Ryan Strome

Liberals win minority government

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14 hours ago, Ryan Strome said:

Lol ok yankee.

Yankee?! :shock:

 

image.png.a3e7b17cb40d8c55791e91c9eda9edce.png

 

You have insulted me, suh....:angry:

 

Pistols at dawn?

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3 hours ago, Ryan Strome said:

A strong dollar is indicative of a strong economy. So if others cannot make it with a stronger dollar governments need to make it easier for businesses to succeed in Canada.

true, but a strong economy also needs to be a diversified one. As we've seen, boom and bust is a pretty painful when its not going well. 

 

I'd say the government is doing a good job of that, via our current equalization formula wouldn't you say? the money has to come from somewhere. 

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2 hours ago, Jimmy McGill said:

true, but a strong economy also needs to be a diversified one. As we've seen, boom and bust is a pretty painful when its not going well. 

 

I'd say the government is doing a good job of that, via our current equalization formula wouldn't you say? the money has to come from somewhere. 

No.

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1 hour ago, Ryan Strome said:

No.

So whats your alternative to help support manufacturers hurt by the oil driven high dollar? 

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2 hours ago, Jimmy McGill said:

So whats your alternative to help support manufacturers hurt by the oil driven high dollar? 

Promote those companies to the EU. :bigblush:

Edited by Ryan Strome
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11 hours ago, Ryan Strome said:

Promote those companies to the EU. :bigblush:

Oh you'd love the EU, all that extra governing for nothing.

 

I do think its important that Albertans recognize that its not all one-way, and hasn't been. Yes the oil revenue is nice, but here is also a negative effect on other industries and provinces. Alberta benefits from being in confederation  but that never gets discussed either. 

 

Alberta needs to drop the fight mentality, its not going to get you anything more. 

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22 hours ago, Ryan Strome said:

You would know sad.

Every time I get a notification that you have responded to me, yes I feel sad.  it's like knowing there's a tumour connected to you that won't pipe down or contribute, it just sits like a parasite.

 

Make a statement, you call me a yankee.  Can't refute it, can't do squat but degrade people.  That's your level of discussion.  Good to know you've managed to come full circle though from communist, to socialist to yankee now when you know you have less than jack or squat.

 

Strome.  The Wellwood of the off topic section.

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15 hours ago, Ryan Strome said:

Promote those companies to the EU. :bigblush:

So, let those companies invest their money promoting themselves to the EU.

 

We don't do socialism for multi billion dollar corporations outside of Alberta.  

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@Alflives this is why I believe your thinking on the senate is out of date. Yes it was a partisan brothel for about 30 years, but the reforms Trudeau brought in starting in opposition are actually creating real changes. These guys aren't chained to a PMO or opposition leader anymore, they can do what they want. 

 

Two more senators defect to upstart group, one citing Scheer's leadership

 

Two more senators are leaving their caucuses to join the upstart Canadian Senators Group — with Conservative Quebec Sen. Jean-Guy Dagenais citing his discontent with Andrew Scheer's leadership as the reason for his defection.

The other defector, P.E.I. Sen. Percy Downe, is also joining the CSG — only days after he agreed to disband the Senate Liberal caucus and sit with his former colleagues as a member of the Progressive Senate Group.

The departures come as Canada's upper house is in a state of flux. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's push to rid the Senate of partisanship through the appointment of Independent senators has effectively dismantled the Liberal and Conservative duopoly that has long dominated the Red Chamber.

 

Trudeau's re-election suggests his reforms are set to take on a more permanent form — which has pushed some senators to shed their party stripes.

The CSG is a group of former Conservative and Independent senators, most them conservative-leaning parliamentarians appointed by former prime minister Stephen Harper. With the two additions, the CSG now has 13 members.

Dagenais said Monday that Scheer disappointed in the last federal election. He said Scheer's social conservatism on issues such as same-sex marriage and abortion torpedoed the party's fortunes in Quebec.

Dagenais said he made up his mind to leave the Conservative Senate caucus after sitting through the party's election post-mortem meeting, which saw members discuss what went wrong with the party's campaign strategy. Beyond the leader's stance on contentious social issues, Dagenais said Scheer attached a "low importance" to Quebec and he could no longer sit as a member of his caucus as a result.

"We have wasted a unique opportunity and the result will be the same the next time if the current leader and those who advise him remain in office, as is the case at this time," Dagenais said in a statement.

Downe's move, meanwhile, has badly damaged the days-old Progressive Senate Group.

 

Under Senate rules, a group or caucus must have at least nine members to be considered "recognized" — a designation that gives a group extra funding for staff and research. With Downe gone, the Progressive Senate Group has eight members.

The Senate's website removed any reference to the Progressives Monday, re-classifying those senators as "non-affiliated."

Downe's defection, paired with two upcoming retirements early in the new year, means the now-defunct caucus likely will lose its $410,000 in annual funding at the end of this fiscal year. The addition of new recruits would save the Progressives from extinction.

Downe's departure also puts Progressive seats on committees in jeopardy, as the group no longer has any official standing in the chamber. Most of the Senate's "sober second thought" function happens at committee meetings and seats are prized by members of the upper house.

Before his appointment to the Senate in 2003, Downe served as chief of staff to former prime minister Jean Chrétien.

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Just now, Jimmy McGill said:

@Alflives this is why I believe your thinking on the senate is out of date. Yes it was a partisan brothel for about 30 years, but the reforms Trudeau brought in starting in opposition are actually creating real changes. These guys aren't chained to a PMO or opposition leader anymore, they can do what they want. 

 

Two more senators defect to upstart group, one citing Scheer's leadership

 

Two more senators are leaving their caucuses to join the upstart Canadian Senators Group — with Conservative Quebec Sen. Jean-Guy Dagenais citing his discontent with Andrew Scheer's leadership as the reason for his defection.

