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StealthNuck

Jay Beagle | #83 | C

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I am totally excited to see how Beagle plays for us this year. Very positive reviews only a couple days into training camp with him being a physical beast beating some Sedin records for being in great shape.

 

I think his locker room presence and his on ice coolness and leadership will help out our junior guys and future leaders like Horvat, Boeser, Pettersson etc.

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On ‎9‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 6:43 PM, Kanukfanatic said:

I am totally excited to see how Beagle plays for us this year. Very positive reviews only a couple days into training camp with him being a physical beast beating some Sedin records for being in great shape.

 

I think his locker room presence and his on ice coolness and leadership will help out our junior guys and future leaders like Horvat, Boeser, Pettersson etc.

Bang on. All this talk of youth is great. I am just as excited to have a vet like Beagle who will let  no rook rest on his laurels.  This guy along with the other 2 new guys. Will make us a much harder team to play. It also allows Bo and EP? More ozone starts, and allows us to put Sutter on the wing. Of all the signings in July. I liked this one the best. Tho I was not a fan of the JT signing. Which I think is already crating  problems for Doogie. Not signing Willy yet. Bringing in guys like Subban and Ennis. IMO are due to the fact it is going to be a mess over their pretty soon. Like resigning Jake. No way they can afford him after AMMM and Willy if he isn't traded.

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A couple good articles on what Jay Beagle brings...

 

https://www.sportsnet.ca/hockey/nhl/canucks-vision-helped-lure-jay-beagle-vancouver/

 

Quote

VANCOUVER – Old Jay Beagle has a farm, and on that farm he had the Stanley Cup.

 

These two things tell you a little bit about Beagle, the 32-year-old centre the rebuilding Vancouver Canucks recruited as a free agent to teach their young players how to work and how to win.

 

After the retirement last April of Daniel and Henrik Sedin, who were the compass point used to guide the Canucks for a decade, the National Hockey League team was so desperate for Beagle it splurged for a four-year, $12-million contract that baffled a lot of people.

 

Coach Travis Green, general manager Jim Benning and former president Trevor Linden so coveted Beagle’s qualities, as a player and as a template for professionalism, the Canucks went double the term they had initially hoped would lure him.

 

On the surface, the only thing crazier than that contract – besides the identical deal for free agent Antoine Roussel – was Beagle’s decision to accept it.

 

Sure, it’s a lot of money. Other teams were willing to give him a lot of money, too, and most of them could offer Beagle a far better chance to win than the Canucks, who are universally picked to finish very near the bottom of the NHL for a fourth straight season.

 

But Beagle, after winning the Stanley Cup in June with the Washington Capitals, chose the Canucks because, well, “I’ve never been afraid of a challenge.”

 

Beagle visited several organizations in the free-agent courting period before July 1, but said no one’s vision for their team and his role in it was as appealing as the Canucks’.

 

“I met with a couple of other teams and I could just tell, the fit wasn’t the same,” Beagle said. “You can probably make that work, make that fit. But it just felt like this was the team I was supposed to go to. It just felt like the right place to be.

 

“I looked at the vision that this organization wanted and how I could help. I’m not afraid of what people say is a rebuild. You come in every day and do your best to win, and you do everything you can to build that culture. It might take three or four years; you just come in every day with a smile on your face and try to build that winning culture.”

 

Beagle has built his career that way.

 

He grew up in Calgary and was undrafted out of the Alberta Junior Hockey League. He attended the University of Alaska-Anchorage for two seasons before starting his professional career at age 22 in the East Coast League.

 

The speedy, six-foot-three centre spent most of the next 3 ½ seasons in the American Hockey League. He played 209 games for the Hershey Bears before finally becoming a regular with the Capitals in 2011.

 

Beagle had seven goals and 22 points in 79 games last season after setting career-highs with 13 and 30 the year before. He was a consistent pro, a reliable checker and penalty-killer, a 60 per cent winner of faceoffs who could be trusted late in games.

 

These things will help the Canucks on the ice. But his greater value could be the ideals Green and Benning hope Beagle instills in talented young players like Brock Boeser and Elias Pettersson, Adam Gaudette, Jonathan Dahlen and Kole Lind, and, next spring or fall, Quinn Hughes.

 

It’s not only the way Beagle plays, it’s the way he practices. It’s how he trains and prepares, his accountability and the way he treats others. Beagle didn’t just keep up to the kids during Green’s demanding training camp last weekend, he led them.

 

https://nationalpost.com/sports/hockey/nhl/vancouver-canucks/kuzma-sutters-role-could-expand-with-beagles-arrival-kids-to-support/wcm/543711ed-8279-47bf-a036-cec18d45fb41

 

Quote

Want to get a rise out of Travis Green? Ask the coach about his pre-season line combinations.

 

Want to get a feel for what’s really going on in the room? Ask Brandon Sutter.

 

The veteran Vancouver Canucks centre has better perspective than most on what’s at play on and off the ice with the NHL club. He gets the Jay Beagle free-agent signing. He understands the methodical youth movement and knows he will be deployed in various roles this season.

 

Sutter is far removed from that “foundational player” label affixed by general manager Jim Benning when the centre was acquired three years ago. Those power play minutes are also ancient history. However, Sutter will be asked again to match up against top lines, prop up better proficiency with defensive-zone faceoffs and improve a 21st-ranked penalty kill.

 

As much as Sutter could talk about his role in all this, he’s more buoyed by the collective and how Beagle can blend in. When Sutter strained his pelvis last November after absorbing a crunching hit from John Moore in New Jersey and was sidelined for 21 games, the roster loss was magnified by Bo Horvat suffering an ankle fracture in early December and missing 18 games.

