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189lb enforcers?

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I'm waiting on someone with a solid background in Hinduism to lay into this thread and the conventional timeline of "mankind".

 

They've got some awesome legends.

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8 minutes ago, luckylager said:

Sorry for being presumptuous.

 

I've always felt they're married disciplines

Kettle to Teapot... I’m barely able to draw sounds on here, let alone the line between disciplines. Paleoanthropology also interests me.

 

I’m hoping people start posting articles or something rather than ripping on a source like Hancock. 

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2 minutes ago, luckylager said:

I'm waiting on someone with a solid background in Hinduism to lay into this thread and the conventional timeline of "mankind".

 

They've got some awesome legends.

There’s an Out of India theory as well out there. 

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13 minutes ago, luckylager said:

I'm waiting on someone with a solid background in Hinduism to lay into this thread and the conventional timeline of "mankind".

 

They've got some awesome legends.

There's also the Sumerian kings who, according to records, ruled for 1000s of years.

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3 minutes ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

Kettle to Teapot... I’m barely able to draw sounds on here, let alone the line between disciplines. Paleoanthropology also interests me.

 

I’m hoping people start posting articles or something rather than ripping on a source like Hancock. 

I wish I could share. I'm stuck on POS phone, laptop is &^@#ed, tablet died... First world problems.

 

2 minutes ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

There’s an Out of India theory as well out there. 

I've read about that. If you take Hindu mythological timelines into account, I suppose it's entirely possible.

 

Oh.... Digressing a bit here, but have you read about the Algonquin sites, 14,000 + years old, and the bones they dated / tested showed a genetic marker only found in (modern) Northern France, and one which is shared with Inuit and some East Coast tribes.

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1 minute ago, thejazz97 said:

There's also the Sumerian kings who, according to records, ruled for 1000s of years.

I thought that was a dynastic thing. Every King was named for the King.

 

The Sumerian texts are crazy though. Full of Aliens, giants, fish-people, demigods. 

And to think the Sumerian empire just sprung up out of no where with advanced mathematics, societal structure, education, hospitals, libraries...

 

Ever read about the Phoenicians? There's old Celtic / druidic tales of the sea farers from the south. Some legends claim that's where the dark curly hair and brown eyes of some Irish came from. They were traded slaves from the Phoenician ships.

 

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4 minutes ago, luckylager said:

I thought that was a dynastic thing. Every King was named for the King.

 

The Sumerian texts are crazy though. Full of Aliens, giants, fish-people, demigods. 

And to think the Sumerian empire just sprung up out of no where with advanced mathematics, societal structure, education, hospitals, libraries...

 

Ever read about the Phoenicians? There's old Celtic / druidic tales of the sea farers from the south. Some legends claim that's where the dark curly hair and brown eyes of some Irish came from. They were traded slaves from the Phoenician ships.

 

The Phoenicians were absolutely incredible and are probably one of if not my favourite early civilizations.

 

Written alphabet, incredible sea-based trading network... I try to learn as much about them as I can.

 

I'm thinking that if a place like Gobekli Tepe existed 10k-12k years ago, there must have been an intermediate stage between having a shrine and having an empire.

 

Another cool thing about Central Asia (and I want to go to Uzbekistan+area for this reason) is that it was the between-hub for Sumeria and the Indus Valley civilization - pretty much the original silk road.

 

It's been awhile since I've read up on it, but it basically allowed the two cultures to have influence on each other as both used the area frequently. Greek and Hindu pantheons are similar in the aspect of having three gods above the rest AFAIK, so it wouldn't surprise me if that was a result of it.

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7 hours ago, Ghostsof1915 said:

Pseudo-Archeology. 

 

Hancock is a hack, and has been a sensationalist writer for years. 

 

He twists stories to fit his narrative. 

 

To be fair that can be said for many, many scientists, historians, and archaeologists. That they twist facts to fit a narrative or agenda.

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The Eye of the Sahara seems pretty cool.  

It's just so unfortunate that it's in a middle of nowhere and thus nobody is really willing to go there to check it out.  

