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31 minutes ago, Curmudgeon said:

Yes. It is worth the time and effort to get there from Valladolid. There is a central pyramid that you could climb two or three years ago, but so many sites have begun to prohibit people climbing on the structures I don't know if Ek Balam is or isn't, but there is a restored portion of the pyramid that has plaster sculptures of Mayan themes. Valladollid is a pleasant, small town with a few cenotes in the area that are worth the money and are swimmable. Cenote Dzitnup is a few kilometres southwest of town and Cenote Zaci is two or three blocks from the central square. Chichen Itza is about 45-50 minutes west of Valladolid.  If you happen to be on your own with a rental car, the town of Piste is about ten minutes from Chichen Itza. On the main road through town, on the south side of the street is a restaurant called Pollos Los Parajos. A very jovial man grills whole chickens on a charcoal grill outside the front of the semi-open seating area. You get a whole chicken for two, a soup and I think tomatoes and onions. There is nothing like chicken grilled this way, which is done over much of Mexico. But yeah, I've been to Ek Balam.

I found Ek Balam fascinating. I went when you were allowed to climb on it. What I was amazed at was the perfect 90° that the steps and structures were made at.  Me and my buddy(who’re both tradesman) were  discussing how you couldn’t nail that much today with 100% accuracy on that much structure.

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35 minutes ago, Standing_Tall#37 said:

I found Ek Balam fascinating. I went when you were allowed to climb on it. What I was amazed at was the perfect 90° that the steps and structures were made at.  Me and my buddy(who’re both tradesman) were  discussing how you couldn’t nail that much today with 100% accuracy on that much structure.

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Simply awesome. The really cool thing about the Maya is that more sites are being uncovered all the time. I listened to a podcast about the cultivation of corn on the Yucatan peninsula. This particular researcher believes there isn't a single square metre of the entire peninsula that wasn't under cultivation at one time or another. 

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10 hours ago, Curmudgeon said:

Simply awesome. The really cool thing about the Maya is that more sites are being uncovered all the time. I listened to a podcast about the cultivation of corn on the Yucatan peninsula. This particular researcher believes there isn't a single square metre of the entire peninsula that wasn't under cultivation at one time or another. 

That is awesome, I hope to see a lot more in my lifetime, but that was my first one. Perhaps when the children move out lol. You seem well travelled, so I’ll ask, what were your favourite places you have been to?

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2 hours ago, Standing_Tall#37 said:

That is awesome, I hope to see a lot more in my lifetime, but that was my first one. Perhaps when the children move out lol. You seem well travelled, so I’ll ask, what were your favourite places you have been to?

Yeah, life begins when the kids move out and the dog dies. If you are asking about Mexico as a whole, I have to tell you that my wife and I have a bit of an obsession with Mexico and have travelled and stayed in 24 or 25 different states, but have avoided all of the northern states for safety reasons. Here are some highlights:

1. The west central highlands are north and west of Mexico City to Guadalajara (great city). Three outstanding places to spend two or three nights each are Guanajuato, San Miguel de Allende and Morelia. Guanajuato is awesome, San Miguel is full of art and great architecture and Morelia is a university town full of young, arty folks and great food.

2. Merida, on the Yucatan Peninsula, is a busy city (and always hot) which is very close to a number of Mayan sites. My local favourites, which are tricky to find but worth it, are Oxkintok and Mayapan. Also try to make it to the Loltun Caves, which are awesome. A great hotel in Merida is the Hotel Gran. You really need a car if you are going to spend any time on the Yucatan. Driving is dead easy and rentals are pretty reasonable through Rentalcars.com.

3. Veracruz state is beautiful and has lots to see, but the city of Veracruz is tired, run down, not especially friendly. We've stayed there twice and did not enjoy it either time. The city of Jalapa (or Xalapa) is in the mountains and has a stunning, world class museum full of Olmec giant heads and scores of other Gulf Coast artifacts. We made a special trip to Jalapa just to see the museum and would do it again. Papantla is farther north but is the place to stay to visit El Tajin, which is certainly in my top five in all of Mexico. (Along with Palenque, Yaxchilan, Edzna and Teotihuacan.