 

The Canucks lost their mojo in the circle, in the defensive zone and on the penalty kill.

If they stay healthy, the Canucks can now trot out Beagle (58.5 per cent efficiency), Sutter (51.7) and Horvat (53.8) for defensive-zone faceoff dominance, while also adding Beagle and Tim Schaller to the penalty kill mix. That’s a marked improvement and it won’t tax any one player, especially Horvat, who must continue to drive the first-line attack in his quest to better his 22 goals last season in just 64 games.

 

“Having another experienced guy down the middle like Beagle — knowing there’s going to be a young guy (Elias Pettersson) playing somewhere in the lineup — you realize pretty quick how important the position can be when guys get hurt,” the 29-year-old Sutter said Wednesday before facing the split-squad Calgary Flames in a pre-season test.

 

“The team obviously addressed that with Beagle. He’s very experienced and a solid two-way player and that’s the kind of guy you want when things go wrong or sideways. Playing against him and seeing him in training camp, I know he’ll be a perfect fit for us.

 

“On the outside, people get caught up in stats too much, but there’s a day-to-day and minute-by-minute process that goes into it all and he’s been an awesome guy in the dressing room.

 

“We’ve got young players coming in, but they’re all offensive players. We’ve added guys who can battle in their own end and you need that so the young guys can push the pace offensively.”

 

Last fall, Sutter initially combined with Markus Granlund and Derek Dorsett in a shutdown capacity and the trio had remarkable success. This season, Sutter might get more offensive looks, especially if Pettersson struggles with faceoffs.

 

In a division that sports physical and proficient centres in Anze Kopitar (54.1), the injured Ryan Kesler (53.3) and the ageless Joe Thornton (52.0), Pettersson will have to rely on craftiness and his quick hands to win draws. That might be asking a lot.

 

If the Swedish rookie needs another centre on his alignment with a faceoff presence like Sutter, the trickle-down effect will impact other right wingers. The top-six mix has Brock Boeser and Sven Baertschi as staples and Loui Eriksson, Brendan Leipsic and Nikolay Goldobin as curiosities.

 

“I might give him options to play more of an offensive role and I might not,” Green said of Sutter. “He likes his role. He likes taking faceoffs and the responsibility and that’s not going to change. There might be times when I throw both him and Beagle out there.

 

“It’s a good problem to have — two centres who can play solid at both ends of the rink.”

Run all this by Sutter and you get a shrug of the shoulders.

 

He has gained more notoriety in this market for a five-year, US$21.8 million contract extension that has three years remaining — it includes a no-trade clause this season followed by a modified no-trade clause — than finally being what he really is. And that’s versatile.

 

Limited to 11 goals by injury last season, Sutter still had a team-best plus-8 ranking. He did strike for 17 goals in 2016-17, of which four were on the power play.

 

However, the days of being a right-shot option on the first power play are long gone for Suttter. He knows it’s easy to salivate about being on the top unit with Pettersson and Boeser firing from top of the faceoff circles, Horvat as the down-low presence and Baertschi coming off the wall.

 

“I’m comfortable in any situation and if it changes, I’ll fill in where ever they need me,” said Sutter, who might be in the second power play conversation. “It’s easier to play your role when you know what’s expected, but our lines change game to game. I know I’ll probably be with guys who understand both ends of the rink.”

 

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Turned on game late

First thing I shouted was "who the &^@# is 83? I like his effort on PK"  

Now I know  lol

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Beagle was on the ice for almost the entire PK last night in OT!

Edited by J-23

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PK looks so much better with Beagle. Plus, love how he starts those scrums.

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7 minutes ago, Kootenay Gold said:

Nothing but silence from all the posters complaining about JB signing him. Our bottom six is much better with him in the mix.

Not a lot of push back from the Flames when Beagle started crashing the net. Loved it. 

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i said back when i first heard of him coming, that the fans here were going to love his game. i didn't know anything about schaller and  roussel.  i may have to eat crow on goldobin, i hope i do.

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I can say that the thing I like the most about Jay Beagle is how he has changed the PK usage of Bo Horvat.  

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17 minutes ago, TGT68 said:

I can say that the thing I like the most about Jay Beagle is how he has changed the PK usage of Bo Horvat.  

and Loui E

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8 minutes ago, PhillipBlunt said:

crow.jpg

My last house was in a wooded area, and there was hundreds of crows.  Annoying, obnoxious birds.  And then a family of Great Horned Owls discovered that crows are delicious.  That fall I cleaned out a good 100 pairs of crow wings out of the gutters.  Apparently the owls snip them off at the shoulder.

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4 minutes ago, xereau said:

My last house was in a wooded area, and there was hundreds of crows.  Annoying, obnoxious birds.  And then a family of Great Horned Owls discovered that crows are delicious.  That fall I cleaned out a good 100 pairs of crow wings out of the gutters.  Apparently the owls snip them off at the shoulder.

I can't stand crows either. They're smart, but extremely annoying. Owls are such amazingly efficient predators. Where was your last house, if you don't mind me asking?

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1 minute ago, PhillipBlunt said:

I can't stand crows either. They're smart, but extremely annoying. Owls are such amazingly efficient predators. Where was your last house, if you don't mind me asking?

Lavington.  East of Vernon, part of Coldstream.

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4 minutes ago, xereau said:

Lavington.  East of Vernon, part of Coldstream.

Beautiful country up there.

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