Ryan Strome

Liberals win minority government

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42 minutes ago, Ryan Strome said:

@Jimmy McGill this is concerning especially when you take into consideration what @Warhippy said about a looming massive recession. 

 

This will only lead to massive, deep cuts. Austerity measures. So sad so many support insane spending. 

Well, when you break down the programs people like/want they represent the overwhelming majority of government spending.   Even people who occupy the fiscal conservative side are included.   Most of the programs that people would list as excessive represents pennies on the dollar.  I agree that cuts are gonna hurt real bad.

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12 minutes ago, thedestroyerofworlds said:

Well, when you break down the programs people like/want they represent the overwhelming majority of government spending.   Even people who occupy the fiscal conservative side are included.   Most of the programs that people would list as excessive represents pennies on the dollar.  I agree that cuts are gonna hurt real bad.

I'm not even sure it's right, left, conservative or liberal many Canadians have come to expect so much to be free.

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31 minutes ago, Ryan Strome said:

I'm not even sure it's right, left, conservative or liberal many Canadians have come to expect so much to be free.

So I dont have to pay taxes for my "free" stuff.  Wait.  Taxes pay for that "free" stuff so they aren't free then are they.

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4 minutes ago, thedestroyerofworlds said:

So I dont have to pay taxes for my "free" stuff.  Wait.  Taxes pay for that "free" stuff so they aren't free then are they.

So you want higher taxes. Cool. Problem the majority that want higher taxes don't pay much in taxes. But good point I was trying to be nice and give you the benefit of the doubt.

Glad you admit the clown you voted for spends like a drunken sailor. 

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52 minutes ago, Ryan Strome said:

So you want higher taxes. Cool. Problem the majority that want higher taxes don't pay much in taxes. But good point I was trying to be nice and give you the benefit of the doubt.

Glad you admit the clown you voted for spends like a drunken sailor. 

Never said I wanted higher taxes.  

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3 hours ago, Ryan Strome said:

@Jimmy McGill this is concerning especially when you take into consideration what @Warhippy said about a looming massive recession. 

 

This will only lead to massive, deep cuts. Austerity measures. So sad so many support insane spending. 

it is, and it will. But we have Trump stimulus spending and we have Trudeau stimulus spending, not quite to the same degree as Trumpy but it worries me too. 

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i know this has little to do with the current Liberal government (or any particular past Canadian government, for that matter) but I think it's interesting to note which countries score highly in upward mobility (going from poor to wealthy) and which do not:

 

https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/20/business/wef-social-mobility-index/index.html

 

Quote

 

London (CNN Business)If you're born in the United States, having wealthy parents matters a great deal to your chances of success, according to a new report.

Individuals born into poorer families have a better chance of owning a home, getting a good education and experiencing a better life than their parents if they are born in Canada than if they are born in the United States. In other words, Canadians have a better shot at the American Dream than Americans do.
That's according to the World Economic Forum's Global Social Mobility Index, which ranks 82 countries on their citizens' ability to fulfill their potential regardless of their socio-economic background.
 
The report was published Monday to coincide with the start of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, where global income inequality is a recurring theme.
 
The index ranks economies across five dimensions: health, education, technology access, work (in terms of opportunities, conditions and fair wages), and protection and institutions.
 
Germany is the most socially mobile country among the G7, ranking 11th overall, followed by France (12th), Canada (14th), Japan (15th), the United Kingdom (21st), the United States (27th) and Italy (34th).
Nordic countries, including Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Iceland, have the best social mobility scores.
 
Among the world's large emerging economies, Russia ranks 39th, followed by China (45th), Brazil (60th), India (76th) and South Africa (77th).
"The headline finding of the report is that most economies are failing to provide the conditions in which their citizens can thrive, often by a large margin," the World Economic Forum said in a statement Monday.
"As a result, an individual's opportunities in life remain tethered to their socio-economic status at birth, entrenching historical inequalities," the statement added.

 

Wealthy parents

 

As it stands right now, in the United States, it takes five generations for a low-income family to reach median income, but that number could change. This statistic is better than it is in Germany and France, but worse than it is in Canada, Australia and Denmark, which has the best social mobility score overall.
The index ranks economies across five dimensions: health, education, technology access, work (in terms of opportunities, conditions and fair wages), and protection and institutions.

