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Use Your Handheld Cellphone While Driving in BC - Cell and Vehicle Seized

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And you're why I miss the neg button.

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Well Gäz you can't fix stupid. I understand your concerns as it can be frightening on the roads especially if you are a pedestrian.

That said I don't text. I only talk on the phone. In 15 years of driving I have not been in an accident.

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Don't be butthurt, old man. Times have changed.

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I am all for the texting/email while driving, but I don't agree with banning the holding of the phone to your ear.

What drives me nuts now, are the idiots that think because the phone is on speaker, they can still hold it in their hands in front of their face. That is NOT hands free! It likely causes more of a distraction when you can't hear so are constantly moving it around and looking down at it.

On a driving related note, there are digital speed signs in a few spots in north van that flash really bright strobe lights when you go above the speed limit. Now that's a great idea, roadside distractions FTW!!!!. May as well be on the phone looking in front of you.

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Well Gäz you can't fix stupid. I understand your concerns as it can be frightening on the roads especially if you are a pedestrian.

That said I don't text. I only talk on the phone. In 15 years of driving I have not been in an accident.

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Cellphone/electronic devices law for B.C. drivers:

  • As of January 1, 2010 the use of cellphones or any handheld portable electronic devices by drivers is restricted in B.C. The fine is $167 and 3 penalty points. While operating a motor vehicle drivers:

  • Can not make or receive calls, send or read text messages or e-mails

  • Can not hold or operate any electronic device (i.e. cellphone, MP3 player, GPS Navigation System)

  • Can use hands-free cell phones and devices if they can be used by voice activation or pressing a single button once only

  • In the Graduated Licensing Program can not operate hand-held or hands-free cellphones or other electronic devices

http://www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/osmv/road-safety/distracted.htm

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I am all for the texting/email while driving, but I don't agree with banning the holding of the phone to your ear.

What drives me nuts now, are the idiots that think because the phone is on speaker, they can still hold it in their hands in front of their face. That is NOT hands free! It likely causes more of a distraction when you can't hear so are constantly moving it around and looking down at it.

On a driving related note, there are digital speed signs in a few spots in north van that flash really bright strobe lights when you go above the speed limit. Now that's a great idea, roadside distractions FTW!!!!. May as well be on the phone looking in front of you.

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One of the latest ICBC strategies is to demand your cellphone logs when you make a claim or are involved in an accident. If you are shown to be using your cellphone at the time of the accident, ICBC denies coverage or imputes fault.

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Good. Less distracted "cagers" on the road for me to worry about while out riding my motorcycle. doorag.gif

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They put the speaker on because if it were up to their ear they would get caught by the police, not because they think it's "hands free".

People are not THAT stupid.

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People justifying distracted driving...

BArFt.gif

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Another big distraction when driving? Nagging spouses. A divorce fixes that but it can be expensive.

Note- more sarcasm

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One of the latest ICBC strategies is to demand your cellphone logs when you make a claim or are involved in an accident. If you are shown to be using your cellphone at the time of the accident, ICBC denies coverage or imputes fault.

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BTW police in BC are exempt from these distracted driving laws relating to cellphones and portable electronic devices.

Should they be?

The death of an 18-year-old pedestrian who was struck by a B.C. RCMP cruiser has led one local police force to reconsider its policy on using technology behind the wheel.

Ashley Guiboche was killed while jaywalking across King George Boulevard in Surrey on Jan. 31, 2011. A coroner’s inquest heard the officer who struck her was responding to a stolen car call, and had looked at his in-cruiser computer.

“It is my belief that if he had been watching the road he might well have avoided hitting her, but he didn’t. It appears he never saw her,” said BC Coroners Service lawyer Rod MacKenzie.

The inquest concluded last month with a list of six recommendations, including the introduction of hands-free technology for cop car computers. It suggests the devices should be capable of transmitting audio readings of all incoming messages, and receiving verbal responses from officers who are driving.

Police in B.C. are exempt from distracted driving laws, including bans on cell phone use. But in light of Guiboche’s tragic death, the Abbotsford Police Department has voluntarily implemented a new policy to limit the use of technology regardless.

Police in the city are still permitted to use hand-operated radios, but are now limited to the use of hands-free phone devices. They also can no longer send messages on their computers while driving.

“Our expectation is that [police] are only hitting key strokes when you’re parked or if you’re in a two-person car, where one person focuses on [the computer] and the other person can focus on the task of driving,” said Const. Ian MacDonald.

The Vancouver Police Department told CTV News its policy allows for electronic devices, but only if it is a priority and there are no reasonable alternatives.

The RCMP says it is still studying the coroner’s inquest recommendations made in connection with Guiboche’s death.

http://bc.ctvnews.ca/are-cop-car-computers-distracting-police-from-the-road-1.1181723#ixzz2Mz8r6zDz

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And note this if you have a graduated license (GLP: 'L's and 'N's) you cannot use any electronic device even if approved for other drivers.

Violation tickets can be issued for any electronic distraction, including hands-free devices and always comes with 3 penalty points. As well, the driving record of any GLP driver with 3 points or more will automatically undergo a review by the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles – see the Driver Improvement Program page on this site. If the Superintendent issues a driving prohibition to a driver in the Novice stage, the 24-month Novice driving period starts over when the prohibition ends and the novice driver gets re-licensed.

http://www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/osmv/road-safety/distracted.htm

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I'm all for the no texting and driving laws (and just the general use of your phone while driving) but seizing the phone AND car seems unnecessary to me. $167 fine is enough.

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Comparing eating and texting when driving as the same? Are your eyes constantly fixed on your food and digging through it with your fingers? Shouldn't eat when driving that's disgusting. I'm sure you don't clean the vehicle properly it's probably full of rotting food. Driving and texting is stupid. I hope this law is passed.

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