Ryan Strome

Liberals win minority government

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12 minutes ago, RUPERTKBD said:

The argument could also be made that keeping kids active will result in lower health care expenditures as well. Certainly, childhood obesity and the health issues that accompany it are a problem in Canada.

 

That being said, people love to complain about taxes, yet many of the same people complain about cuts to social programs. Nothing is free and programs need to be paid for one way or another. Taxpayers will always foot the bill and governments have to make unpopular decisions. That's just the way it is.

 

Generally, I'd agree with Strome. I think funding to keep kids healthier is a worthwhile expenditure, but it's pretty easy to have an opinion....

My big issue is that deduction should be for everyone. Not just kids. Also many fat &^@# kids will be fat &^@# kids regardless due to dumb &^@# parents. 

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54 minutes ago, Ryan Strome said:

I don't disagree but I'm pointing out she was invited in the past so I doubt Bernier gets invited.

Im saying they shouldnt invite fringe parties.Bad enough they give the bloc any time.

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19 minutes ago, Gnarcore said:

My big issue is that deduction should be for everyone. Not just kids. Also many fat &^@# kids will be fat &^@# kids regardless due to dumb &^@# parents. 

Can't argue with that. I wouldn't mind being able to claim my entrance fee for Alzheimer's Hockey.

 

Still, the point remains that if you give a tax break somewhere, you have to take away from a program somewhere else. The overall tax revenue is relatively static, so expenditures needs to follow suit, or the debt continues to grow.

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3 minutes ago, RUPERTKBD said:

Can't argue with that. I wouldn't mind being able to claim my entrance fee for Alzheimer's Hockey.

 

Still, the point remains that if you give a tax break somewhere, you have to take away from a program somewhere else. The overall tax revenue is relatively static, so expenditures needs to follow suit, or the debt continues to grow.

Oh for sure...and some sort of prorated deductible would be suitable.  I spend about 5 grand annually on lift pass, golf pass, gear and this year have gotten back into old fogey hockey like you.  

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Ryan Strome said:

Who is the real conservative party federally? I'm curious to know who you're saying was fiscally conservative?

Bernier and the Peoples Party of Canada is the only true Conservative party federally in Canada.

 

The problem is we have parties with names that don’t actually stand for the party meaning.  There is nothing classically liberal about the Liberal Party, there isn’t much conservative with the Conservative party. 

 

These parties are essentially populist parties with different view points all tailoring themselves to their fan base and which self interest group they need to pander to.  Thats why I respect what Bernier is doing.  You may not agree with his ideology but he’s true to his word and is consistent in his statements and not pandering to any groups, he just wants support from people who believe in limited government, self responsibility and equality of opportunity.

Edited by mpt
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1 hour ago, Ryan Strome said:

@Warhippy it just occurred to me why you like Bernier. Like they say it's the company you keep. Amirite?

 

maxime_bernier_and_juliecouillard.jpeg

Where in this picture do you see Bernier??

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14 minutes ago, MikeyBoy44 said:

Where in this picture do you see Bernier??

Dammit beat me to it

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33 minutes ago, MikeyBoy44 said:

Where in this picture do you see Bernier??

 

18 minutes ago, Warhippy said:

Dammit beat me to it

Exactly.

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Maybe BC can decide an election for a change

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/grenier-trudeau-visits-bc-1.4970103

 

Quote

Why Justin Trudeau will be spending a lot of time in B.C. in 2019

 

British Columbia is key to the Liberals' re-election hopes — and to the Conservatives' plans to topple them

 
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Éric Grenier · CBC News · Posted: Jan 09, 2019 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 7 hours ago
 
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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is in B.C. today, where his party will be looking to win new seats in October's federal election. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)
982 comments

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is in British Columbia today, a province that could play a significant role in a Liberal victory in October's federal election — or form an integral part of a path to government for Andrew Scheer's Conservatives.

Trudeau is in Kamloops to speak at two separate events: a party fundraiser and a town hall with local citizens. The visit puts him far from the scene of two pending byelection contests in the ridings of Burnaby South in the Greater Vancouver region and Nanaimo–Ladysmith on Vancouver Island. But those are just two of the many electoral battlegrounds dotted across the province.

The Liberals won 17 seats in B.C. in the 2015 federal election and picked up another from the Conservatives in a byelection in 2017. The New Democrats took 14 seats, the Conservatives held on to 10 and the Greens retained one (leader Elizabeth May's seat in Saanich–Gulf Islands).

Support hasn't shifted dramatically in the province since the last vote. The CBC Poll Tracker, an aggregation of all publicly available polls, puts the Liberals at 34 per cent support in B.C., down one point since 2015. The Conservatives sit at 32 per cent, a gain of just two points, while the New Democrats have slipped three points to 23 per cent.

At nine per cent, the Greens are up marginally over 2015. Maxime Bernier's People's Party, at just under one per cent support, has not had much of an impact.

