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The Workout Thread

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I'm taking around 70grams of protein in my shake right after a workout, does anyone know if your body can take anymore right after? I'm assuming you can, but I don't want to waste it if it's not going to work.

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I'm taking around 70grams of protein in my shake right after a workout, does anyone know if your body can take anymore right after? I'm assuming you can, but I don't want to waste it if it's not going to work.

Peri-workout nutrition, and the 'benefits' one can recieve from 'optimizing' it, are marginal at best, but if it makes you feel better and helps with compliance keep doing it. If anything, I'd cut the protein in the shake in half and then add 2x the protein amount in carbs, so the post workout shake would be ~40g protein 80g carbs.

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Peri-workout nutrition, and the 'benefits' one can recieve from 'optimizing' it, are marginal at best, but if it makes you feel better and helps with compliance keep doing it. If anything, I'd cut the protein in the shake in half and then add 2x the protein amount in carbs, so the post workout shake would be ~40g protein 80g carbs.

I'm cutting at the moment to get back down to around 11% body fat so I'm trying to go less on carbs even though I'm working out:

I still get quite a bit of carb intake throughout the day.

But I'll try less with the protein for a while and see how that effects my body!

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Thanks guys! These are the types of questions that im afraid to ask at the gym in fear that Ill look like a giant loser.

Itd probably be like someone asking us who the better shooter is. Daniel or Henrik lol

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Thanks guys! These are the types of questions that im afraid to ask at the gym in fear that Ill look like a giant loser.

Itd probably be like someone asking us who the better shooter is. Daniel or Henrik lol

Lol that's probably the best way to describe it ahahah

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I'm cutting at the moment to get back down to around 11% body fat so I'm trying to go less on carbs even though I'm working out:

I still get quite a bit of carb intake throughout the day.

But I'll try less with the protein for a while and see how that effects my body!

Makes sense. In hindsight, I realized my proposed shake had an extra 160 calories (oops).

Can you redistribute your protein and carb intake to still hit your goal numbers if you have a shake that is 30p/60c?

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Makes sense. In hindsight, I realized my proposed shake had an extra 160 calories (oops).

Can you redistribute your protein and carb intake to still hit your goal numbers if you have a shake that is 30p/60c?

Ya I could easily do that. 1 scoop of my protein=30grams!

I'd really only half to add a banana and some extra fruit to get those carbs in.

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Ya I could easily do that. 1 scoop of my protein=30grams!

I'd really only half to add a banana and some extra fruit to get those carbs in.

My body is like this

To decrease

50% protein, 25% fat, 25% carbs under BMR

Maintain - Same thing @ BMR

To get fat 50% or more carbs aka drinking beer

I don't know what it is but my body hates carbs, if I eat too much I can't stop farting and feel like crap.

My metabolism seems to get pissed off too.

People suggest I'm a no Gluten guy but I have a phobia of doctors so Ill never know.

Cave men ate a low carb diet, maybe I'm just a slow evolver

Probably the easiest way to track food is an awesome little app called lose it

Edited by Noheart

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Wish I had the motivation to make several meals throughout the day.

i make my weeks meals all on sunday, i find it easier

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got another newb question for you gym rats. obviously you dont go to the gym every day right? so how often should I be going.

I play ball hockey on Mondays in the summer (2 24 min games). would that count as a gym day?

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got another newb question for you gym rats. obviously you dont go to the gym every day right? so how often should I be going.

I play ball hockey on Mondays in the summer (2 24 min games). would that count as a gym day?

I only go 3-4 days a week, but that is because of what I train for and the need for systemic recovery between workouts, and because its easy to go 3 days a week when you have 3 lifts that are the core and focus of your training.

As for you asking how often to go, what routine have you decided to go with? If you decide to go with what I linked, 3 days with a day off between each workout would be ideal.

As for ball hockey, I wouldn't classify it as a 'gym day' because you aren't really training anything, it is just general conditioning.

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I only go 3-4 days a week, but that is because of what I train for and the need for systemic recovery between workouts, and because its easy to go 3 days a week when you have 3 lifts that are the core and focus of your training.

As for you asking how often to go, what routine have you decided to go with? If you decide to go with what I linked, 3 days with a day off between each workout would be ideal.

As for ball hockey, I wouldn't classify it as a 'gym day' because you aren't really training anything, it is just general conditioning.

I haven't decided what routine to go with at the moment. at my gym there is this fit fix program which is a lineup of 9 machines that work different areas. so what ive been doing until I know what im doing is hit the treadmill at a pretty good pace for 15 mins then do 3 sets of 8- 12 (by the end of the last set im pretty much destroyed and have a difficult time getting 8) on each of the 9 machines. then cool down on the elliptical for a couple mins.

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I haven't decided what routine to go with at the moment.  at my gym there is this fit fix program which is a lineup of 9 machines that work different areas. so what ive been doing until I know what im doing is hit the treadmill at a pretty good pace for 15 mins then do 3 sets of 8- 12 (by the end of the last set im pretty much destroyed and have a difficult time getting 8) on each of the 9 machines. then cool down on the elliptical for a couple mins.

