Ryan Strome

2019 Election Thread

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2 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

we already have some. A big one in north burnaby and at one helps supply YVR. I'm probably missing one or two.

 

We already have a large active shipping terminal. Two actually. 

 

With the increased safety from the TMX project the risk of a spill damaging the south coast will be greatly reduced KOS. We have 30+ small to medium sized tankers per day already, one more per day of AB oil isn't a big increase but we get all the safety that we currently don't have. 

 

I think if you look at the TMX project from a safety impact perspective its hard not to look at it as a positive. 

Jimmy - of course we have oil infrastructure in place in BC.   I am against the expansion and growth of more infrastructure especially for a dying industry.

Oil spills are one thing.. but a  bitumen spill is a different beast...

 

Of course Jimmy if you know me , you would realize my first choice is for that toxic bitumen to stay in the ground forever. 

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Albertan separatism makes no sense. Becoming a country isn't going to make Alberta's oil any less land locked. In fact they will lose access to the existing pipeline and will hence have even less leverage when dealing with the Americans. You are better off working within the current framework to get a deal done. I am sure threatening separatism makes many Albertans feel warm and fuzzy but it scares absolutely no one, especially in Ottawa. 

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25 minutes ago, Toews said:

Albertan separatism makes no sense. Becoming a country isn't going to make Alberta's oil any less land locked. In fact they will lose access to the existing pipeline and will hence have even less leverage when dealing with the Americans. You are better off working within the current framework to get a deal done. I am sure threatening separatism makes many Albertans feel warm and fuzzy but it scares absolutely no one, especially in Ottawa. 

Impotent rage and middle child level whining.

 

It's not a good look :lol:

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Kevin Pages statement on the Conservatives budgeted platform.  He is not impressed.

 

"I'm a bit disappointed, particularly on this platform, less on the NDP because they just struggled to get a document out period," said Page. "They [the NDP] probably would have liked to have gotten it out a week ago. They just weren't ready.

"But this looks more nefarious from the point of view that, 'We don't want to tell people till after the debates, till people start voting, that this is how we get back to balance.'"

Page said that closing the tax gap is a worthwhile pursuit, one that all the federal parties are pursuing. He said it was a worthy goal but it hasn't been tried in Canada on the scale the Conservative are proposing.

"They deficit-finance tax cuts right away, they start in the early years. And then they have these spending cuts ramping up in the outer years and one of your big components is infrastructure," said Page.

"The one thing you don't do, in any plan, if you're saying this is about competitiveness and productivity when you are doing this, is go after infrastructure, because it's so critical. That truly is an investment."

Page said that economists point to infrastructure spending as a useful tool for boosting a nation's long-term productivity and growth rates.

"Deficit financing tax cuts? That's consumption. If you give me a tax cut I will either spend it or I will just deal with my debt issues with that extra few hundred bucks a year. That provides a temporary boost to the economy, whereas infrastructure definitely is the longer term boost."

Page also said that finding $5 billion in savings from operational expenses would be a challenge — that Harper tried to do it but couldn't find the savings. He also said that cutting $1.5 billion from the foreign aid budget was doable but it would give Canada a very different personality on the world stage.

 

image.png.b738062121956905371693cfcc4b89ca.png

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1 hour ago, Toews said:

Albertan separatism makes no sense. Becoming a country isn't going to make Alberta's oil any less land locked. In fact they will lose access to the existing pipeline and will hence have even less leverage when dealing with the Americans. You are better off working within the current framework to get a deal done. I am sure threatening separatism makes many Albertans feel warm and fuzzy but it scares absolutely no one, especially in Ottawa. 

Kenney is the single loudest mouth behind the separation movement as of late.  Stating that Trudeau is pushing Alberta out but at NO point in time actually speaking any kind of truth about the state of things.

 

https://calgaryherald.com/news/politics/kenney-stoking-alberta-separatism-notions-political-analyst

 

https://nationalpost.com/news/its-about-the-rule-of-law-jason-kenney-launches-legal-challenge-against-controversial-bill-c-69

 

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/separatism-may-be-on-the-rise-in-alberta-after-trans-mountain-decision-kenney-1.4081573

 

But of course...Kenney would never actually be the cause or mouth behind much of the sentiment with his statements at all.  Certainly not.

 

The irony?  Rumours abound about him being the potential next in line for leader of the federal conservatives if Scheer does not in fact win a clear mandate for the party.  Imagine that level of narcissism.  Parachuted in to Alberta, threatens and mumbles about separation, gets offered potential for leader of Canadian federal party, jumps the hell out of the Berta in a hot minute for a new position in hopes of leading a nation he was just threatening to leave if he didn't get his way

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1 hour ago, Warhippy said:

Kevin Pages statement on the Conservatives budgeted platform.  He is not impressed.