4. Oaxaca city is out of the way, but a great place. Take a local tour that includes Hierve el agua, a weaving factory, lunch and a visit to a mexcal distillery (free drink).

5. Zihuatanejo is a great place to chill out at the beach for a week or two. 

6. Taxco is built on several hillsides and is where virtually all the silver jewellry in Mexico is crafted. There are over 600 silver shops in this lovely place about three hours south of Mexico City.

7. Mexico City is fabulous. Many people avoid it because they think it is dangerous. While it is not a place to wander aimlessly around at night, you'll be fine if you stay alert, stay sober (in public) and don't hail a cab on the street. There is so much to do in Mexico City that you could stay three weeks and still find things to see and do.

8. Guadalajara is great if you find a hotel within a few blocks of the centre of town. Lots to see and do in the Centro Historic. Be sure to see the stairwell mural in the government building. It is a depiction of Father Miguel Hidalgo, one of the fathers of Mexican Independence from Spain. The mural is magnificent.

9. The south coast of Oaxaca is remote, but very peaceful and laid back. We liked Puerto Escondido (great for surfers) and Puerto Angel (tiny town, great beach).

10. Isla Mujeres is a short ferry ride from Cancun and has my favourite beach on the east coast of Mexico, Playa Norte. We wound up there during Carnavale one year where several costumed flash mobs would stop traffic at any intersection and dance to music set at volume 15. 

 

Places we won't go back to stay: Playa del Carmen, Cancun, maybe Cabo San Lucas (all kind of glitzy and foreign-touristy) and Veracruz city (a sullen place) and Acapulco (where actual human heads have sometimes turned up on city streets).

 

Hope this is helpful. Feel free to ask me anything else. I can talk Mexico for days.

 

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We are getting closer to proving the ice age ended with a bang by finding new sites across the planet which support the original claims. Many many fragments of an asteroid or comet are being discussed as the melt mechanism, not just a single, sizeable impact. This article highlights how the theory is pretty much an accepted science at this point. I’m looking forward to seeing kids learning about other theories on human migration and population of North America, especially about travel over land bridges and “ice free corridor”, etc. 
 

We are a step closer to understanding past civilizations, IMO. 
 

Flood myths exist in most every civilization or culture. 
 

Who knows what was washed away thousands of years ago in places like the Snake River area or where other humongous Great Lakes containing melt water washed away. 
 

Evidence of Cosmic Impact at Abu Hureyra, Syria at the Younger Dryas Onset (~12.8 ka): High-temperature melting at >2200 °C

 

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-03/uoc--fft030620.php

 

 


 

 

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Posted (edited)

Different races from different species?

 

As far as I understand it, DNA states that the lineages of “Europeans” are different than “African” people, for instance.

 

Does this topic remain a politically unacceptable topic on the discussion of Race? 
 

I’m still learning as I go and find it difficult to get through google info-firewalls to attain unbiased info, so into the fringe I go, sharing some of what I find. 

 

Advances in genetics tell the story, but the owners of media and our education systems don’t publicize it much. 
 

Agriculture has had a profound impact on our facial features and capacity to reach “high” civilization. I wonder how long it takes for a human jaw to adjust to diet and how much time is required to manifest the movement of our galaxy into man made structures. 
 

Here are two videos out of many that attempt to speak to the false, yet mainstream Out Of Africa theory as it relates to hominin DNA. 

 

As I struggle with my own limitations and ignorance I feel a little closer to the truth about our planets’s shared history, as modern humans, but according to DNA, we undoubtedly have brothers from another mother. when it comes to the human Family Tree.

 

I’d rather this info was mainstream in our schools instead of the apparent hoax all kids are taught as part of their educashun on human evolution and race, no matter how socially inappropriate it has become to examine our shared past. Assuming the DNA studies are true, all humans are being misled and share in this deception. 


