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The Workout Thread

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^^ I eat almonds on the regular. I have cheese every other day usually. No 30 minute runs. Sprinting yes. I usually have carbs all day, but in limited quantity. Lost 15 pounds in the last 6 weeks.

Just lift weights faster. Short rest times. Intense workouts that's all.

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Hey guys.

I want to incorporate cardio in the morning, probably 5k run and weights in the evening.

Are there any negatives with doing a lot of cardio at a different time of the day and then weights later on?

Does a lot of cardio cancel out muscle gain?

Depends what you do during the day as well.

Cardio is always good. All I do is run and swim now and eat well. I'm thirty nine. On and off up to a few years ago I hit the gym....as another poster just said and I agree with; do opposing muscle groups in your workout so you barely rest between sets. Then you're pretty much in an anaerobic state. By opposing I mean shoulders and biceps for example. Muscle groups that don't effect the performance of each other directly...go hard.

The two hour workout is done by most people who sit on their phone or chat way too long between sets... You should easily be finished, pumped, and sweating in forty minutes. Otherwise what's the point?

Then eat well, in small amounts, and often....get the metabolism working.

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thank you!! and no I haven't had experience with weight training

I would strongly consider hiring a personal trainer or going to the gym with a friend who knows what they're doing. While it's important to know what to do at the gym, it's loads more important to know NOT what to do.

Every time I hit the gym I see people doing the dumbest things, and it's quite laughable how people are so willing to sacrifice technique to say they lift x amount of weight. Not only do they cheat themselves, they absolutely destroy their body.

It's important to progress properly and learn basic lifting techniques first before progressing into any sort of training regime. I would start there... Even before worrying about the whole nutrition side of things.

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Depends what you do during the day as well.

Cardio is always good. All I do is run and swim now and eat well. I'm thirty nine. On and off up to a few years ago I hit the gym....as another poster just said and I agree with; do opposing muscle groups in your workout so you barely rest between sets. Then you're pretty much in an anaerobic state. By opposing I mean shoulders and biceps for example. Muscle groups that don't effect the performance of each other directly...go hard.

The two hour workout is done by most people who sit on their phone or chat way too long between sets... You should easily be finished, pumped, and sweating in forty minutes. Otherwise what's the point?

Then eat well, in small amounts, and often....get the metabolism working.

It really depends on what sort of training you're after and what type of splits you're doing. I see no issue with a two-hour workout given they're taking two hours for the right reasons.

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A mass muscle gain isn't so much of my goal as becoming lean. I guess I am more worried about losing muscle from cardio.

I'm going to try the early morning runs. Maybe not 5k in the end but at least 30 minutes. We'll see if I can do 5 days. If not I'll do 3 days for sure.

The only way you'll lose muscle mass from cardio is if you starve yourself. If you follow your body's cues (i.e. hunger), you should never lose weight.

I would rather you tackled it starting at 3 days then progress up to 5 if you can handle it. Much like weight lifting, it's better to start off light than too heavy. The last thing you want is to be overly fatigued and put in sub-par workouts.

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It really depends on what sort of training you're after and what type of splits you're doing. I see no issue with a two-hour workout given they're taking two hours for the right reasons.

I agree with you....when I was younger I eventually was doing two hour workouts....but my point lies in my observation that the majority of people are not maxing their two hours...

And for a toning/cardio workout I found and intense 45 minute workout to the point where you're actually breathing hard and sweating worked well....it's totally different than a drawn out heavy lifting session.

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The only way you'll lose muscle mass from cardio is if you starve yourself. If you follow your body's cues (i.e. hunger), you should never lose weight.

This is simply not true. Extended cardio will cause you to lose muscle mass and will inhibit your body from putting on muscle. I'm not saying a 30 minute jog is going to destroy your ability to put on muscle mass. The body, however, will adapt to whatever you're training it for.

So if you are training to be an excellent 10+km runner, a way to do that is to be lighter and spend less resources maintaining large muscle mass. Extensive cardio will result in your body releasing catabolic (the opposite of anabolic) hormones, which will make it harder for you to put on muscle and possibly decrease the muscle mass you have.

This only really applies to situations where you are putting your body under cardiovascular stress for extended periods of time. So like I said before, a 30 minute jog is fine. I wouldn't try and be beating your time on a 10km run though.

