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danielsedin_22

First car

48 posts in this topic

'90's Honda Civics and 2000's Pontiac Sunfires are 2 models that are reliable and there are plenty of parts available.

Late 60's and 70's "Muscle Cars" are a choice, too, if you can get one in decent mechanical shape. If you like working on cars, these types of vehicle are perfect to learn on, too. My first car was a '76 Austin Mini I bought off my brother. Learned a lot from that car.

Just one guys opinion.

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Test drive a few dozen cars you're interested in and pick the one you like best. Vehicles are very personal things, so you'll get a different answer from almost everyone.

Don't forget to get a full inspection done on any used car before you purchase it. Don't want to get a lemon.

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I got an 2002 Honda Civic for just over 5G's. Only had 40k km's too!

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Why is this in the gaming forum

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Check out Phil Edmonston's Lemon-Aid Used car guides. They are focused on Canadian models and tell you what to look out for on different models as well as providing overall ratings and a price range.

http://www.lemonaidcars.com/

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Give us some criteria first. Do you want a truck/car/coupe etc. Also what characteristics do you want? Are you after performance or fuel economy? Size? etc.

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I posted this in an earlier thread:

Check out Lemon Aid Used Cars and Trucks Guide by Phil Edmonston for assessments, recommendations, known defects and weaknesses and recalls for the particular makes and models by year. Use the latest edition that has the year of vehicle you are considering. It will also give you a price range depending upon the condition of the vehicle.

These are Canadian guides and most libraries should have them in the reference section.

Be careful that you are not dealings with "curbers" or buying a rebuild.

Make sure that you get a vehicle inspection done - BCAA has an inspection facility across from BCIT as well as a mobile services and I have used them in the past:

http://www.bcaa.com/...hs.xsl/1761.htm

Here are BCAA Tips on Buying a Used Car:

http://www.bcaa.com/...hs.xsl/1769.htm

http://www.bcaa.com/...qysxUBmXZ5CA!!/

Liens can be checked at the Personal Property Registry, through BC Online, or at select Service BC office locations. There is a small fee.

Or a more comprehensive check through a service such as Carproof:

https://www.carproof...VerifiedBC.aspx

Here are some tips from the Motor Vehicle Sales Authority of British Columbia. There are also videos.

http://www.mdcbc.com/buying-tips.htm

Private sales

Private sales account for over 20% of used vehicle transactions in BC. A private seller may offer a vehicle at a lower price than a dealer and may be able to give you first-hand proof of its accident and repair history if he is selling you his own car.

If you buy from a private owner, you almost always buy "as is". You negotiate price on the basis of your evaluation of the vehicle and what you think will be needed to correct any defects. Your remedies are very limited if things go wrong.

Be careful to avoid being taken advantage of by dishonest sellers or unlicensed dealers. It will be difficult to get compensation from a private seller if there are problems with the vehicle. If the vehicle you buy was stolen, you won't be able to register it and could lose both the vehicle and your money.

If you decide to buy from a private individual:

* Ask for the original registration form and examine it closely. Do not accept a photocopy. Check to see that the vehicle is registered in the name of the seller. Verify the owner's address with the registration form and the location of sale.

* Check to see that the vehicle identification number (VIN) on the registration form is the same number that is stamped on the identification plate on the vehicle dash.

* If the seller claims to have owned the vehicle since it was new, or for any length of time, ask to see the repair bills and maintenance records.

* Ask if the vehicle has even been in an accident. If so, ask what the damage was, who fixed it and what it cost to fix. Find out if the auto body shop that repaired the vehicle was approved to do ICBC repairs.

* Check for liens against the vehicle.

* If the seller makes certain claims about the vehicle, such as saying it has a new transmission or rebuilt motor, get it in writing; and

* Get a vehicle inspection and obtain a vehicle history report to avoid problem vehicles.

If you buy from a private seller, the seller will give you the Owner's Certificate of Registration and a signed Transfer/Tax form (or APV9T). It is best to go to an Autoplan agent with the seller. The agent will use these signed forms to process the transfer of ownership. Make sure the seller has completely filled in their part of the form.

...

Checking for liens

Motor dealers are required to sell vehicles free of liens but you must check for liens against the vehicle when buying from a private individual. Some used vehicle buyers have been surprised to find a tow truck in their driveway towing away their recent purchase. This could happen if a garage had a lien against the vehicle for unpaid repairs or its former owner had an unpaid loan on the vehicle.

* You'll need the vehicle's 17-digit VIN. Liens can be checked at the Personal Property Registry, through BC Online, or at select Service BC office locations. There is a small fee. Select banks, credit unions and finance companies also provide this service for a slightly higher fee.

* The Vehicle Sales Authority suggests obtaining a comprehensive vehicle report, like CarProof; which offers vehicle history reports that include a lien search. It’s cheap peace of mind!

* If there is a record that you searched for liens in BC and none was registered when you took ownership, a lien holder will not be able to take your vehicle away.

* There is a slight possibility a lien could be registered between the time you do a search and when your deal is finalized.

* To guard against this, make your purchase subject to a condition that the vehicle is free from liens at the specified time of sale.

* Beware that if there is a lien on the vehicle registered in another province, it could be seized. Contact the Personal Property Registry for lien search information in other provinces.
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5-8 G's is a lot for a first car. Sigh I remember my first car... I totalled it a month later. But man a lot of memories in one month.

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I'd buy a early 2000s civic or like minded import etc... Good reliable cars, good on gas

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Find a diesel Land Cruiser with low km's on it. With proper maintenance that thing will last you forever and should be pretty good $/fuel. You can take it off-roading/camping/etc too.

edit - or a Unimog haha

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You can buy my first car. :lol:

97 Mazda MX-6, 166,000km's (Same colour, different rims)

mx6resize1.jpg

Not selling till June-August. Can't wait for the Golf I'm buying <3

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You can buy my first car. :lol:

97 Mazda MX-6, 166,000km's (Same colour, different rims)

mx6resize1.jpg

Not selling till June-August. Can't wait for the Golf I'm buying <3

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Honda Prelude 98-2001.

... Assuming you can find a good one. Most are garbage.

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