 

As for ancient civilizations prior to those taught in our standard history books, I wouldn't be surprised if there were some.  Not those theories about aliens or people with future-tech from the past, but unknown civilizations.  Cities can disappear in an instant... heck, Pompeii is a known and recorded city, but it took almost 2000 years after it was destroyed for someone to actually go, "oh hey, lets dig that spot".

There are probably lots of places buried underwater or in regions now covered with the desert.  

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In the past several years my wife and I have spent weeks and months visiting as many archaeological sites as we could find in Mexico. So far, we have visited and photographed 42 different sites and numerous museums, both local and two world class ones in Mexico City (National Museum of Anthropology) and in Xalapa (Museum of Anthropology Xalapa). For anyone going to Mexico, you can reasonably skip Chichen Itza and Tulum because of how crowded they are. Literally hundreds of people per day are there, meaning lineups and knots of people around all the most photogenic features. Here are my top five recommended sites which will be visually stunning and not very crowded at all. 

 

1. El Tajin - in Veracruz state near the town of Papantla. A four to five hour bus trip from Mexico City, El Tajin is famous for its Pyramid of the Niches, which reportedly has 365 niches on all four sides. Absolutely stunning and probably my favourite of all.

2. Mayapan - a small but completely cleared and restored site near Merida, on the Yucatan. You will most likely be the only person(s) there. Very dramatic and well laid out.

3. Edzna - near the city of Campeche on the Yucatan. Gorgeous reconstruction, with one of the most beautiful pyramids in Mexico. Not at all crowded.

4. Monte Alban - just outside of the city of Oaxaca, in the far south of Mexico. The builders of this massive site levelled the top of a mountain, then built from huge stone blocks that were carried up from the valley below WITHOUT the use of pack animals, which did not exist in the Americas until the Spanish brought horses. Can be moderately crowded, but it is a huge site and very photogenic.

5. Yaxchilan - about two hours southeast of Palenque (which is also an awesome site but very crowded. Still very much worth the effort) Yaxchilan is reached via a 30 minute river boat ride through thick selva (jungle). All of a sudden, this ancient city appears on the banks of the Usamacinta River. You feel like you are in Apocalypse Now, travelling up a river through the jungle. Can also be intermittently crowded. If you go, arrange for a tour out of Palenque. Should be about $125-150 US, but worth it.

 

Other sites worth visiting but likely to be crowded include Teotihuacan (near Mexico City), Palenque (in Tabasco state), Chichen Itza (no way around the crowds and hawkers), Tulum (architecture not all that interesting, but the setting is dramatic) and Uxmal (near Merida and Campeche) which is large and well restored, but can be crowded. Calakmul is a huge, confusing site, but much of it is obscured by forest and it is about 35 kilometres off the main highway down a paved road.

 

Finally, you can visit dozens of Mayan sites on the Yucatan peninsula if you rent a car and book hotels in Valladolid, Merida, Campeche, Xpujil and/or Chetumal. Driving is easy, roads are good and there is very little traffic outside of Cancun (AVOID) and Playa del Carmen (AVOID). If you would like more detailed information, send me a private message and I can help.

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https://magneticreversal.org

 

If you’re interested in magnetic pole shifting and it’s relation to everything from climate and the collapses of civilizations to cosmic influences on our planet, you can learn a lot here. Well, you’ll learn to laugh at the Climate Change narrative that needs your money like any other religion, haha 

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It’s PhD-study worthy that posters would rather look in the Trump thread with their mental masterbation trash and habits than learn about something profound. 

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5 hours ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

Guarantee this will change how you look at the past.

 

 

 

But hit mute.

the music is intentionally horrible. 

 

Honestly, Didn’t really get the message. Maybe I started drinking too early...again... 

 

Just saw a thousand pictures of beautiful cities that I’ve never been to. Is there a pattern?

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On 8/12/2019 at 1:45 PM, Curmudgeon said:

In the past several years my wife and I have spent weeks and months visiting as many archaeological sites as we could find in Mexico. So far, we have visited and photographed 42 different sites and numerous museums, both local and two world class ones in Mexico City (National Museum of Anthropology) and in Xalapa (Museum of Anthropology Xalapa). For anyone going to Mexico, you can reasonably skip Chichen Itza and Tulum because of how crowded they are. Literally hundreds of people per day are there, meaning lineups and knots of people around all the most photogenic features. Here are my top five recommended sites which will be visually stunning and not very crowded at all. 

