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hammertime

Tory Sen "The good indigenous residential schools have done"

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2 hours ago, Standing_Tall#37 said:

What's bad about beyond 150 mile house??? 

 

 I would think the premise of this is bad anywhere you go.

 

 Then you have this creep here who played a part in this and in the area was widely suspected of dinking children there; http://m.huffpost.com/ca/entry/6978916

 

it was nice to see charges laid, finally... but it came as no surprise to many that the charges were dropped after he won his immunity necklace for being involved in the 2010 Olympics.

Nothing wrong with 150 Mile House. I used it to state that this person should be taken far away from where she presently lives. 

 

Yeah Furlong is suspect for sure. 

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On ‎3‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 7:35 AM, RUPERTKBD said:

I think you have to consider her age. As someone who went to school in the 60s and 70s, I can tell you that Residential Schools were something that was never even discussed. It's only recently that this "reconciliation" thing has come about.

 

As a kid, I went past the Lejac site many times, blissfully unaware of what it was, or what went on there. (Lejac is about 15 minutes on the Prince George side of Fraser Lake)

 

It was only years later, when I moved to Prince Rupert, (a town about 40% aboriginal) that I started to learn the ugly truth about residential schools. Later when I met my wife (a member of the Wet'suwet'en first nation and who's mother was taken from the Hazertons to Lejac as a child, I learned more. My mother in law rarely speaks about it, but she told my daughter once that she wasn't treated too badly, because she always did exactly as she was told. However, she also said that children who didn't toe the line were treated much worse.

 

The sad truth is that residential schools severed a single purpose: To beat the "indian" out of it's residents. There is no positive to be taken from the fact that such crimes were committed against aboriginal peoples. It really is our national shame.

If this were the 70s I'd be inclined to agree but come on, there is far too much information out now to claim ignorance. We expect far better from someone in her capacity.  

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31 minutes ago, nucklehead said:

If this were the 70s I'd be inclined to agree but come on, there is far too much information out now to claim ignorance. We expect far better from someone in her capacity.  

While I certainly don't think her ignorance is excusable, i disagree that it's not plausible for someone of her age to be unaware of the depth of depravity that went on in residential schools.

 

the information is out there, but people still have to care enough to learn.

Edited by RUPERTKBD

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Some of the most devout cat-lickers out there are aboriginal people, especially the further north you go in this country, not that most of you have been north of what Vancouveites might call north. (I mean PG is only half way up this Province. There are still two Territories north of that yet.)

 

It always struck me me as odd that the victimhood surrounding residential schools also contained a surviving element of a very strict adherence to the Book and the Catholic religion. As an antitheist, I can't present you a better example of how mentally ill religious people are. One one hand, you have the victims and on the other, nuns and church going folk. What's that mental illness called where the kidnapped falls in love with the kidnapper??? 

 

How is it that the Vatican isn't paying the restitution I have to cough up in tax dollars for something I didn't do? Anytime my wife drug me into a church and I saw that collection box come out, I'd start to change temperature and colour. God needs my money and tax? The Church can't support itself, yet they have the Vatican?! I hope the Church of deceit is paying for this issue more than I am. I doubt it. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by 189lb enforcers?

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The senate from which she comes is a vast wasteland of taxpayer dollars.  Though it's purpose in theory is admirable it is just a place to appoint political hacks to a cushy well paid job as a reward from the party they supported.  Duffy, Wallin, Brazeau and countless others... come on now what do these wastes of skin deserve.

 

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23 hours ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

Some of the most devout cat-lickers out there are aboriginal people, especially the further north you go in this country, not that most of you have been north of what Vancouveites might call north. (I mean PG is only half way up this Province. There are still two Territories north of that yet.)

 

It always struck me me as odd that the victimhood surrounding residential schools also contained a surviving element of a very strict adherence to the Book and the Catholic religion. As an antitheist, I can't present you a better example of how mentally ill religious people are. One one hand, you have the victims and on the other, nuns and church going folk. What's that mental illness called where the kidnapped falls in love with the kidnapper??? 

 

How is it that the Vatican isn't paying the restitution I have to cough up in tax dollars for something I didn't do? Anytime my wife drug me into a church and I saw that collection box come out, I'd start to change temperature and colour. God needs my money and tax? The Church can't support itself, yet they have the Vatican?! I hope the Church of deceit is paying for this issue more than I am. I doubt it. 

 

 

 

 

Stockholm syndrome is what you were looking for. 

 

 And yea the Vatican is 1 of 3 places that can be audited to see how much money they have sached away. I've heard Washington, DC is another 1 and the crown(only money stored in public banks has to be made known) , but I digress, the  church should be made to pay financially for there part and anybody who played a part in trying to program the natives of this land should be persecuted for crimes against humanity.

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I'm furious that my tax dollars are being wasted preventing this pitiful excuse for a Canadian from staving to death.

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I don't often admit that I was wrong on these boards, (after all, it happens so rarely B)) but in this case, I was wrong.

 

What I mistook for simple ignorance is really far more, as this proverbial waste of skin is doubling down on the racism. First she goaded a couple of elderly indigenous speakers with a threat of a national audit of Aboriginal spending:

Quote

After hearing testimony about the atrocities committed in residential schools, Senator Lynn Beyak asked survivors at the Senate's Aboriginal peoples committee Wednesday what they thought about her plan for a national audit on all First Nations spending.