 

The trend line has been generally flat in B.C. for some time, with each of the parties wobbling back and forth around their 2015 benchmarks. But the province has become more competitive in recent weeks. The Liberals generally scored between 35 and 37 per cent in the province last fall and enjoyed a seven to 10-point lead over the Conservatives. They have now dipped below the 35 per cent mark as Conservative support spikes.

Whether this is a blip or a real trend remains to be seen — the two parties were also in a close race throughout the spring and summer of last year — but B.C. already had a significant number of potentially close races before the margin closed between the two parties.

Liberals, Conservatives need B.C. in October

The Poll Tracker currently projects that the Conservatives are now in a position to win 17 seats in B.C., with the Liberals down to 15 and the NDP down to nine. May is projected to hold her seat of Saanich–Gulf Islands.

But many seats are in play. The projection model suggests the Liberals are in the running in as many as 22 ridings, with only nine seats considered relatively safe. The Conservatives' range is from nine to 26 seats and the NDP's range is from three to 16.

For the Liberals, this means that B.C. is one of the few regions of the country where the party has some prospect for gains. They could emerge with fewer seats even in the current polling environment, but they could also win a few more. That would go a long way toward compensating for losses the party is poised to suffer in Alberta, the Prairies, Ontario and Atlantic Canada.

 
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Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer likely needs to double his seat count in British Columbia if he is to form government in 2019's federal election. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

Only in Quebec do the Liberals look likely to gain seats, but Quebec alone might not be enough to secure enough new seats for Trudeau to hold on to his majority government. That's where B.C. comes in.

For Scheer and the Conservatives, B.C. is one of the provinces offering the best prospects for gains based on where the polls stand today. And the party will need them; any election that results in a Conservative win will feature a significant contingent of Conservative MPs from B.C. Without doubling his party's representation on the West Coast, Scheer is unlikely to reach the 170 seats required for a majority government.

British Columbia is also the province where the NDP has its highest rate of support. After Quebec, where the party has sagged, B.C. is home to the largest number of its MPs. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is relying on B.C. to give him a seat in the House of Commons in Burnaby South's upcoming byelection — but he's also counting on the province to make up for some of his party's expected losses in Quebec.

Regional battlegrounds from the Island to the Interior

Though the Liberals are polling more strongly in the Vancouver region — a Mainstreet Research poll in the fall gave the party a 12-point edge over the Conservatives there — they also have some opportunities in the B.C. Interior. So Trudeau's visit to Kamloops is no coincidence.

The riding of Kamloops–Thompson–Cariboo was won by Conservative MP Cathy McLeod by 4.8 points over the Liberal candidate, who finished third in a tight three-way race in 2015. Kamloops itself was primarily a NDP-Liberal battleground in 2015, while the Conservatives dominated the rest of the sprawling riding. Winning over some of those NDP votes in Kamloops would help deliver the riding to Trudeau in October.

The neighbouring riding of Central Okanagan–Similkameen–Nicola was won by the Conservatives by just 2.4 points, putting it high on the list of potential Liberal gains in B.C. Only Burnaby South, won by the NDP's Kennedy Stewart by just 1.2 points, ranks more highly as a Liberal prospect.

 
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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau took part in a town hall in Kelowna, B.C. in September, 2017. The party scored an upset in the riding of Kelowna–Lake Country in 2015. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)

As many as 13 of British Columbia's 42 ridings are considered toss-ups by the Poll Tracker's projection model at this point, with the Liberals looking to gain at the NDP's expense in Greater Vancouver and on Vancouver Island. The Conservatives are in the running to pluck both Liberal and NDP seats in the southern interior and the Fraser Valley — the latter region a key target for Scheer's Conservatives.

Though the Greens have slipped in the polls over the last few weeks, they could also make some noise on Vancouver Island. An early test of the federal party's Island support could come in the Nanaimo–Ladysmith byelection.

But British Columbia is not merely a province that could shape the outcome of the federal election — it could be a focal point for some of its key debates. Tuesday was a stark reminder of that, as protests in Ottawa that followed arrests by the RCMP at the Gidimt'en camp in northern B.C. forced the prime minister to move the location of a speech to Indigenous leaders.

Though this particular action was not related to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, B.C. is ground zero for opposition to that project as well. Much of the opposition comes from Indigenous groups in the province (though, as is the case for British Columbians as a whole, that opposition is far from unanimous).

That's a complicating factor for a government that says it wants to build pipelines while fostering a new relationship with Canada's Indigenous peoples — and to appeal to B.C. progressives who want action on climate change and protection for the province's vulnerable coasts.

So today's visit to Kamloops is just the start for the prime minister. Expect to see him — and his opposition rivals — in British Columbia a lot more throughout 2019.