 

(More in the link)

 

The gist here is that countries that have been described on these boards as highly taxed hellholes, with generous social safety nets and high education standards, give their residents a much better chance at escaping the cycle of poverty than do countries where poor folks are fed the lie that "hard work" is all you need to become successful.

 
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35 minutes ago, RUPERTKBD said:

i know this has little to do with the current Liberal government (or any particular past Canadian government, for that matter) but I think it's interesting to note which countries score highly in upward mobility (going from poor to wealthy) and which do not:

 

https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/20/business/wef-social-mobility-index/index.html

 

(More in the link)

 

The gist here is that countries that have been described on these boards as highly taxed hellholes, with generous social safety nets and high education standards, give their residents a much better chance at escaping the cycle of poverty than do countries where poor folks are fed the lie that "hard work" is all you need to become successful.

 

Gee, who'd've ever guessed that helping the poor... Helps the poor?

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1 minute ago, Gäz said:

Gee, who'd've ever guessed that helping the poor... Helps the poor?

What's really sad is that a certain orange clown and his cronies will continue to tell the poor people in America of the horrors of "socialism", while touting the fallacy that they can be rich, just like him....

 

...what's left unspoken, of course, is that they'll need a lot of their daddy's money to make it happen....

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https://www.thestar.com/business/opinion/2020/01/14/why-you-can-look-forward-to-a-better-and-better-paying-job-in-the-future.html?fbclid=IwAR3SB4FMd4UiApyeNWg4Lj5CKW4g4ebCdgG1NWwFjY8DkVR6trRd_kEhFqY

 

Last week Statistics Canada released its monthly jobs report for December. Media headlines tend to focus on the month-to-month changes in employment and unemployment. December featured a decent gain of 35,000 jobs, all full-time — reversing losses recorded in November.

But these monthly fluctuations are notoriously volatile, and must be interpreted with caution. Since this report was the last for 2019, we can now take stock of Canada’s labour market performance for the year as a whole. The news was undeniably positive: not only did the quantity of employment expand strongly, there were also encouraging signs of long-needed improvements in the quality of work.

On the quantity side, average employment rose by 390,000 jobs in 2019, compared to 2018. That’s the biggest annual increment since 1979. The unemployment rate averaged 5.7 per cent for the year, the lowest since Statistics Canada began gathering this data in 1976.

 

But I am more excited about evidence of a broad improvement in the quality of work. By several indicators, jobs in Canada became better last year: more full-time jobs, less temporary work, growing unionization and rising wages. These improvements in job quality, if sustained, will underpin future improvement in income equality and social well-being.

Consider just some of these indicators:

  • Almost three-quarters of new jobs in 2019 were full-time positions — and all new jobs since April have been full-time. After years of growing part-time work (generally less secure, with lower wages), the share of full-time jobs is now rebounding.
  • Temporary employment also decreased, on average, in 2019. On a net basis, therefore, all the new jobs last year were permanent — with better pay and more security.
 
  • Self-employment didn’t change in 2019 despite overall employment growth. Hence the share of self-employment declined (to just over 15 per cent), and is now at its lowest since 2002. On average, self-employment offers lower pay, worse productivity and less security than other jobs. With more chance of finding a decent paid job, Canadian workers are now less interested in being their “own boss.”
    • Public sector agencies added a solid 55,000 net jobs in 2019, for a total of 300,000 new positions over the last five years. Here, too, wages and job security tend to be somewhat better. The public sector now engages more than one in five of all Canadian employees.
    • Unionized employment grew by 130,000 positions in 2019: the biggest jump in union jobs since the turn of the century. The share of paid employees (not counting self-employed) in a union grew slightly, to 30.2 per cent.

    The combination of strong job-creation with improvements in job security is supporting a welcome pick-up in wage growth. Average hourly wages rose 3.4 per cent in 2019. That’s the best since 2007 (just before the global financial crisis hit). And wage growth accelerated as the year went on, surpassing 4 per cent over the last half of the year.

    Average incomes for Canadian workers are therefore growing significantly faster than inflation, generating an improvement in real purchasing power. After many years of relatively stagnant real incomes, this is welcome news indeed.

  • Sustained low unemployment and strong employment growth help to explain these improvements in the quality of jobs: employers must sweeten the wages and conditions they offer in order to attract and retain workers. But active government policy has also been important: including higher minimum wages in several provinces, expanded public services (sparking more public sector hiring) and incremental measures (for example, by the federal government) to facilitate unionization and collective bargaining.