 

1. El Tajin - in Veracruz state near the town of Papantla. A four to five hour bus trip from Mexico City, El Tajin is famous for its Pyramid of the Niches, which reportedly has 365 niches on all four sides. Absolutely stunning and probably my favourite of all.

2. Mayapan - a small but completely cleared and restored site near Merida, on the Yucatan. You will most likely be the only person(s) there. Very dramatic and well laid out.

3. Edzna - near the city of Campeche on the Yucatan. Gorgeous reconstruction, with one of the most beautiful pyramids in Mexico. Not at all crowded.

4. Monte Alban - just outside of the city of Oaxaca, in the far south of Mexico. The builders of this massive site levelled the top of a mountain, then built from huge stone blocks that were carried up from the valley below WITHOUT the use of pack animals, which did not exist in the Americas until the Spanish brought horses. Can be moderately crowded, but it is a huge site and very photogenic.

5. Yaxchilan - about two hours southeast of Palenque (which is also an awesome site but very crowded. Still very much worth the effort) Yaxchilan is reached via a 30 minute river boat ride through thick selva (jungle). All of a sudden, this ancient city appears on the banks of the Usamacinta River. You feel like you are in Apocalypse Now, travelling up a river through the jungle. Can also be intermittently crowded. If you go, arrange for a tour out of Palenque. Should be about $125-150 US, but worth it.

 

Other sites worth visiting but likely to be crowded include Teotihuacan (near Mexico City), Palenque (in Tabasco state), Chichen Itza (no way around the crowds and hawkers), Tulum (architecture not all that interesting, but the setting is dramatic) and Uxmal (near Merida and Campeche) which is large and well restored, but can be crowded. Calakmul is a huge, confusing site, but much of it is obscured by forest and it is about 35 kilometres off the main highway down a paved road.

 

Finally, you can visit dozens of Mayan sites on the Yucatan peninsula if you rent a car and book hotels in Valladolid, Merida, Campeche, Xpujil and/or Chetumal. Driving is easy, roads are good and there is very little traffic outside of Cancun (AVOID) and Playa del Carmen (AVOID). If you would like more detailed information, send me a private message and I can help.

Have you ever been to EK Balam? 

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2 hours ago, Canorth said:

Honestly, Didn’t really get the message. Maybe I started drinking too early...again... 

 

Just saw a thousand pictures of beautiful cities that I’ve never been to. Is there a pattern?

Yes. 

Go look at those channels.

Star Forts. 

Quite the thing.

All over this earth, these old things exist. 

Explain that! 

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7 minutes ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

Yes. 

Go look at those channels.

Star Forts. 

Quite the thing.

All over this earth, these old things exist. 

Explain that! 

Thanks, man. Didn’t need to look at those channels to see what I should have not missed the first time around: but I will check them out. Pretty amazing. I love this sh!t

 

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5 hours ago, Standing_Tall#37 said:

Have you ever been to EK Balam? 

Yes. It is worth the time and effort to get there from Valladolid. There is a central pyramid that you could climb two or three years ago, but so many sites have begun to prohibit people climbing on the structures I don't know if Ek Balam is or isn't, but there is a restored portion of the pyramid that has plaster sculptures of Mayan themes. Valladollid is a pleasant, small town with a few cenotes in the area that are worth the money and are swimmable. Cenote Dzitnup is a few kilometres southwest of town and Cenote Zaci is two or three blocks from the central square. Chichen Itza is about 45-50 minutes west of Valladolid.  If you happen to be on your own with a rental car, the town of Piste is about ten minutes from Chichen Itza. On the main road through town, on the south side of the street is a restaurant called Pollos Los Parajos. A very jovial man grills whole chickens on a charcoal grill outside the front of the semi-open seating area. You get a whole chicken for two, a soup and I think tomatoes and onions. There is nothing like chicken grilled this way, which is done over much of Mexico. But yeah, I've been to Ek Balam.

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