 

 


 

 

Edited by 189lb enforcers?

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On 8/11/2019 at 11:48 AM, 189lb enforcers? said:

Some things are interesting, like the changing dates which man is said to have been around for in certain areas of the world, genetics and past civilizations. It’s a broad field. 

Alternative sources are also interesting. Some are so far out there that I can’t quite figure it out. I’ve learned a fair bit from these though. I started at looking at North America for the earliest signs of occupation. It’s been quite the journey. That took me into looking into the hominids and down rabbit holes. Now I’m hooked and realize how truly ignorant I am concerning my understanding of the world and our place in it. I think we are much older and more capable of a species than I’ve been taught, hence the thread. 

 

On 8/11/2019 at 12:18 PM, xereau said:

Graham Hancock and Randall Carlson. First guys has been writing about how civilization is way older than we've always been taught. Was laughed at for a long time, by what amount to tenured bullies (professors protecting their precious paradigms) but he has slowly been shown to be right. History has not been a straight arrow at ALL. There have been die offs, and hard restarts for a long time. Second guy has been showing how a comet impact probably ended the last ice age. Both radical ideas when first presented, but evidence is piling up for both.

Tenured scientists, and their bully consensus is nothing new, but, those brave enough to push the envelope of what is accepted are why we as a species have made it this far.

I find all of this type of information fascinating, and as you mention, I don't think mainstream archaeologists have any real clue on how many advanced civilizations the Earth has supported in the past or when.

 

When I first got into reading about this stuff, I always remembered reading about Mesopotamia, the supposed cradle of civilization that was around 5,000 years ago. Then you start seeing places like Gobekli Tepe or dozens of other sites where expert engineers are stating we could not even build those today. Yet we are told some stone age culture did build them.  They also have no idea how old the sites really are or why pyramids have now been found all over the planet.

 

The mainstream theories simply no longer make any sense and all these sites make one wonder how long ago some ancient highly advanced civilization lived on the Earth. 

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https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/60-mammoths-house-russia-180974426/
 

Massive 25,000 year-old Mammoth bone Structure found.

 

This is pretty much when the last ice age began to ramp up again I think, peaking around 17k years ago for cold. 
 

How, why and who put these bones there like that? 
Incredible find. 

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1 minute ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/60-mammoths-house-russia-180974426/
 

Massive 25,000 year-old Mammoth bone Structure found.

 

This is pretty much when the last ice age began to ramp up again I think, peaking around 17k years ago for cold. 
 

How, why and who put these bones there like that? 
Incredible find. 

wow, that's amazing,

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Just now, bishopshodan said:

wow, that's amazing,

66 mammoths? 
 

How do you even begin to get them all to one spot like that?

Those creatures dwarf an elephant. 
 

The article is a bit dry because of what it leaves out for the sake of scope and word count, but once you consider the bigger picture of location, etc, it’s a fascinating discovery. 
 

I hope others are finding these discoveries as interesting. I don’t see many posts though, so thanks for yours. I was hoping to share sources and info in the thread. 

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16 minutes ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

66 mammoths? 
 

How do you even begin to get them all to one spot like that?

Those creatures dwarf an elephant. 
 

The article is a bit dry because of what it leaves out for the sake of scope and word count, but once you consider the bigger picture of location, etc, it’s a fascinating discovery. 
 

I hope others are finding these discoveries as interesting. I don’t see many posts though, so thanks for yours. I was hoping to share sources and info in the thread. 

I was just saying that to my wife. Unreal, they must have been pretty advanced humans as suggested by the indoor fire, veggies, tools etc, would have been quite a task to build that... So many questions about their culture

I enjoy your posts on this topic. I firmly believe our evolution is not the way it was taught to us in school. I like hearing of the finds that suggest we as humans have been far more advanced at times in the past than originally believed. 