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This is simply not true. Extended cardio will cause you to lose muscle mass and will inhibit your body from putting on muscle. I'm not saying a 30 minute jog is going to destroy your ability to put on muscle mass. The body, however, will adapt to whatever you're training it for.

So if you are training to be an excellent 10+km runner, a way to do that is to be lighter and spend less resources maintaining large muscle mass. Extensive cardio will result in your body releasing catabolic (the opposite of anabolic) hormones, which will make it harder for you to put on muscle and possibly decrease the muscle mass you have.

This only really applies to situations where you are putting your body under cardiovascular stress for extended periods of time. So like I said before, a 30 minute jog is fine. I wouldn't try and be beating your time on a 10km run though.

Apologies for the ambiguity. My post was directed at the poster's notion of 5k runs and their potential for him/her to lose mass, in which case the body's signals are sufficient to account for calorie balance.

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This is simply not true. Extended cardio will cause you to lose muscle mass and will inhibit your body from putting on muscle. I'm not saying a 30 minute jog is going to destroy your ability to put on muscle mass. The body, however, will adapt to whatever you're training it for.

So if you are training to be an excellent 10+km runner, a way to do that is to be lighter and spend less resources maintaining large muscle mass. Extensive cardio will result in your body releasing catabolic (the opposite of anabolic) hormones, which will make it harder for you to put on muscle and possibly decrease the muscle mass you have.

This only really applies to situations where you are putting your body under cardiovascular stress for extended periods of time. So like I said before, a 30 minute jog is fine. I wouldn't try and be beating your time on a 10km run though.

Apologies for the ambiguity. My post was directed at the poster's notion of 5k runs and their potential for him/her to lose mass, in which case the body's signals are sufficient to account for calorie balance.

And of course everyone is different.

I haven't spent any notable time in the gym for nearly three years.

I physically work all day. I have committed to running for the past year, running between 30-50k per week. Since October I reduced my running by half but added about 5-7 k of swimming per week as the weather hasnt been that great here this winter.

I've carried the same weight for three years and have slowly actually added two pounds probably due to a bit of an increase in leg muscle from runs.

I switch it up a lot now. In the winter I was running and immediately swimming after....the days that i do one only I notice a significant strength increase in the swim especially. Also coupled with the fact that I've already worked all day outside.

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And of course everyone is different.

I haven't spent any notable time in the gym for nearly three years.

I physically work all day. I have committed to running for the past year, running between 30-50k per week. Since October I reduced my running by half but added about 5-7 k of swimming per week as the weather hasnt been that great here this winter.

I've carried the same weight for three years and have slowly actually added two pounds probably due to a bit of an increase in leg muscle from runs.

I switch it up a lot now. In the winter I was running and immediately swimming after....the days that i do one only I notice a significant strength increase in the swim especially. Also coupled with the fact that I've already worked all day outside.

And it depends on what your goals are.

When most men go to the gym to lift weights, the goal is to put on lean muscle mass and/or get stronger. I'm not saying that cardio will cause you to shrivel up into a frail shell of a man. If done in excess, it will, however, make it very difficult to put on lean mass. Using your example, 2 lbs of lean mass in 3 years would not be considered good gains for a weight lifter.

Like you said, everyone is different, and everyone has different goals. Whatever your goals are, you should look to accomplish them efficiently.

I'd also really agree with the posters saying you don't need to spend two hours in the gym. Some of my best workouts have been under 30 minutes. If I go in and hit the weights hard 30 minutes can be a lot. Throw in 10 minutes of relatively light cardio before and after (to warm up and cool down), and you've got yourself a great workout.

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And it depends on what your goals are.

When most men go to the gym to lift weights, the goal is to put on lean muscle mass and/or get stronger. I'm not saying that cardio will cause you to shrivel up into a frail shell of a man. If done in excess, it will, however, make it very difficult to put on lean mass. Using your example, 2 lbs of lean mass in 3 years would not be considered good gains for a weight lifter.

Like you said, everyone is different, and everyone has different goals. Whatever your goals are, you should look to accomplish them efficiently.

I'd also really agree with the posters saying you don't need to spend two hours in the gym. Some of my best workouts have been under 30 minutes. If I go in and hit the weights hard 30 minutes can be a lot. Throw in 10 minutes of relatively light cardio before and after (to warm up and cool down), and you've got yourself a great workout.

Myself and another mentioned the short workout as a gooder.

