and of course Juraj Simek, Evan Fuller and Dan Gendur.

Let's give Gillis some more time, as I think our most recent drafts might be his best.

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As already posted this says it all..

Not to mention how many late first round picks MG has had.

Question: How Many NHL Draft Picks Make it to the NHL?

Over 200 players are selected at every NHL draft. How many of them go on to have NHL careers? What are the prospects for a player selected in the first round of the NHL Draft compared to later rounds?

Answer: To properly evaluate a draft, you need a few year's distance from it. So let's look at the 1990s.

To define whether a player "makes it," let's set the threshold at 200 NHL games. We'll call them "career players."

Between 1990 and 1999, there were 2,600 names called at the NHL Entry Draft.

As of 2007, 494 of those players have appeared in at least 200 NHL games. That's a success rate of 19 percent.

But of course, not all draft picks are created equal. The guys picked in the first round are a cut above the rest:

Success rate of first-round draft picks

  • Of the 494 career players drafted in the 1990s, 160 were selected in the first round.

  • Of those 160 career players, over half have played more than 500 NHL games.

  • Among the older players (those drafted from 1990 to 1994), six first-round picks have made it to 1,000 games. Another couple of dozen are still active and within reach of 1,000.

  • Based on the 1990s sample, a first-round draft pick has a 63 percent chance of being a career player.

    Results can vary widely from year to year:

  • The 1993 NHL Draft produced 22 career players from 26 first-round picks.

  • In 1999, less than half of the first-round selections went on to become career players (12 out of 28).

Beyond the first round.

This is where the NHL dream begins to fade in a hurry:

  • From 1990 to 1999, about one-quarter of the players selected in the second round turned into NHL career players.

    Those drafted in the third round and beyond are really up against it.

  • From over 2,000 players selected in the third round and beyond during 1990s, just 261 made it as NHL career players. That's about 12 percent.

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