 

"I'm a bit disappointed, particularly on this platform, less on the NDP because they just struggled to get a document out period," said Page. "They [the NDP] probably would have liked to have gotten it out a week ago. They just weren't ready.

"But this looks more nefarious from the point of view that, 'We don't want to tell people till after the debates, till people start voting, that this is how we get back to balance.'"

Page said that closing the tax gap is a worthwhile pursuit, one that all the federal parties are pursuing. He said it was a worthy goal but it hasn't been tried in Canada on the scale the Conservative are proposing.

"They deficit-finance tax cuts right away, they start in the early years. And then they have these spending cuts ramping up in the outer years and one of your big components is infrastructure," said Page.

"The one thing you don't do, in any plan, if you're saying this is about competitiveness and productivity when you are doing this, is go after infrastructure, because it's so critical. That truly is an investment."

Page said that economists point to infrastructure spending as a useful tool for boosting a nation's long-term productivity and growth rates.

"Deficit financing tax cuts? That's consumption. If you give me a tax cut I will either spend it or I will just deal with my debt issues with that extra few hundred bucks a year. That provides a temporary boost to the economy, whereas infrastructure definitely is the longer term boost."

Page also said that finding $5 billion in savings from operational expenses would be a challenge — that Harper tried to do it but couldn't find the savings. He also said that cutting $1.5 billion from the foreign aid budget was doable but it would give Canada a very different personality on the world stage.

 

image.png.b738062121956905371693cfcc4b89ca.png

So what they are planning is a whole lot of Voodoo.

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1 hour ago, Warhippy said:

Kenney is the single loudest mouth behind the separation movement as of late.  Stating that Trudeau is pushing Alberta out but at NO point in time actually speaking any kind of truth about the state of things.

 

Kenney leading the Conservatives would be awesome.  He is a big pile of c...... and  will further drive that party into the ground.....

Most Canadians are middle ground in politics....  the Conservative Party needs to understand this and develop policy appealing to the average Canadian. 

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Conservative Party support disappearing faster right now.... than chewing tobacco tins at an Alberta Tractor Pull event.....

 

Crazy last few days.....     Was it Obama endorsement for JT ?

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11 hours ago, Ryan Strome said:

Not really sure what this has to do with my post.

albertan ?

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13 hours ago, kingofsurrey said:

Jimmy - of course we have oil infrastructure in place in BC.   I am against the expansion and growth of more infrastructure especially for a dying industry.

Oil spills are one thing.. but a  bitumen spill is a different beast...

 

Of course Jimmy if you know me , you would realize my first choice is for that toxic bitumen to stay in the ground forever. 

But King, we need to look at each project on its merits, you can't be so rigid on it, there are positives to some of these projects. I was very much against Northern Gateway but on balance TMX does make sense. 

 

Don't take my word for it, this guy used to run the Pembina Institute. 

 

Why this pilloried Alberta environmentalist backs the Trans Mountain pipeline

 

'It’s a tough time to be in the pragmatic, rational middle, particularly on this issue,' says Ed Whittingham

CBC News · Posted: Jun 19, 2019 7:38 PM MT | Last Updated: June 19
 
ed-whittingham.jpg
Environmentalist Ed Whittingham says Ottawa's approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is the right choice for Alberta and Canada. (CBC)
159
comments

Ed Whittingham says he's taken a lot of hits for his views, and those blows are coming from both sides of the political aisle.

If you ask Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, Whittingham — a long-time environmental activist and former executive with the Pembina Institute think tank — is anti-oil and anti-jobs and someone who quit the province's energy regulator before he could be fired by the United Conservative Party government. 

But if you talk to anti-oil activists this week, they might be surprised to hear Whittingham's supposedly in their camp after he professed support for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in a Globe and Mail op-ed.

 

Whittingham spoke to the Homestretch and CBC News at 6 on Wednesday, to share in his own words why as a life-long environmentalist he still feels building a pipeline is the right decision for Alberta and Canada.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Q: So what do you think of the approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion?

A: I think Ottawa made the right decision. I think TMX has been a very polarizing issue, and I think many in Canada and Alberta would agree, and it's been portrayed as an either-or proposition.

That is, you can either have the economic benefits that come with the pipeline or you can have action on climate change.

In the absence of [the Trans Mountain pipeline] we've had our economic backs up against the wall.- Ed Whittingham

I think that we've been able to thread the needle on a both-and proposition.

 

Q: So why do you think the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is the right decision for Canada, right now?

A: I've had the benefit of spending a lot of time with CEOs of some of the biggest energy industries in the country, headquartered here in Calgary.

They've laid out very clearly that our industry needs to move from a high-carbon, high-cost quadrant with its oil, to a low-carbon, low-cost one. It's an existential challenge and one that we're up for.

To do that, you need to be in a position of financial strength.