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Shift-4 said:

Maybe BC can decide an election for a change

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/grenier-trudeau-visits-bc-1.4970103

 

for sure it can. This is shaping up to be a really interesting campaign. Will it be Bernier's Revenge? A CPC comeback? The end of Jagmeet? 

 

BC might be the only province where the NDP helps the CPC get some seats. 

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15 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

for sure it can. This is shaping up to be a really interesting campaign. Will it be Bernier's Revenge? A CPC comeback? The end of Jagmeet? 

 

BC might be the only province where the NDP helps the CPC get some seats. 

The way I read the article is there will be massive vote splitting in the province.

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4 minutes ago, Shift-4 said:

The way I read the article is there will be massive vote splitting in the province.

but which way? if there are a lot of people like @Warhippy willing to give the best candidate vs party a chance its so hard to predict what will happen in terms of seats. 

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1 hour ago, Jimmy McGill said:

for sure it can. This is shaping up to be a really interesting campaign. Will it be Bernier's Revenge? A CPC comeback? The end of Jagmeet? 

 

BC might be the only province where the NDP helps the CPC get some seats. 

Actually, I see the Libs eating the NDP seats.  NE BC is already ceded to the Cons, NW BC is 50/50 the Island will be NDP/Green but Libs stand to make a few huge leaps forward in Vancouver and on the Island.  Albas in the Kelowna area has been meh at best.  Konanz might take the Okanagan South area because the senior demographic sees her as a good manager (why I don't know her time on Penticton council has been laughable at best) 

 

To be totally honest, I don't see much movement either way for the Cons/LIbs in BC.  2 seats either way at best between them BUT I see the NDP losing a ton of support and that support will only go green or Lib

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3 minutes ago, Warhippy said:

Actually, I see the Libs eating the NDP seats.  NE BC is already ceded to the Cons, NW BC is 50/50 the Island will be NDP/Green but Libs stand to make a few huge leaps forward in Vancouver and on the Island.  Albas in the Kelowna area has been meh at best.  Konanz might take the Okanagan South area because the senior demographic sees her as a good manager (why I don't know her time on Penticton council has been laughable at best) 

 

To be totally honest, I don't see much movement either way for the Cons/LIbs in BC.  2 seats either way at best between them BUT I see the NDP losing a ton of support and that support will only go green or Lib

I could see Green doing very well in BC.

 

It'll be fascinating to see what (or if) Bernier is able to influence. Scheers talking points against Trudeau are easy, but does Bernier force Scheer into some far-right arguments he doesn't want to get into (e.g., overreaction with immigration) or does Scheer give up that ground and potentially some votes?

 

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1 hour ago, Jimmy McGill said:

but which way? if there are a lot of people like @Warhippy willing to give the best candidate vs party a chance its so hard to predict what will happen in terms of seats. 

Evolution of free thought. 

Evolution of free thought.png

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Just now, Alflives said:

Evolution of free thought. 

Evolution of free thought.png

funny because its kind of true. 

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On 1/7/2019 at 9:53 PM, mpt said:

Thats what Scheer and the conservatives are painting but not true in the least.

 

Its all about Scheer and the conservatives not standing for conservative principles, kicking him out of the shadow caucus as a punishment for free speech (at the act of his publisher) and turning down every truly conservative policy he proposes?  Why should he stick around, support the party whom doesn’t support truly conservative ideology and be a back bencher just to wait 8-10 years before he can run again.  Its a waste of his life and career.  Anyone who is passionate about their job and feels they are doing the right thing would leave that situation.  Bernier was going to be a nobody in that party, Scheer is a hypocrite advocate of free speech, a sell out to dairy farmers (who else drinks milk in a victory speech) and doesn’t support the true values of limited government, freedom and self responsibility. 

Pretty interesting candidate Bernier has in Burnaby.

 

Bernier's party taps anti-'trans agenda' activist as candidate in Burnaby-South

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/peoples-party-canada-bernier-tyler-thompson-1.4970112

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4 minutes ago, Jimmy McGill said:

I could see Green doing very well in BC.

 

It'll be fascinating to see what (or if) Bernier is able to influence. Scheers talking points against Trudeau are easy, but does Bernier force Scheer into some far-right arguments he doesn't want to get into (e.g., overreaction with immigration) or does Scheer give up that ground and potentially some votes?

 

I see Bernier doing SOME damage in Alberta and maybe Sask, but Ontario/ Quebec will be his battleground and he needs to be strong there.  he can easily play up to the inherent racism and self nationalism so prominent in many aspects of the Quebecois lifestyle.  He can also do damage by vote splitting in the urban centres where much of his message will find very happy breeding grounds.

 

remember, these are the areas of Ontario that supported Ford and Ford had/has VERY similar messages as Bernier did.  He only needs to win 4-6 seats in Ontario and or Quebec to really screw over the Cons

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Just now, Jimmy McGill said:

funny because its kind of true. 

It's a lot easier to be a sheep, than a free thinker.  

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