The other defector, P.E.I. Sen. Percy Downe, is also joining the CSG — only days after he agreed to disband the Senate Liberal caucus and sit with his former colleagues as a member of the Progressive Senate Group.

The departures come as Canada's upper house is in a state of flux. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's push to rid the Senate of partisanship through the appointment of Independent senators has effectively dismantled the Liberal and Conservative duopoly that has long dominated the Red Chamber.

 

Trudeau's re-election suggests his reforms are set to take on a more permanent form — which has pushed some senators to shed their party stripes.

The CSG is a group of former Conservative and Independent senators, most them conservative-leaning parliamentarians appointed by former prime minister Stephen Harper. With the two additions, the CSG now has 13 members.

Dagenais said Monday that Scheer disappointed in the last federal election. He said Scheer's social conservatism on issues such as same-sex marriage and abortion torpedoed the party's fortunes in Quebec.

Dagenais said he made up his mind to leave the Conservative Senate caucus after sitting through the party's election post-mortem meeting, which saw members discuss what went wrong with the party's campaign strategy. Beyond the leader's stance on contentious social issues, Dagenais said Scheer attached a "low importance" to Quebec and he could no longer sit as a member of his caucus as a result.

"We have wasted a unique opportunity and the result will be the same the next time if the current leader and those who advise him remain in office, as is the case at this time," Dagenais said in a statement.

Downe's move, meanwhile, has badly damaged the days-old Progressive Senate Group.

 

Under Senate rules, a group or caucus must have at least nine members to be considered "recognized" — a designation that gives a group extra funding for staff and research. With Downe gone, the Progressive Senate Group has eight members.

The Senate's website removed any reference to the Progressives Monday, re-classifying those senators as "non-affiliated."

Downe's defection, paired with two upcoming retirements early in the new year, means the now-defunct caucus likely will lose its $410,000 in annual funding at the end of this fiscal year. The addition of new recruits would save the Progressives from extinction.

Downe's departure also puts Progressive seats on committees in jeopardy, as the group no longer has any official standing in the chamber. Most of the Senate's "sober second thought" function happens at committee meetings and seats are prized by members of the upper house.

Before his appointment to the Senate in 2003, Downe served as chief of staff to former prime minister Jean Chrétien.

I accept that change is hopeful, but then why did JT appoint to staunchly liberal people recently?  It's all just propaganda.  Say one thing, while doing another.  It's being two faced.  

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Just now, Alflives said:

I accept that change is hopeful, but then why did JT appoint to staunchly liberal people recently?  It's all just propaganda.  Say one thing, while doing another.  It's being two faced.  

you'll have to give me a for instance on who you think is a problem appointment. I don't think having links to one party or another invalidates you, lots of good people have been politically active. 

 

What makes it different today tho is the fact that there aren't any strings attached. There's nothing Trudeau can do to force them to vote one way or another, thats a pretty big deal. 

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3 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

you'll have to give me a for instance on who you think is a problem appointment. I don't think having links to one party or another invalidates you, lots of good people have been politically active. 

 

What makes it different today tho is the fact that there aren't any strings attached. There's nothing Trudeau can do to force them to vote one way or another, thats a pretty big deal. 

I posted a link a couple pages back.  

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10 minutes ago, Alflives said:

I posted a link a couple pages back.  

is it the former liberal candidate? yeah I can see how that isn't kosher for many. But I still would argue that the new system of not being PMO controlled is far better than what we had. I guess in this case JT is hoping for someone to vote along his way of thinking most of the time. Is that the same as in the past where these guys were whipped to vote a certain way? absolutely not. We even have conservatives breaking ranks today, thats actually pretty stunning. 

 

We have to look for whats positive in the system, Alf. We can't fall into the "everything is sh!t" mentality, because if thats all we can envision thats all we'll get. 

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Just now, bishopshodan said:

Way to go Freeland.

 

Well deserved. 

yup shes a smart cookie. Even @Ryan Strome likes her. I guess now we'll find out who's more reasonable, Jason Kenney or Donald Trump. 

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3 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

yup shes a smart cookie. Even @Ryan Strome likes her. I guess now we'll find out who's more reasonable, Jason Kenney or Donald Trump. 

Was very happy to hear that news. I like her a lot too. Hopefully she can get some proper discussion going to get our country back on track. 

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3 minutes ago, bishopshodan said:

Was very happy to hear that news. I like her a lot too. Hopefully she can get some proper discussion going to get our country back on track. 

if anyone can, its her. I'm not convinced that Kenney or Moe want it to though. They seem to prefer the "fight" model and Kenney spreads bs like a potato farmer. 

 

But... she's very smart. She might be able to re-frame the national conversation and force Kenney back to a more reasonable position. 

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On 11/8/2019 at 4:01 PM, kingofsurrey said:

Well i have lived in BC, Alberta and Quebec... travelled North America, Mexico, most of Europe, north Africa and parts of Asia....

 

So not really sure what you mean by travelling much. I have travelled more than some and less than others.  Travelling really changes you as a person, makes you grow as an individual. 

You’re well travelled physically but mentally still searching.  Hey!  Tkatchuk should be in a Canuck jersey right now. Agreed?  

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On 11/20/2019 at 10:21 AM, Jimmy McGill said:

if anyone can, its her. I'm not convinced that Kenney or Moe want it to though. They seem to prefer the "fight" model and Kenney spreads bs like a potato farmer. 

 

But... she's very smart. She might be able to re-frame the national conversation and force Kenney back to a more reasonable position. 

I can see her be as a future PM.  Let her learn the ropes as a Deputy PM so she get as much knowledge (what works and what doesn't) to succeed in the future.  I loved it when she stood up to protect and acted in the best interest for Canada. 

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