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12 hours ago, Warhippy said:

https://www.thestar.com/business/opinion/2020/01/14/why-you-can-look-forward-to-a-better-and-better-paying-job-in-the-future.html?fbclid=IwAR3SB4FMd4UiApyeNWg4Lj5CKW4g4ebCdgG1NWwFjY8DkVR6trRd_kEhFqY

 

Last week Statistics Canada released its monthly jobs report for December. Media headlines tend to focus on the month-to-month changes in employment and unemployment. December featured a decent gain of 35,000 jobs, all full-time — reversing losses recorded in November.

But these monthly fluctuations are notoriously volatile, and must be interpreted with caution. Since this report was the last for 2019, we can now take stock of Canada’s labour market performance for the year as a whole. The news was undeniably positive: not only did the quantity of employment expand strongly, there were also encouraging signs of long-needed improvements in the quality of work.

On the quantity side, average employment rose by 390,000 jobs in 2019, compared to 2018. That’s the biggest annual increment since 1979. The unemployment rate averaged 5.7 per cent for the year, the lowest since Statistics Canada began gathering this data in 1976.

 

But I am more excited about evidence of a broad improvement in the quality of work. By several indicators, jobs in Canada became better last year: more full-time jobs, less temporary work, growing unionization and rising wages. These improvements in job quality, if sustained, will underpin future improvement in income equality and social well-being.

Consider just some of these indicators:

  • Almost three-quarters of new jobs in 2019 were full-time positions — and all new jobs since April have been full-time. After years of growing part-time work (generally less secure, with lower wages), the share of full-time jobs is now rebounding.
  • Temporary employment also decreased, on average, in 2019. On a net basis, therefore, all the new jobs last year were permanent — with better pay and more security.
 
  • Self-employment didn’t change in 2019 despite overall employment growth. Hence the share of self-employment declined (to just over 15 per cent), and is now at its lowest since 2002. On average, self-employment offers lower pay, worse productivity and less security than other jobs. With more chance of finding a decent paid job, Canadian workers are now less interested in being their “own boss.”
    • Public sector agencies added a solid 55,000 net jobs in 2019, for a total of 300,000 new positions over the last five years. Here, too, wages and job security tend to be somewhat better. The public sector now engages more than one in five of all Canadian employees.
    • Unionized employment grew by 130,000 positions in 2019: the biggest jump in union jobs since the turn of the century. The share of paid employees (not counting self-employed) in a union grew slightly, to 30.2 per cent.

    The combination of strong job-creation with improvements in job security is supporting a welcome pick-up in wage growth. Average hourly wages rose 3.4 per cent in 2019. That’s the best since 2007 (just before the global financial crisis hit). And wage growth accelerated as the year went on, surpassing 4 per cent over the last half of the year.

    Average incomes for Canadian workers are therefore growing significantly faster than inflation, generating an improvement in real purchasing power. After many years of relatively stagnant real incomes, this is welcome news indeed.

  • Sustained low unemployment and strong employment growth help to explain these improvements in the quality of jobs: employers must sweeten the wages and conditions they offer in order to attract and retain workers. But active government policy has also been important: including higher minimum wages in several provinces, expanded public services (sparking more public sector hiring) and incremental measures (for example, by the federal government) to facilitate unionization and collective bargaining.

How does adding 35,000 jobs reverse a loss of 71,000?

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25 minutes ago, Ryan Strome said:

How does adding 35,000 jobs reverse a loss of 71,000?

 

24 minutes ago, Ryan Strome said:

The public sector had a net gain of 55,000 in all of 2019?

Lol that's not good.

Kind of nitpicky no?

 

1) Highest net gain in jobs since 1979.

2) 70+% of new jobs were full-time

3) Lowest employment rate since StatCan started measuring in 1976. 

4) Hourly wage increased 3.4%, best since 2007, and heavily outpaces inflation. 

 

2019: More jobs and better quality jobs at higher pay. Canada did really good here. 

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38 minutes ago, Ryan Strome said:

How does adding 35,000 jobs reverse a loss of 71,000?

How many jobs did the nation gain in the entirety of 2019?

 

You're ignoring everything for one snippet of the overall numbers.