You can do much better than the fit fix program. Machines can have SOME value (leg press and hack squat are pretty good) in a program, however, they should not be the BASIS of the program. Also, I'd do the cardo after you lift or not at all since you play ball hockey.

The key to measureable progress in the gym is being able to make constant progression through increased loading of the movement. Machines do not offer this ability because at some point you will stall out and be incapable of adding weight for long periods at a time. In addition, machines are best used for "filling in the gaps" IMO and therfore for them to be useful you must first build a muscular base from which you develop "gaps" because some smaller muscles get left out.

You don't have to do a full body rountine, but I do suggest that your workouts have 1 compound movement that can be progressively overloaded and then 2-4 other exercises that target that half of the body. The "other" exercises are used to fill the gaps that the big movement doesn't hit. When you structure you traiing this way, you can either do it in a push/pull/legs manner, or an upper/lower manner.

Example push/pull/legs:

Push:

Bench 3x5 (add 5lbs per session until you can't anymore, then add 5lbs/week)

DB Bench 5x10

Flyes 5x10

Skull Crushers 5x10

Pull:

Deadlifts 1x5 (ramp up to a top set of 5, add 10lbs per session)

V-handle cable row 4x12

Face pulls 5x20

Curls 5x10

Legs:

Squat 3x5 (add 10lbs a session, 5lbs when you can no longer at 10, then 5lbs/ week after that)

Leg press or Hack Squat 4x10

Single leg extensions 4x12

Leg Curl 4x12

Sample upper/lower split:

Lower:

Squat 3x5 (add 10lbs a session, 5lbs when you can no longer at 10, then 5lbs/ week after that)

Leg press or Hack Squat 4x10

Single leg extensions 4x12

Leg Curl 4x12

Upper:

Push:

Bench 3x5 (add 5lbs per session until you can't anymore, then add 5lbs/week)

DB Bench 5x10

V-Hanle Rows 4x12

Skull Crushers 5x10

Curls 5x10

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You can do much better than the fit fix program. Machines can have SOME value (leg press and hack squat are pretty good) in a program, however, they should not be the BASIS of the program. Also, I'd do the cardo after you lift or not at all since you play ball hockey.

The key to measureable progress in the gym is being able to make constant progression through increased loading of the movement. Machines do not offer this ability because at some point you will stall out and be incapable of adding weight for long periods at a time. In addition, machines are best used for "filling in the gaps" IMO and therfore for them to be useful you must first build a muscular base from which you develop "gaps" because some smaller muscles get left out.

You don't have to do a full body rountine, but I do suggest that your workouts have 1 compound movement that can be progressively overloaded and then 2-4 other exercises that target that half of the body. The "other" exercises are used to fill the gaps that the big movement doesn't hit. When you structure you traiing this way, you can either do it in a push/pull/legs manner, or an upper/lower manner.

Example push/pull/legs:

Push:

Bench 3x5 (add 5lbs per session until you can't anymore, then add 5lbs/week)

DB Bench 5x10

Flyes 5x10

Skull Crushers 5x10

Pull:

Deadlifts 1x5 (ramp up to a top set of 5, add 10lbs per session)

V-handle cable row 4x12

Face pulls 5x20

Curls 5x10

Legs:

Squat 3x5 (add 10lbs a session, 5lbs when you can no longer at 10, then 5lbs/ week after that)

Leg press or Hack Squat 4x10

Single leg extensions 4x12

Leg Curl 4x12

Sample upper/lower split:

Lower:

Squat 3x5 (add 10lbs a session, 5lbs when you can no longer at 10, then 5lbs/ week after that)

Leg press or Hack Squat 4x10

Single leg extensions 4x12

Leg Curl 4x12

Upper:

Push:

Bench 3x5 (add 5lbs per session until you can't anymore, then add 5lbs/week)

DB Bench 5x10

V-Hanle Rows 4x12

Skull Crushers 5x10

Curls 5x10

away from the machines I go lol! I like how you knew I was talking about the fit fix. Edited by Gooseberries

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away from the machines I go lol! I like how you knew I was talking about the fit fix.

Good. It isn't called the fit fix here in the States, but they have something similar and just as dumb marketed to new gym clientele at the big commercial gyms here. The machine circuit is nothing more than a money making scheme by the machine makers to get stupid gym owners to by 35 different machines that take up 75% of the gym floor space.

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You can do much better than the fit fix program. Machines can have SOME value (leg press and hack squat are pretty good) in a program, however, they should not be the BASIS of the program. Also, I'd do the cardo after you lift or not at all since you play ball hockey.

The key to measureable progress in the gym is being able to make constant progression through increased loading of the movement. Machines do not offer this ability because at some point you will stall out and be incapable of adding weight for long periods at a time. In addition, machines are best used for "filling in the gaps" IMO and therfore for them to be useful you must first build a muscular base from which you develop "gaps" because some smaller muscles get left out.