I'm not countering your statements ftr....merely adding to the experiences shared here.

I've trained in many ways. I'm just getting older and am more concerned with the heart and lungs. There are some hereditary issues there.

When I was in my twenties I was full on muscle mutant with the neck and traps and whatnot....

As well in my mid twenties I got into outdoor sports a lot more. Therefore I slowly changed my workouts to simulate and help the activities I was involved in...that's when the heavy lifting more or less ended. I found it worked against me from a mobility/agility/endurance pov. And now I would just way rather be outside. I'm working towards being able to enjoy the outdoor sports as late into my life as I can. After a while these pastimes also involve relationships which I enjoy. I'm the gym I always worked out solo.

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Myself and another mentioned the short workout as a gooder.

I'm not countering your statements ftr....merely adding to the experiences shared here.

I've trained in many ways. I'm just getting older and am more concerned with the heart and lungs. There are some hereditary issues there.

When I was in my twenties I was full on muscle mutant with the neck and traps and whatnot....

As well in my mid twenties I got into outdoor sports a lot more. Therefore I slowly changed my workouts to simulate and help the activities I was involved in...that's when the heavy lifting more or less ended. I found it worked against me from a mobility/agility/endurance pov. And now I would just way rather be outside. I'm working towards being able to enjoy the outdoor sports as late into my life as I can. After a while these pastimes also involve relationships which I enjoy. I'm the gym I always worked out solo.

I'm in my mid 30s now, and I hear you on the mobility thing. It's especially bad for people who work desk jobs.

Also physically priorities change when you get older. I always struggled to put on weight in my early twenties... That changed big time later on.

Edited by taxi

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Is your core strong - your guts? Do you do cardio/breathe properly?

Lotta forces goin on in the abdomen with the kind of weight you're working with....weak core or neglected core and injury just around the corner.

Stretch. Acupuncture. Massage.

I neglected core for months; at least isolation exercises. it's one of the things I don't enjoy doing a whole lot. I did some isolation the other night though to be honest because I have been meaning to get back at it. Did some of my previous core routine; can't hurt to do more often but I did feel fine..

Yeah that's some serious weight. Slim margin for error. I'd cut that weight in half until you're 100% again.

I always play it safe with squats and deadlifts. I could care less what the guy next ti me is doing (not saying you do), so I always start lighter and add weight through sets. I almost never push more than maybe 85% of my max. It's just not worth it to me. I'm old enough and have learned through injuries on more than one occasion. My body just doesn't recover like it used to.

That said, my workout goals could be drastically different from yours, I dunno.

Yeah, maybe, seems like a waste of energy and time though and better off avoiding altogether then.

I don't care what others do either. I do this for myself. I don't even like talking about how much I do (although I am proud because its a lot of work) or anything because nobody really cares, nor do I care what they do, but for the sake of conversation here and knowing what is going on I figured it was worth mentioning :lol: . I guess my goal is to stay stronger and relatively fit since if I don't do this I have nothing else going on for activity.

taking time off deadlifts should definately help. I know a buddy took 3 weeks off then started doing sumo for 3-4 months. Went back to conventional and smashed his previous PR's within weeks. Sumo has direct carryover to conventional so i would recommend it to break through plateaus and ease your way back into deadlifted (starting light of course).

I will probably do that. But I hate taking time off like that because I feel like I lose a lot of strength by not even doing it. And then you basically have to spend time getting back something you already had..

I made a post here around Christmas how I took a week off around that time, and then the first day back I went to do deadlifts and had to drop 50lbs because I couldn't do more than a few sets otherwise. :lol:. Nailed it the week after though. Turned out to be because I didn't eat as much as I should have. But I think not doing a big exercise like that gives the same affect. Maybe I'm wrong?

Watch a video on foam rolling for lower back soreness.

You basically roll out your glutes and hips to loosen the lower back - avoid rolling your spine.

I could try that. Can't hurt at this point :P

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Can you describe the pain + be a little more specific with the location? Would you say it's a sharp, shooting, dull, or ache-type of pain? Does it radiate anywhere? Do you have it doing any other movements (if so, what?)? Does it hurt to touch over the area where the pain occurs?

I would hold off on foam rolling until you can get it properly diagnosed. The last thing you want to do is add more inflammation to an already injured area.

Even without knowing what the problem is, it would be a good idea to refrain from aggravating activities and begin an ice/anti-inflammatory routine ASAP.

