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The Arrogant Worms

Becoming a lawyer.....Wetcoaster?

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Well my son is off to UVIC in Sept...his goal is to become a lawyer. He plans to major in political science but from what I have read that leads to no jobs if you do not get into law school.

I just read that UVIC has changed to 50/50 LSAT and GPA for law school admission in 2017

"

1. GPA/LSAT will no longer be weighted 70/30, but rather 50/50. This change attempts to minimize the effects that variability between programs in strength and grade inflation will have on the admissions process. It seems that the Committee is concerned with admitting certain high-GPA, low-LSAT splitters where the GPA is not a reliable indicator due to the applicant's institution or program. "

Any wanna be lawyers here and what advice do you have?

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I would have liked to become an attorney. Its too bad I didnt apply myself in college. I had fun though. I hear its very competitive..

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It's a super competitive field.

Somebody I know applied prior to UBC last year (it was their first choice), and despite having a cumulative GPA of 3.8 and scoring in the 98% percentile of the LSAT (UBC weighs 50/50) they did not get accepted. Granted, there was many other schools that they were accepted into, but they had their hopes set on getting into UBC and not getting in put a pretty big hitch in their plans.

I'm currently majoring in Criminology at SFU, and intend on going to UBC Faculty of Law after I complete my undergrad. Haven't done that well so far (just above a 3.0 GPA), and I know that I am really going to have to buckle down starting my 3rd year next fall.

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Tell him to study something he enjoys for his undergrad so that he can get a high GPA...and tell him not to goof off first year...although most schools calculate your GPA based on the last two years of your undergrad, UVIC and UBC are one of the few schools that consider your entire 4 years (with around 12-18 of your worst credits dropped). Also, I suggest studying for the LSAT in the summer and taking the October or December administration (maybe take a prep course if he's not disciplined to study on his own)...but he doesn't have to worry about that until his 3rd or 4th year! I'm an applicant this year so if you have any other questions let me know!

EDIT: Also, a lot of schools are switching towards having a holistic application process, meaning that extracurricular are very VERY important. Tell him to get involved, volunteer, play sports etc...it'll definitely give his application a boost, especially if he is fighting for a spot with someone else.

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being a lawyer it´s something like between "sell your soul" or "being an actor" for many reasons:

1) the "true" isn´t "true" unless you are payed. them your client has the right to be true and if he pays more he is totally true...

2) being arrogant with the court judges is a was to show how much you payed to get your degree...

3) for a lawyer the court judge is a ass#$%¨¨% making his/her job slow and for the court judge the lawyer is a dummy making his/her job harder...

4) you never know when a lawyer is telling the true because once the lawyer has a customer his/her point of view is changed. who pays more has the reason...

5) the only diference between an actor and a lawyer is that you know that the actor is lying for a good reason. a lawyer can lie for any reason, at any time and nobody knows is the reason is good or not...

6) international lawyers are even worse because they can be boring and arrogant in more than one language...

source. my sister....

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I wrapped up my degree in International Studies last August at Simon Fraser University and had originally intended on going to law school at the outset of going to university. I slowly realized throughout getting my degree that going to law school and becoming a lawyer was not for me. I know that I don't want to have $150,000 in debt and be a slave to that for a couple of decades, or work six days a week, 10 hours a day, working a mind-numbing boring job being a paper monkey for people all because I would make "good money". Have your son read this article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tucker-max/law-school_b_2713943.html, hopefully it will open his eyes to the reality of what he thinks he wants to do.

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well, my advice is of limited value because i go to law school in the US. i was an undergrad also in the US at a small liberal arts college, and majored in history. it's tough to get a job with a history major, but it's what i wanted to do so i did it. i did not want to waste my college years doing something i hated. i invested in an online LSAT class, and it helped me tremendously (literally increased my lsat by about 15).

my personal experience has been that all the recent reports and articles about law school over-dramatize the job situation. it's not pretty, but it's not as desperate as i have been reading. i don't know what it's like in canada though.

extracurricular are really important. a lot of people come in with the same stats, and that can easily be the difference maker. i would start working on a personal statement ASAP, it has to be really good.

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Be prepared to be the most dull person in the world.

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Well my son is off to UVIC in Sept...his goal is to become a lawyer. He plans to major in political science but from what I have read that leads to no jobs if you do not get into law school.

I just read that UVIC has changed to 50/50 LSAT and GPA for law school admission in 2017

"

1. GPA/LSAT will no longer be weighted 70/30, but rather 50/50. This change attempts to minimize the effects that variability between programs in strength and grade inflation will have on the admissions process. It seems that the Committee is concerned with admitting certain high-GPA, low-LSAT splitters where the GPA is not a reliable indicator due to the applicant's institution or program. "

Any wanna be lawyers here and what advice do you have?

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being a lawyer it´s something like between "sell your soul" or "being an actor" for many reasons:

1) the "true" isn´t "true" unless you are payed. them your client has the right to be true and if he pays more he is totally true...

2) being arrogant with the court judges is a was to show how much you payed to get your degree...

3) for a lawyer the court judge is a ass#$%¨¨% making his/her job slow and for the court judge the lawyer is a dummy making his/her job harder...

4) you never know when a lawyer is telling the true because once the lawyer has a customer his/her point of view is changed. who pays more has the reason...

5) the only diference between an actor and a lawyer is that you know that the actor is lying for a good reason. a lawyer can lie for any reason, at any time and nobody knows is the reason is good or not...

6) international lawyers are even worse because they can be boring and arrogant in more than one language...

source. my sister....

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What about going into Law with a business background (undergrad)? How common is that?

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If he chooses a simpler undergrad path he has 4 years to prep for the LSAT. It's his best shot. He should learn very quickly if law isn't for him, hopefully before his 4th year.

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What about going into Law with a business background (undergrad)? How common is that?

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If he chooses a simpler undergrad path he has 4 years to prep for the LSAT. It's his best shot. He should learn very quickly if law isn't for him, hopefully before his 4th year.

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Invariably the drop outs in my first year law class were students who had taken less rigorous degrees. Take a degree that challenges you to think and teaches you research and writing skills if you are going for a BA.

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What could be less rigorous than Political Science or History?

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You obviously know very little about those two areas of study. Lots of research and lots of research papers at UVic.

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