 

Again

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7 minutes ago, Duodenum said:

 

Kind of nitpicky no?

 

1) Highest net gain in jobs since 1979.

2) 70+% of new jobs were full-time

3) Lowest employment rate since StatCan started measuring in 1976. 

4) Hourly wage increased 3.4%, best since 2007, and heavily outpaces inflation. 

 

2019: More jobs and better quality jobs at higher pay. Canada did really good here. 

it has to be nitpicked because it doesn't jive with his opinion

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26 minutes ago, Duodenum said:

 

Kind of nitpicky no?

 

1) Highest net gain in jobs since 1979.

2) 70+% of new jobs were full-time

3) Lowest employment rate since StatCan started measuring in 1976. 

4) Hourly wage increased 3.4%, best since 2007, and heavily outpaces inflation. 

 

2019: More jobs and better quality jobs at higher pay. Canada did really good here. 

 

18 minutes ago, Warhippy said:

How many jobs did the nation gain in the entirety of 2019?

 

You're ignoring everything for one snippet of the overall numbers.

 

Again

 

18 minutes ago, Warhippy said:

it has to be nitpicked because it doesn't jive with his opinion

Oh hippy it's no wonder no one likes you on here.

Anyway I was simply asking a question. I believe I have given Trudeau credit for low unemployment in canada, I wish there was better wage growth. What I did find discouraging is as good as those numbers look compared to many other countries we aren't doing that good.

Btw you posted about December yet told me to look at all of 2019. You truly are something else. Go stare at your Trudeau poster, hip

 

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5 hours ago, Ryan Strome said:

 

 

Oh hippy it's no wonder no one likes you on here.

Anyway I was simply asking a question. I believe I have given Trudeau credit for low unemployment in canada, I wish there was better wage growth. What I did find discouraging is as good as those numbers look compared to many other countries we aren't doing that good.

Btw you posted about December yet told me to look at all of 2019. You truly are something else. Go stare at your Trudeau poster, hip

 

Nobody likes me?  Strange.  I happen to have a solid group of friends and interact with a number of people on this page.  Maybe it's just you and your WEXITEERS??? iI'm also not sure, is that supposed to be insulting or something?

 

I posted about December because much like June/July, Decembers numbers need to be taken with a grain of salt.  You said how is X amount of jobs supposed to reverse X amount of jobs.  A year as a whole tells the entire story, a month by month is always a snap shot.  You pick and choose numbers and arguments all the time because you consistently end up on the wrong side of things.

 

Not my issue but you seem to be a bit confused about it.  

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1 hour ago, Warhippy said:

Nobody likes me?  Strange.  I happen to have a solid group of friends and interact with a number of people on this page.  Maybe it's just you and your WEXITEERS??? iI'm also not sure, is that supposed to be insulting or something?

 

I posted about December because much like June/July, Decembers numbers need to be taken with a grain of salt.  You said how is X amount of jobs supposed to reverse X amount of jobs.  A year as a whole tells the entire story, a month by month is always a snap shot.  You pick and choose numbers and arguments all the time because you consistently end up on the wrong side of things.

 

Not my issue but you seem to be a bit confused about it.  

Yeah you must be one of those guys if you say it you believe it's true you have made yourself look so stupid and foolish on here more than anybody on CDC and that's saying a lot. When are you posting the gas receipt you talked about you weren't in Airdrie you weren't even in Alberta you didn't see no gas prices anywhere you grab the report from someplace down in Georgia LOL you have no credibility on anyting. I want to know how gaining 30000 jobs even without the losses from the month before it doesn't say the whole year it's is the month before unless I misunderstood it but again I was only asking a question to the guy that posted it you but you thought I was insulting Trudeau so you had to jump to his defense like you do more than anybody on CDC. Why didn't you touch on the rest if we're doing so good how come Russia has a lower unemployment rate than we do? Maybe everybody is doing good and when you compare all these countries that are doing really really good we don't look so good no more do we? But that doesn't fit your never-ending Narrative of always defending Trudeau.

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I'm glad we're working to ban a weapon that hasn't been used to commit a mass shooting in 30 something years because of various reasons. 

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26 minutes ago, Tortorella's Rant said:

I'm glad we're working to ban a weapon that hasn't been used to commit a mass shooting in 30 something years because of various reasons. 

Yup...Trudeau and his supporters watch to much American news apparently. 

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