Then she went on to lie about how her speech was really about "taxes":
 

Quote

 

"The speech that caused so much hurt and distress was actually a speech about taxes," Beyak said of the remarks she delivered in the Red Chamber when she defended the institutions as well-intentioned.

In fact, little of her initial speech was devoted to the subject of taxes, but rather a recounting of the "good deeds" committed by religious teachers who "didn't mean to hurt anybody."

 

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/lynn-beyak-tells-residential-school-survivors-she-wants-audit-of-all-first-nations-spending/ar-BBz3Utf

 

I can't think of anyone who would cause me to break out the "C" word, but this loathsome woman comes as close as I've ever gotten....

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"...whose remarkable works, good deeds and historical tales in the residential schools go unacknowledged for the most part," she said.

Hey lady, the safety and well being of children was at the heart of the matter...NOTHING supersedes that.  

 

And those going unacknowledged were part of a system that allowed for: " rampant physical, mental and sexual abuse....some 6,000 children died while in care because of malnourishment or disease" and should hang their heads in shame as they are called out and addressed, NOT receive any accolades.  Even if they weren't "involved", turning a blind eye makes you...involved.

 

My good God, some people in this world are SO out of touch.  Honestly, this makes me seethe, how dare she?!  There was nothing good about this abomination of a school "system". 

 

It is heartwrenching and we're just, now, having some light shed on the atrocities.  I love that Gord Downie, in his dying days, is committed to doing just that.

 

 

 

 

 

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On ‎11‎/‎03‎/‎2017 at 8:58 AM, ice orca said:

Scam the Canadian tax payer, get drunk and make big wind.

Well I can do two of those things quite well, just need a way to scam Canadian tax payers....

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I'm not sure if it's been brought up yet but I'd like to add to the discussion. I have known about many of the atrocities committed at these schools for quite awhile but it wasn't until having the privilege of listening to a speech by the son of a residential school survivor that I truly began to understand not only breadth of the atrocities committed by this program but also some of the effects it had on them and future generations. Not only were these children abused but they had their lives and their culture stolen from them. They lost the chance to live a normal life and that has had a perpetual influence on the future generations as they lost the family experience that many of us take for granted. 

 

In one of many stories that was shared, this man recounted an event growing up on a northern reserve that helped illuminate his understanding of what his people had been through and the damage that was done. One day while playing on the streets of his community a group of older children began to bully and demean him while the elders in his family were present. Rather than step in and protect him, or correct the other boys, they simply stared off into the distance and let it happen. They had no idea how to parent as that experience had been taken away from them. They used the only experience they had, that of residential school life, and stood by passively as the boy they were charged with protecting was beaten. These children now have families and still don't have the tools to raise them and the vicious cycle continues. 

 

If I were a more eloquent writer I could have explained it better but I digress. There are many other devastating effects these schools had on indigenous communities and this is just an example of one of them that has a long lasting imprint. How does this ever change if we ignore or trivialize what these people went through? This woman should be ashamed of herself and removed from her position but instead she chooses to double down in her ignorance. It's people like this that prevent positive change from ever happening. 

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On 4/4/2017 at 2:36 PM, JoeyJoeJoeJr. Shabadoo said:

I'm not sure if it's been brought up yet but I'd like to add to the discussion. I have known about many of the atrocities committed at these schools for quite awhile but it wasn't until having the privilege of listening to a speech by the son of a residential school survivor that I truly began to understand not only breadth of the atrocities committed by this program but also some of the effects it had on them and future generations. Not only were these children abused but they had their lives and their culture stolen from them. They lost the chance to live a normal life and that has had a perpetual influence on the future generations as they lost the family experience that many of us take for granted. 

 

In one of many stories that was shared, this man recounted an event growing up on a northern reserve that helped illuminate his understanding of what his people had been through and the damage that was done. One day while playing on the streets of his community a group of older children began to bully and demean him while the elders in his family were present. Rather than step in and protect him, or correct the other boys, they simply stared off into the distance and let it happen. They had no idea how to parent as that experience had been taken away from them. They used the only experience they had, that of residential school life, and stood by passively as the boy they were charged with protecting was beaten. These children now have families and still don't have the tools to raise them and the vicious cycle continues. 

 

If I were a more eloquent writer I could have explained it better but I digress. There are many other devastating effects these schools had on indigenous communities and this is just an example of one of them that has a long lasting imprint. How does this ever change if we ignore or trivialize what these people went through? This woman should be ashamed of herself and removed from her position but instead she chooses to double down in her ignorance. It's people like this that prevent positive change from ever happening. 

Plenty eloquent if you ask me, Joey.

 

There are literally thousands of stories like the one you posted, most of them untold. I think anything like the above narrative, be it ancedotal or not, is valuable, in and of the fact that it might help educate people who may not have been exposed to the realities of the Indian Residential School program.

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15 hours ago, JoeyJoeJoeJr. Shabadoo said:

Props to Ambrose for doing the right thing here. (Although one might wonder why it took so long...:unsure:)

 

Now maybe she needs to take a hard look at these two:

 

Quote

 

Tory Senators have defended Beyak

Some Conservative senators came to Beyak's defence over the last number of weeks.

"Senator Beyak has exercised her right to free speech. We don't want a bunch of yes people on committees who are only going to agree with what everyone else is saying," Senator Don Plett, the Conservative whip, told reporters late last month.

Alberta Conservative Senator Scott Tannas, another member of the Aboriginal peoples committee, also said he didn't think Beyak should be removed from her post.

 

 

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