I think it's worse than I originally described because I hadn't really felt it too much until the last couple days here working out. It's lower back, like above my ass. It's general soreness in that small area only. It actually feels a little "stiff" at times (I guess would be the best way to describe it) bending over or putting on shorts or pants, lol. But throughout the day otherwise it feels completely fine.

Did leg presses last night. Went through my range of motion and felt some discomfort when I shouldn't have and never have before. Did back tonight. Barbell and V Bar rows; discomfort again making it harder to do what I wanted to do. But as mentioned; doing deadlifts themselves was brutal and un-doable after a while.

Would it make any sense going to a doctor? What do you say? My back is sore from weight lifting? Would he or she send you to a chiropractor or just tell you to take a break? I dunno; never done this before :lol:

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upright rows but some people say they're not safe. I perfer face pulls.

Yeah I never liked the feeling of upright rows. I'll stick with the db reverse flyes and also try face pulls with a resistance band after all.

If the band snaps and hits me in the face I'll look like Börje Salming who's a hero, so that's okay.

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Yeah I never liked the feeling of upright rows. I'll stick with the db reverse flyes and also try face pulls with a resistance band after all.

If the band snaps and hits me in the face I'll look like Börje Salming who's a hero, so that's okay.

I had a Cher band snap on me once. I really felt like such a badass. :)

I don't have problems with upright rows (mind you, I use light girlie weights and just want toning)....I CANNOT FOR THE LIFE OF ME do pushups though. Just feels uncomfortable, even the weakling ones. When I was in peak shape back in 1929, I still could not do them and felt so defeated. I'd work out for 2 hours and then push ups would take me down.

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^^ I eat almonds on the regular. I have cheese every other day usually. No 30 minute runs. Sprinting yes. I usually have carbs all day, but in limited quantity. Lost 15 pounds in the last 6 weeks.

Just lift weights faster. Short rest times. Intense workouts that's all.

yeah but are you shreaded? dropping like 2o punds if you were a couch potato before is not big deal, i mean it is but ithought we were talking about getting amazing results

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I neglected core for months; at least isolation exercises. it's one of the things I don't enjoy doing a whole lot. I did some isolation the other night though to be honest because I have been meaning to get back at it. Did some of my previous core routine; can't hurt to do more often but I did feel fine..

Yeah, maybe, seems like a waste of energy and time though and better off avoiding altogether then.

I don't care what others do either. I do this for myself. I don't even like talking about how much I do (although I am proud because its a lot of work) or anything because nobody really cares, nor do I care what they do, but for the sake of conversation here and knowing what is going on I figured it was worth mentioning :lol: . I guess my goal is to stay stronger and relatively fit since if I don't do this I have nothing else going on for activity.

I will probably do that. But I hate taking time off like that because I feel like I lose a lot of strength by not even doing it. And then you basically have to spend time getting back something you already had..

I made a post here around Christmas how I took a week off around that time, and then the first day back I went to do deadlifts and had to drop 50lbs because I couldn't do more than a few sets otherwise. :lol:. Nailed it the week after though. Turned out to be because I didn't eat as much as I should have. But I think not doing a big exercise like that gives the same affect. Maybe I'm wrong?

I could try that. Can't hurt at this point :P

....Dude, go to a good physiotherapist. They'll be able to tell you what's causing the back pain. Could be anything. A guy I know who was getting weird back pain turned out to have a problem with his foot. The imbalance was traveling up his posterior chain into his lower back. Or you might have something more serious like a herniated disc...

As for core workouts, the best core workouts are compound exercises like deadlifts and squats. You just cannot go too heavy too quickly if your core is lagging. You aren't going to train your core to support a 400lbs weight by doing crunches and twists.

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anybody got a good biceps plan, I feel like i work out my arms a lot and my trieps get bigger but no my biceps

Best workout for biceps is simple curls. You can do things like 10/10/10s, but all that is doing is increasing the time of your muscle load. You'll get the same effect from a 15 rep bicep curl. I'd suggest seated single arm bicep curls with dumbbells if you are looking to isolate the bicep and make it look bigger.

A lot of the aesthetics of biceps is genetic and depends on where your bicep attaches to the bone. If it attaches closer to the elbow, you will have a longer flat bicep. If it attaches further away from the elbow you will have a peaked round bicep, which is what gives you that "big bicep" look.

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