You don't have to do a full body rountine, but I do suggest that your workouts have 1 compound movement that can be progressively overloaded and then 2-4 other exercises that target that half of the body. The "other" exercises are used to fill the gaps that the big movement doesn't hit. When you structure you traiing this way, you can either do it in a push/pull/legs manner, or an upper/lower manner.

Example push/pull/legs:

Push:

Bench 3x5 (add 5lbs per session until you can't anymore, then add 5lbs/week)

DB Bench 5x10

Flyes 5x10

Skull Crushers 5x10

Pull:

Deadlifts 1x5 (ramp up to a top set of 5, add 10lbs per session)

V-handle cable row 4x12

Face pulls 5x20

Curls 5x10

Legs:

Squat 3x5 (add 10lbs a session, 5lbs when you can no longer at 10, then 5lbs/ week after that)

Leg press or Hack Squat 4x10

Single leg extensions 4x12

Leg Curl 4x12

Sample upper/lower split:

Lower:

Squat 3x5 (add 10lbs a session, 5lbs when you can no longer at 10, then 5lbs/ week after that)

Leg press or Hack Squat 4x10

Single leg extensions 4x12

Leg Curl 4x12

Upper:

Push:

Bench 3x5 (add 5lbs per session until you can't anymore, then add 5lbs/week)

DB Bench 5x10

V-Hanle Rows 4x12

Skull Crushers 5x10

Curls 5x10

^^^^ Depends on what you are going for.

5 reps, which is what you've recommended for the compound workouts, is pretty low. At those low reps, you're going to be training for stength only. If you want to build endurance or size, you're going to need higher reps. In the 10-12 range, at least. If your training for sports or looks, I'd suggest higher reps.

Also, do not just automatically add on weight every week. Add on weight when you are actually ready for it. Do not sacrifice form for weight.

This routine is also going to be tough to follow. If you're hiting legs heavy with squats everyday, you're going to have a tough time. Doing heavy squats and/or deadlifts everyday is going to ravage your legs. Also Deadlift is not a "pull" exercise. It's an exercise that works primarily the legs. You should be pushing with your legs, as oppossed to pulling with your back. I'd drop the whole push/pull thing all together. And instead just work on hitting the different muscle groups as quickly as possible.

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5 reps, which is what you've recommended for the compound workouts, is pretty low. At those low reps, you're going to be training for stength only. If you want to build endurance or size, you're going to need higher reps. In the 10-12 range, at least. If your training for sports or looks, I'd suggest higher reps.

I suggested 5 reps for a reason. The reason being that getting bigger requires getting stronger. In addition, 5 reps builds a bit strength while also providing sufficient stimulus to force growth. It is most useful to build a strength base first and then transition to higher reps if looks are the goal. Also, all other things being equal the stronger athlete is the better athlete regardless of who is bigger.

If you actually read what I wrote, you'll see that I suggested 5 reps for the compound movements and higher reps of 10- 12 for the isolation work. The isolation work is to give the muscles hit by the compound movement more volume and to help promote growth

Also, do not just automatically add on weight every week. Add on weight when you are actually ready for it. Do not sacrifice form for weight.

Yes form is important, but perfect is the enemy of good in this situation. Adding weight at constant intervals is the basis of progressive overload, something that is essential for progress. Getting bigger and stronger is like getting a sun tan, you must continually provide more stimulus in order to force the body to adapt. As a newb, one can adapt to the stimulus from one workout in 24-48 hours and in order to force further adaptation, more weight must be added with each session.

This routine is also going to be tough to follow. If you're hiting legs heavy with squats everyday, you're going to have a tough time. Doing heavy squats and/or deadlifts everyday is going to ravage your legs. Also Deadlift is not a "pull" exercise. It's an exercise that works primarily the legs. You should be pushing with your legs, as oppossed to pulling with your back. I'd drop the whole push/pull thing all together. And instead just work on hitting the different muscle groups as quickly as possible.

How is it going to be hard to follow? You don't squat every day, you squat every legs or lower day which is 1-2x a week, completely doable. Furthermore, you won't be deadlifting every day either since you only do it on pull day which means its again 1-2x a week...something entirely doable for a newb.

Next, yes the deadlift does work the legs, however, it is NOT a leg dominant exercise. When properly performed, a deadlift mainly targets the muscles of the back as well, namely the spinal erectors which must maintain the spinal extension throughout the pull.

Finally, hitting all the muscle groups as quickly as possible is horribly inefficient for someone who has little training experience. Furthermore, how does one hit all the muscle groups as quickly as possible without doing 17 different exercises which, IMO, is a grand waste of time unless you are going to compete in bodybuilding.

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What do you guys do with your whey protein?

I've just been mixing it in milk.

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What do you guys do with your whey protein?

I've just been mixing it in milk.

Depends, are you bulking or cutting?

If I'm cutting I only add water. Anything else for my body is unnecessary calories.

If I'm bulking then ill add add banana, milk, peanut butter, kale, and some strawberries.

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