So the Trans Mountain pipeline, in the absence of it right now we've had our economic backs up against the wall. It's going to create some of the financial capacity we need to make those investments, to retool our companies and our economy so we're competitive in a low carbon economy.

Q: What kind of reaction are you getting to your position?

A: As you might imagine, mixed. It's a tough time to be in the pragmatic, rational middle, particularly on this issue.

And if you're in the middle, you're going to take some shots.

But, hey, these views are my own and I felt it important to say what I think.

Q: What do you think of the federal government saying some of the profits will go toward green energy programs?

A: I think it's the right decision and this enhances the financial proposition with the approval.

What the prime minister committed to was investing not just the proceeds made from operating the pipeline, a pipeline that you and I and every Canadian owns, but also the sale proceeds. And those sale proceeds will be in the billions.

Q: Has the federal government done enough to address environmental concerns?

A: I think they have. There are important conditions in place on this.

One, although this might be unpopular with some Albertans, the federal government has committed to ensuring there's a carbon tax in place in Alberta and every dollar that's collected will be reinvested back in the province for things like energy efficiency upgrades, public transit, etc.

Two, they've been clear that the emissions limit has to stay. And either Alberta needs to move forward with regulating that hundred megaton oilsands emissions limit, which gives the world certainty on the overall GHG footprint of the oilsands, or that they're going to step in and ensure that's in place.

Q: What do you make of Alberta Premier Jason Kenney getting rid of the carbon tax?

A: I think it's the wrong move, frankly.

I think the federal government has been right to say, 'hey, this is a national proposition. If we're going to hit our Paris 2 C climate target, our international obligation, then we can't afford to take the most important tool off the table.

If you want to reduce pollution, put a price on it.

 
tmx-pipeline-20190618.jpg
Pipe for the Trans Mountain pipeline is unloaded in Edson, Alta., on Tuesday. (Jason Franson/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Q: Federal Conservative leader Andrew Scheer released his climate change plan today and it does not include a carbon tax, but his approach appears to be to tax the heaviest polluters. What do you make of that program?

A: I'd call it half a plan.

It's great that he's maintained the commitment to price carbon emissions from industry.

It notably lacks a target.

We're also missing what CEOs and economists agree is the most important tool in the toolbox, and that is a carbon price.

Q: What would you say to the people of B.C., specifically the lower mainland, who are strictly opposed to any expansion of the oilsands?

A: I'd invite them to come to Alberta and say Albertans are trying their best to turn this ship around, to ensure our energy resources are competitive in a global, low carbon economy.

It's tough to do that when you can't make your mortgage payments.

Q: As an environmentalist, as an Albertan, do you put yourself in the optimist or pessimist column as to whether we can address climate change?

A: I'm probably an optimist to a fault, even when I'm taking punches for my views.

I have a tremendous amount of faith in Albertans, I've had the honour of living in this province for decades.

I'm very proud of what we've been able to do.

And that's why I decided to raise my voice and decided to say hey, on the balance of things, this pipeline is very important.

 

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/ed-whittingham-trans-mountain-pipeline-1.5182376

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1 minute ago, Jimmy McGill said:

But King, we need to look at each project on its merits, you can't be so rigid on it, there are positives to some of these projects. I was very much against Northern Gateway but on balance TMX does make sense. 

 

Don't take my word for it, this guy used to run the Pembina Institute. 

 

Why this pilloried Alberta environmentalist backs the Trans Mountain pipeline

 

'It’s a tough time to be in the pragmatic, rational middle, particularly on this issue,' says Ed Whittingham

CBC News · Posted: Jun 19, 2019 7:38 PM MT | Last Updated: June 19
 
ed-whittingham.jpg
Environmentalist Ed Whittingham says Ottawa's approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is the right choice for Alberta and Canada. (CBC)
159
comments

Ed Whittingham says he's taken a lot of hits for his views, and those blows are coming from both sides of the political aisle.

If you ask Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, Whittingham — a long-time environmental activist and former executive with the Pembina Institute think tank — is anti-oil and anti-jobs and someone who quit the province's energy regulator before he could be fired by the United Conservative Party government. 

But if you talk to anti-oil activists this week, they might be surprised to hear Whittingham's supposedly in their camp after he professed support for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in a Globe and Mail op-ed.

 

Whittingham spoke to the Homestretch and CBC News at 6 on Wednesday, to share in his own words why as a life-long environmentalist he still feels building a pipeline is the right decision for Alberta and Canada.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Q: So what do you think of the approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion?

A: I think Ottawa made the right decision. I think TMX has been a very polarizing issue, and I think many in Canada and Alberta would agree, and it's been portrayed as an either-or proposition.

That is, you can either have the economic benefits that come with the pipeline or you can have action on climate change.

In the absence of [the Trans Mountain pipeline] we've had our economic backs up against the wall.- Ed Whittingham

I think that we've been able to thread the needle on a both-and proposition.