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17 minutes ago, bishopshodan said:

I was just saying that to my wife. Unreal, they must have been pretty advanced humans as suggested by the indoor fire, veggies, tools etc, would have been quite a task to build that... So many questions about their culture

I enjoy your posts on this topic. I firmly believe our evolution is not the way it was taught to us in school. I like hearing of the finds that suggest we as humans have been far more advanced at times in the past than originally believed. 

Those couple of videos I posted, though controversial, offer a different perspective on our human story. 
 

I hope others offer similar resources. 
 

Did you ever check out Star Forts? 
 

How absolutely astonishing a feat, for those “primitive” men. 

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2 minutes ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

Those couple of videos I posted, though controversial, offer a different perspective on our human story. 
 

I hope others offer similar resources. 
 

Did you ever check out Star Forts? 
 

How absolutely astonishing a feat, for those “primitive” men. 

I'll watch the vids later on.

 

I have not heard of Star Forts by primitive men...think I have seen some pictures of middle ages ones.

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On 3/30/2020 at 10:25 AM, 189lb enforcers? said:

Those couple of videos I posted, though controversial, offer a different perspective on our human story. 
 

I hope others offer similar resources. 
 

Did you ever check out Star Forts? 
 

How absolutely astonishing a feat, for those “primitive” men. 

I watched the first vid. I understand now why you stated that they were controversial. There are many that would not like the premise due simply to skin colour. The producer of the vid does that fear no service by inserting a picture of two folks wearing shirts ' well spotted, I'm a Muzungu'. Now, it could be easily taken as a joke like ...some tribal people saw us and thought we were gods . But given the context, that the video is implying exactly that...that white people may be descendants of these higher beings, leaves a bitter taste in my mouth. 

 

I have always enjoyed the idea of Anunnaki, read a bit about Sumerian stories.  I find this idea of Atlanteans, lost cities, Neanderthal being more than the dumb brutes we were taught, fascinating. They have found so much that can't be explained. Different types of humans remains, structures that are at a scale that it's mind blowing and simply evidence that things may have been way different. Things may have been very advanced a long time ago. 

 

Might watch the other video tonight. Again though, I find this guy's premise to have an undertone. One that people may register as someone suggesting white people are...well, better. 

 

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18 hours ago, bishopshodan said:

I watched the first vid. I understand now why you stated that they were controversial. There are many that would not like the premise due simply to skin colour. The producer of the vid does that fear no service by inserting a picture of two folks wearing shirts ' well spotted, I'm a Muzungu'. Now, it could be easily taken as a joke like ...some tribal people saw us and thought we were gods . But given the context, that the video is implying exactly that...that white people may be descendants of these higher beings, leaves a bitter taste in my mouth. 

 

I have always enjoyed the idea of Anunnaki, read a bit about Sumerian stories.  I find this idea of Atlanteans, lost cities, Neanderthal being more than the dumb brutes we were taught, fascinating. They have found so much that can't be explained. Different types of humans remains, structures that are at a scale that it's mind blowing and simply evidence that things may have been way different. Things may have been very advanced a long time ago. 

 

Might watch the other video tonight. Again though, I find this guy's premise to have an undertone. One that people may register as someone suggesting white people are...well, better. 

 

I’ve removed the one video due to your first impressions because I don’t want the focus to be on anything that would be divisive. 
 

I think I understand your comments. Since a I’ve watched quite a few on that creator’s videos, I know there are other videos required as something like a prerequisite of sorts to understand the topic as it relates to key terms you’ve cited. 
 

It’s difficult to put forth ideas in this political climate where academia and media seem locked in step with certain narratives and labelling rival thought as some brand of ignorance and hate. To question mainstream narratives and it’s facilitator, the education system, is to place yourself on a cross where all that’s left to do is decide upon which hill for your certain crucifixion, in my experience. 
 

What I took from that removed video was that, like the blue eyes in so much of our ancient civilizations’ art, the Africans of old being referenced, whose legends and myths already had a name for what we can argue is white people, several ancient high civilizations had red or blonde-haired, tall, slender, blue-eyed gods or what have you, throughout all the world.
 

It’s not a supremacist position to take to revisit these myths and art and examine the original or aboriginal word being continued to used to describe white people by a certain group of Africans, but I do not align very well with political norms, so I’ve decided to not start a distracting gong show over the complexity surrounding discussion on race in this thread. 
 

I think there is so much ground a person would have to cover about the apparent hidden history of humankind before a video like that could be viewed without offending.
 

Are people ready to come to terms with what narratives are out there which seem blatantly untrue? In my experience, that’s a hard no. Each of us will have a different reference or starting point for our realizations that most of what we are being taught about ourselves as a species is grossly misinformed and that will impact our responses, condition responses, especially. 

 

Humans as different species is quite the topic. It’s completely off limits, despite our varied DNA and of which hominids we come from. Someday, I hope to know so much more about how I currently perceive what I think I “know” about all of this human storyline. What does either of us really know other than what we are allowed to? I can’t even find the same results on Google that I used to for searches. Information in opposition to current political aspects of this thread is harder to find and I suspect it will soon be erased from our searches all together. It does make you wonder. There is certainly no shortage of info on Nazi this or that though, for example. Interesting times. 

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6 hours ago, 189lb enforcers? said:

I’ve removed the one video due to your first impressions because I don’t want the focus to be on anything that would be divisive. 
 

I think I understand your comments. Since a I’ve watched quite a few on that creator’s videos, I know there are other videos required as something like a prerequisite of sorts to understand the topic as it relates to key terms you’ve cited. 
 

It’s difficult to put forth ideas in this political climate where academia and media seem locked in step with certain narratives and labelling rival thought as some brand of ignorance and hate. To question mainstream narratives and it’s facilitator, the education system, is to place yourself on a cross where all that’s left to do is decide upon which hill for your certain crucifixion, in my experience. 
 

What I took from that removed video was that, like the blue eyes in so much of our ancient civilizations’ art, the Africans of old being referenced, whose legends and myths already had a name for what we can argue is white people, several ancient high civilizations had red or blonde-haired, tall, slender, blue-eyed gods or what have you, throughout all the world.
 

It’s not a supremacist position to take to revisit these myths and art and examine the original or aboriginal word being continued to used to describe white people by a certain group of Africans, but I do not align very well with political norms, so I’ve decided to not start a distracting gong show over the complexity surrounding discussion on race in this thread. 
 

I think there is so much ground a person would have to cover about the apparent hidden history of humankind before a video like that could be viewed without offending.
 

Are people ready to come to terms with what narratives are out there which seem blatantly untrue? In my experience, that’s a hard no. Each of us will have a different reference or starting point for our realizations that most of what we are being taught about ourselves as a species is grossly misinformed and that will impact our responses, condition responses, especially. 

 

Humans as different species is quite the topic. It’s completely off limits, despite our varied DNA and of which hominids we come from. Someday, I hope to know so much more about how I currently perceive what I think I “know” about all of this human storyline. What does either of us really know other than what we are allowed to? I can’t even find the same results on Google that I used to for searches. Information in opposition to current political aspects of this thread is harder to find and I suspect it will soon be erased from our searches all together. It does make you wonder. There is certainly no shortage of info on Nazi this or that though, for example. Interesting times. 

Thanks for your response.

I understand your concerns.

 

My hope is that the professionals and experts continue to evolve in their own way when analysing finds from sites. What I mean is, reporting archeological evidence as they believe it is. No matter if it is controversial. Hopefully in time, technology will help us find and understand more than we previously have.

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A 50,000-year-old piece of string hints at Neanderthal intelligence, scientists say

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/world/a-50000-year-old-piece-of-string-hints-at-neanderthal-intelligence-scientists-say/ar-BB12o8QE

 

Yep, being called a Neanderthal might not be a dis at all.

Maybe should be a compliment? 

 

 

 

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