 

Q: So why do you think the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is the right decision for Canada, right now?

A: I've had the benefit of spending a lot of time with CEOs of some of the biggest energy industries in the country, headquartered here in Calgary.

They've laid out very clearly that our industry needs to move from a high-carbon, high-cost quadrant with its oil, to a low-carbon, low-cost one. It's an existential challenge and one that we're up for.

To do that, you need to be in a position of financial strength.

So the Trans Mountain pipeline, in the absence of it right now we've had our economic backs up against the wall. It's going to create some of the financial capacity we need to make those investments, to retool our companies and our economy so we're competitive in a low carbon economy.

Q: What kind of reaction are you getting to your position?

A: As you might imagine, mixed. It's a tough time to be in the pragmatic, rational middle, particularly on this issue.

And if you're in the middle, you're going to take some shots.

But, hey, these views are my own and I felt it important to say what I think.

Q: What do you think of the federal government saying some of the profits will go toward green energy programs?

A: I think it's the right decision and this enhances the financial proposition with the approval.

What the prime minister committed to was investing not just the proceeds made from operating the pipeline, a pipeline that you and I and every Canadian owns, but also the sale proceeds. And those sale proceeds will be in the billions.

Q: Has the federal government done enough to address environmental concerns?

A: I think they have. There are important conditions in place on this.

One, although this might be unpopular with some Albertans, the federal government has committed to ensuring there's a carbon tax in place in Alberta and every dollar that's collected will be reinvested back in the province for things like energy efficiency upgrades, public transit, etc.

Two, they've been clear that the emissions limit has to stay. And either Alberta needs to move forward with regulating that hundred megaton oilsands emissions limit, which gives the world certainty on the overall GHG footprint of the oilsands, or that they're going to step in and ensure that's in place.

Q: What do you make of Alberta Premier Jason Kenney getting rid of the carbon tax?

A: I think it's the wrong move, frankly.

I think the federal government has been right to say, 'hey, this is a national proposition. If we're going to hit our Paris 2 C climate target, our international obligation, then we can't afford to take the most important tool off the table.

If you want to reduce pollution, put a price on it.

 
tmx-pipeline-20190618.jpg
Pipe for the Trans Mountain pipeline is unloaded in Edson, Alta., on Tuesday. (Jason Franson/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Q: Federal Conservative leader Andrew Scheer released his climate change plan today and it does not include a carbon tax, but his approach appears to be to tax the heaviest polluters. What do you make of that program?

A: I'd call it half a plan.

It's great that he's maintained the commitment to price carbon emissions from industry.

It notably lacks a target.

We're also missing what CEOs and economists agree is the most important tool in the toolbox, and that is a carbon price.

Q: What would you say to the people of B.C., specifically the lower mainland, who are strictly opposed to any expansion of the oilsands?

A: I'd invite them to come to Alberta and say Albertans are trying their best to turn this ship around, to ensure our energy resources are competitive in a global, low carbon economy.

It's tough to do that when you can't make your mortgage payments.

Q: As an environmentalist, as an Albertan, do you put yourself in the optimist or pessimist column as to whether we can address climate change?

A: I'm probably an optimist to a fault, even when I'm taking punches for my views.

I have a tremendous amount of faith in Albertans, I've had the honour of living in this province for decades.

I'm very proud of what we've been able to do.

And that's why I decided to raise my voice and decided to say hey, on the balance of things, this pipeline is very important.

 

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/ed-whittingham-trans-mountain-pipeline-1.5182376

Solid read.  And yes he's right.

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2 hours ago, Warhippy said:

Solid read.  And yes he's right.

The sad thing is, I think most of us agree with him. Yet we're all accused of "blocking Alberta", or being "hypocrites", because we have a computer and a cell phone....and a car....

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Definitely the type of answer you give when you're either ashamed of what you've done or you know it was shady as shart. Definitely not what a leader does.

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1 hour ago, RUPERTKBD said:

The sad thing is, I think most of us agree with him. Yet we're all accused of "blocking Alberta", or being "hypocrites", because we have a computer and a cell phone....and a car....

thats why we desperately need to figure out how to have a rational discussion around Canadian energy, whatever that outcome is. It feels like we've all let it get off the rails (no pun intended). 

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4 hours ago, Jimmy McGill said:

But King, we need to look at each project on its merits, you can't be so rigid on it, there are positives to some of these projects. I was very much against Northern Gateway but on balance TMX does make sense. 

 

Don't take my word for it, this guy used to run the Pembina Institute. 

 

Why this pilloried Alberta environmentalist backs the Trans Mountain pipeline

 

'It’s a tough time to be in the pragmatic, rational middle, particularly on this issue,' says Ed Whittingham

 

Guy is bang on

I can tell because both extreme alternative sides hate what he says

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